Rut Maintenance

author: moguitar date: 09/04/2013 category: junkyard
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voted: 3
Rut Maintenance
My tip for learning guitar, or indeed any culture orientated skill, would be thus; just shut the f--k up once in a while, and take a step back from the whole ridiculous zeitgeist that has grown around it. Don't let D-ckhead-Joe-from-that-other-band aggressively assert that you don't need to learn theory, or that you need to buy a new instrument with a different shitting logo on it, or to trawl through the endless amounts of rubbish online to try to memorise all of the modes in effort to get as many notes in to a bar as possible*. Listen for gems of clarity, but don't commit to a paragraph of nonsense. There is no gospel truth. There is no spoon. ##As a side note, there is plenty of decent material online, but there is also a horrendous amount of glaring errors, poor schools of thought, and a sense of academic number crunching with no real value.## Shut the f--k up, D-ckhead-Joe-from-that-other-band, think about what you want to learn next, imbibe the culture, enjoy it, there is no rush. Don't bother learning about modes if you're not applying the sounds they can generate, use them to understand something you already know, and if you're struggling to get it, you may have simply not learnt enough "case studies," if you will. Play with anybody, on any instrument, even Mr. Midi, or that stupid track from the '90s that you love and hate. Shut up for a bit, listen to what it is you are actually enjoying* about what they're doing, contrast it with what you don't like, and then have a go at understanding why, in whatever terms you find comfortable. Be it notes, chords, bends per moment, phrasing, a time change, some fiddly piano bit, even the lack of any guitar, put a label on what it is you like about it, and replicate it, carbon-copy or abstract pastiche, just enjoy it, and look forward to it. You will remember these things beautifully, and later in your career you can start to see the bigger picture as you build up a dictionary of things you enjoy playing or hearing. ##"Sweet mother of mercy that's a screamin' bend, I'm having a do on him."## Music theory simply organises what you like and what you don't like into common terms. There is nothing you can learn that is a step backwards, and most importantly, in my humble experience, just shut the f--k up and listen to what somebody is playing or saying to you without second guessing it, too many guitarists strive to seem as though they know more than they do, or to seem like the bigger fish, and it means nobody seems to listen any more. How are you ever going to learn anything if you know it all already? Again, listen for clarity, but do not commit to a gospel truth. There is no spoon. Do not let people insist they know more or better than you, especially in regard to your own playing, your own style. My experience with other players is either learning something fresh, playing in a new way, or that and then having to politely excuse myself for their gear-fad-fuelled conceited bullsh-t about "the proper way to do things." This is all the culture, and doesn't even touch the experience of you playing, or anybody learning anything. In summary, do not try to be top dog, your progress will cease. If you've learnt all of the theory; you've done something wrong. If you've mastered sweep picking at 200bpm you probably sound like a beehive, have a go at some Soul, or Rhumba, branch out, do not box yourself in to a style in order to be number one in your zip code, get yourself a shitty tone out of your sh-tty Squier practice amp, and make some decent sounds with it. Oh, and please roll some of the gain off, there's a special circle of beginners to intermediates who insist having the gain on 10. It doesn't hide your mistakes. It makes you sound like a poorly tuned radio. There is no guitar line in any record that has more distortion than is the bare minimum.
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