Is a Half Stack too big to record with?


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hayz_182
05-13-2009, 03:53 AM
hey i've got a marshall jvm410 half stack, just wondering if its too big to record with as far as getting pro quality productions?

Martindecorum
05-13-2009, 04:03 AM
there really no limit in having size going into recording room if you can get a good tone out of it that tone will be recorded

A Certain Death
05-13-2009, 04:07 AM
it'll be fine.
but for best results, try to get a direct line in from your head to a mixer/recording unit.

Martindecorum
05-13-2009, 04:12 AM
it'll be fine.
but for best results, try to get a direct line in from your head to a mixer/recording unit.

for even better dual record line in and mic at the same time its get this awesome dynamic tone

doive
05-13-2009, 04:21 AM
for even better dual record line in and mic at the same time its get this awesome dynamic tone
this, careful about where you place your mic in front of it too, have a fiddle around and see what sounds best to you, but for a 4x10 i would pick speaker and go slightly off centre from that rather than straight down the middle of the cab or a single speaker

hayz_182
05-13-2009, 06:38 AM
Doesn't going direct line in bipass the speaker and therefore lose a lot of the quality tone?

NOSPI
05-13-2009, 06:57 AM
Doesn't going direct line in bipass the speaker and therefore lose a lot of the quality tone?

Yeah, i don't get why people record direct from the amp line out to the interface/mixer. I've done this when recording from my amp (Randal RG40R) with distortion and it sounds terrible. Absolutely nothing like the sound of the amp, and its just all fuzzy.

I close mic my amp with a Shure SM58 and im happy with the results, because i know i won't get a perfect professional sound.

fridge_raider
05-13-2009, 08:26 AM
it'll be fine.
but for best results, try to get a direct line in from your head to a mixer/recording unit.


Were you being serious?

timbit2006
05-13-2009, 11:29 AM
Were you being serious?

Judging by all the posts after his... I believe he was.

@A Certain Death
:facepalm: MEGA :facepalm:

That is the crappiest advice I heard all day!(I just woke up though)
For best results, I suggest micing it. You will have to experiment with the positins to get your desired sound. Just, /whatever you do... Do not put the mic more than 6 inches away, unless you want the mic to pick up everything else in the room. You can do this if you have your room acoustically treated.

willieturnip
05-13-2009, 12:56 PM
Is this question even serious?

timbit2006
05-13-2009, 06:42 PM
Is this question even serious?

Sadly... I think this question is serious.
It's the dumbest question I've heard in a while. and, The Line-In better than micing is the dumbest answer I heard in a while.
As the old saying goes
"A dumb question gets a dumb answer"

TS, Just in case no one has answered(sorry if anyone has)
No amp is to big to be mic'd.
You could mic a wall of sound if you wanted to. You'd just need lots of mics.
The only reason why they make small tube amps now, is because people want to get the sweet sound they get from a tube amp, without the noise when recording.
Imagine having to play a really high-pitched lead track over and over, at full blast on the amp. It'd give you a headache by the time your done.

hayz_182
05-13-2009, 09:41 PM
Haha, the reason I asked the question is because a lot of people seem to think that to get a half stack to sound its best you have to crank it up, but i'm pretty sure the tone is just as good a decent volumes.... and I think I will be micing it with one shure sm57 and also a Rhode NT1A, expecting pretty sweet results from what my engineer friend has told me....

hayz_182
05-13-2009, 09:42 PM
^^^ dynamic, condenser combo ;)

brownsfan456
05-13-2009, 09:43 PM
If your just doing one or two mics for the whole band then make sure it doesnt overpower everything else. If your recording individually though or with multiple mics you should be fine

hayz_182
05-13-2009, 09:56 PM
yer i'm doing individually. drums i'm just using an electric kit.

timbit2006
05-14-2009, 01:32 AM
Haha, the reason I asked the question is because a lot of people seem to think that to get a half stack to sound its best you have to crank it up, but i'm pretty sure the tone is just as good a decent volumes.... and I think I will be micing it with one shure sm57 and also a Rhode NT1A, expecting pretty sweet results from what my engineer friend has told me....

really, you only need to crank a tube amp.
When people say that you need to crank your amp to make it sound good, they're referring to tubes.
Digital will stay Digital no matter how loud it is, unless you've got a tube simulator.

I checked to see if your amp had tubes, and I'm not sure... Something about valves though. Generally, when somethings a tube amp, Its says so in the name. So, I would say it isn't, but you can check. I'm not sure. This is just what I got from the web.

fridge_raider
05-14-2009, 04:20 AM
Valves are tubes, you 'tard :p:

Kid_Thorazine
05-14-2009, 10:23 AM
you can record fine with a halfstack, although IMO it's a bit of a pain in the ass. I would suggest micing the cab over DIing (although ideally you will have a setup where you can do both so you have a clean signal for reamping)

timbit2006
05-14-2009, 11:48 AM
Valves are tubes, you 'tard :p:

I figured that out like 2 mins after I posted it. I searched google images, then I thought... hmm, valves look awefully close to tubes...