beginner guitar for a soon to be 7 year old


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Kilim13
06-20-2009, 10:35 PM
My soon to be 7 year old son has been enticed on getting his own electric guitar after I borrowed my sisters so I can learn how to play guitar a couple weeks ago.
When I asked him if he want the acoustic or electric he said he wanted an electric guitar, specially after we went to the local Guitar Center near us to get some other stuff.

After reading around I am debating on getting the Squier Mini (http://www.guitarcenter.com/Squier-by-Fender-Mini-Strat-Electric-Guitar-102084118-i1146336.gc) or the Dean Playmate Evo Junior (http://www.guitarcenter.com/Dean-Playmate-Evo-J-3-4-Electric-Guitar-620089-i1452636.gc) or Dean Playmate Avalanche J (http://www.guitarcenter.com/Dean-Playmate-Avalanche-J-3-4-Electric-Guitar-620088-i1452634.gc) .

Looking for others that actually know more than me to help me decide on which one to buy him as I actually want to encourage him to learn to play music.
Also, other suggestions would be appreciated.

Also, I am using my sisters Roland MicroCube as an amp.
Should I get the same kind of amp for my sons guitar or there something I should check out?

I just want my son to have a good start is all :D
Maybe he will end up teaching me how to play the guitar :D

BloodHitman
06-20-2009, 10:40 PM
I don't know about the guitars, haha cus ive never looked for a mini person ;) But the microcube should be fine, or mabye even just getting the roland cube instead, you could use it too and its still pretty small.

SunDrop
06-20-2009, 11:08 PM
you could look into an amp that has 2 hookups so you can both play on the same one together. but if he wanted one in his room, and you wanted one somewhere else that wouldnt work to well...so idk

1nSingularity
06-20-2009, 11:10 PM
A Les Paul Junior might be good. Maybe a bit too expensive. If not just get the Squier. A stratocaster is always good to start on.

ZOMGdonuts
06-20-2009, 11:20 PM
Squiers are great to start on, but for a young one with smaller hands you'll probably want something smaller and you seem to be looking at the right stuff

You might want to consider a Dean Baby V (If hes into more interesting shapes) , At the same time, its also about $100 more expensive.

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Dean-Baby-V-Electric-Guitar-519875-i1150769.gc

divortium
06-20-2009, 11:29 PM
Personally I'd recommend telling him not to try it until he's older. If he's hung up on playing an instrument now, don't get him a full-scale guitar. Chances are, you'll only frustrate the poor kid as he realises he isn't capable of playing to any sort of measureable calibre. I attempted guitar at around that age, and I was scared away from it outright for a good four or five years.

a500n54
06-20-2009, 11:45 PM
ESP LTD Kirk Hammett Junior is good if you have the cash but try the 3/4 scale agile sx I bought it to teach my lil bro 7 its solid sounds good but man is that humbucker high output it will easily drive an amp without being muddy but if you want a single coil sound do the mini strat but with all these guitars you'll need to change the tuners.

Scowmoo
06-20-2009, 11:47 PM
Personally I'd recommend telling him not to try it until he's older. If he's hung up on playing an instrument now, don't get him a full-scale guitar. Chances are, you'll only frustrate the poor kid as he realises he isn't capable of playing to any sort of measureable calibre. I attempted guitar at around that age, and I was scared away from it outright for a good four or five years.
That's just you.
I know 7 year olds who are better than me, it all depends on how determined they are.

MESAexplorer
06-20-2009, 11:54 PM
ESP LTD Kirk Hammett Junior is good if you have the cash but try the 3/4 scale agile sx I bought it to teach my lil bro 7 its solid sounds good but man is that humbucker high output it will easily drive an amp without being muddy but if you want a single coil sound do the mini strat but with all these guitars you'll need to change the tuners.

I was thinking of the 3/4 Agile SX as well.

nickdohle
06-21-2009, 12:00 AM
I was given my epiphone les paul when i was 8, but was discouraged, i couldnt play. So if hes determined, you need to make sure he knows hes not gonna be great in one day. And a smaller scale is a good idea.

jetmech
06-21-2009, 12:15 AM
Personally I'd recommend telling him not to try it until he's older. If he's hung up on playing an instrument now, don't get him a full-scale guitar. Chances are, you'll only frustrate the poor kid as he realises he isn't capable of playing to any sort of measureable calibre. I attempted guitar at around that age, and I was scared away from it outright for a good four or five years.
Each person is an individual and while you may not have had a good experience at 7 others do. My daughter is 7 and playing on a full size guitar. She has lessons once a week yet picks up her guitar and plays all the time every day even if at times it's only for 10 or 15 minutes at a crack.

I don't think you can go wrong with a Squier full size, it won't be long before he'll outgrow the mini anyway.

Kilim13
06-21-2009, 09:16 AM
Where do I find 3/4 Agile SX?

Also, no one had any experience with the Dean Guitars I linked?

Spartan101400
06-21-2009, 09:29 AM
The Dean EVO is pretty good for a beginner

divortium
06-21-2009, 10:16 AM
Each person is an individual and while you may not have had a good experience at 7 others do.Of course, but keep a few things in mind. Firstly, I'm not the only one in this thread to have that experience. As you say, every kid is different. It's a risk to get them started this young, and it probably won't lead them anywhere in the long run... At, say, twelve, they might be a smidgen better than they would have been had they started at ten. At this age, physical ability is less important than laying the foundations of music theory. I regret not being put in formal, classical training at a young age - had that happened, my songwriting ability would be a year or two ahead of what it is now, at least.

If the kid is very passionate about it, and is adament about learning, then go for it, but children are whimsical, and there are risks to introducing them this early. Frustration, disappointment and disillusionment, specifically.

a500n54
06-21-2009, 10:22 AM
Where do I find 3/4 Agile SX?

Also, no one had any experience with the Dean Guitars I linked?
http://www.rondomusic.com/electricguitar.html

austinb0309
06-21-2009, 10:25 AM
I had the same problem learning on a full size guitar young. I couldn't even play power chords and i gave up after 3 months. I think you should definitely get the smaller scale guitar, but most importantly one that is set up well (i.e. low action and is very easy to play). Looks and feel will be more important to a 7 year old than tone and all that other junk we worry about. If he thinks it looks cool and its easy to play he probably won't get discouraged easily!

burnboy85
06-21-2009, 10:38 AM
http://www.rondomusic.com/si11.html
http://www.rondomusic.com/sst6234vwh.html

jetmech
06-21-2009, 10:57 AM
Of course, but keep a few things in mind. Firstly, I'm not the only one in this thread to have that experience. As you say, every kid is different. It's a risk to get them started this young, and it probably won't lead them anywhere in the long run... At, say, twelve, they might be a smidgen better than they would have been had they started at ten. At this age, physical ability is less important than laying the foundations of music theory. I regret not being put in formal, classical training at a young age - had that happened, my songwriting ability would be a year or two ahead of what it is now, at least.

If the kid is very passionate about it, and is adament about learning, then go for it, but children are whimsical, and there are risks to introducing them this early. Frustration, disappointment and disillusionment, specifically.
Right it all depends on the maturity level of the child, however you are discouraging him from even trying. Yeah you risk the it's just a phase thing but you buy a reasonably priced guitar to start and if it's just a phase for the kid then craigslist or eBay it goes and you aren't out all that much if anything and you still allowed the child the chance to see. So they try and get discouraged, they get discouraged in a loss in a little league game, basketball, or youth wrestling. Obviously as a parent you should be able to talk to your child and let them know upfront that they are not going to be playing like they hear on radio for sometime and not to get discouraged but to keep practicing and encourage their progress. There's good days and bad days. My son's 1st b-day is coming up and my daughter is so excited that she is going to play happy birthday for him on her guitar. I would say you have a 50/50 chance to them starting at that age and sticking with it but who's to know if you don't give it a go?

Kilim13
06-21-2009, 10:58 AM
What are the pros/cons of each? compared to each other?
(Which would you consider the best in this bunch?)
Squier Mini?
Dean Evo J?
Dean Avalanche J?
Agile?

I guess I got it down to those as to what to get.
Just need more input.

PS:
Going to Sam Ash later today to just look around with my son also.
But not planning to buy anything for another week.

PPS:
If my son somehow does NOT stick with the guitar.
Then at least I will have a small guitar of my own to play with.
Or maybe have my wife to learn from :D


I am posting about "What guitar to get my son?" NOT "Should I get my son a guitar?"

goonerbynature
06-21-2009, 11:04 AM
I think one of your best bets would be an Ibanez GRGM Mikro. But maybe you should wait a year or so before starting him on electric guitar, because his fingers might still be a bit soft and they'll hurt. If you want to play together, may be you should just get another Microcube?

ColdGin
06-21-2009, 11:39 AM
I gave a cheap SX, full 24.75'' scale, fixed bridge, Les Paul like electric guitar to each of my nephews 2 and half years ago, when they were respectively 7 and 9, and signed them up for 2 30 min lessons a week in a nearby music school. I also gave them 2 10-15 watt amps, a Dan Electro and a Crate GX. The school teachers fully supported the idea of NOT getting them used to shorter scale guitars. The guitars had extra light strings

They haven't learned anything about chords in their first year, just learning to fret, slide and hit notes and tie notes together to play riffs, play in time, understand rythm, song key, major and minor scales, and read scores. That's already a busy agenda for a kid. The idea is to get their little fingers working and getting them the tools to progress by themselves.

After that first year, both kids were able to correctly play the intro riff to Sweet Child of Mine and to work out simple scores by themselves.

Eventually, in their second year, kids learn 2 and 3 string barres and how to build 2 and 3 notes chords.

Today, they both can play 3 and 4 note chords without the use of 5 or 6 string barres and are able to correctly play simple tunes say by the White Stripes, ZZ Top and some RHCP.

They've played their first 4 song outdoor public concert this week end, after forming bands with other school students and learning and working on the songs for 2 months.

The younger one has made it a point to learn how to shred la Steve Vai, which he now positively does.

divortium
06-21-2009, 11:56 AM
They've played their first 4 song outdoor public concert this week end, after forming bands with other school students and learning and working on the songs for 2 months.
That's actually a great story, ColdGin, and my favourite post in this thread so far. Thanks for sharing! Glad to hear they're making progress, and most importantly, having fun. They sound dedicated and quite mature, and they also sound like their teachers are providing them with good musical fundamentals.

But if I may be allowed to play devil's advocate for a moment, learning to actually play is a lot easier when the kids are a little older. Kids with near-adult sized fingers can be playing four or five string barres and basic leads within a week. I'm still of the opinion that theoretical training is the most important facet of musical instruction in the childhood demographic. The difference between a mental head start and a physical one is enormous. If your kids are ready for it, by all means, get them on an axe. I started late (I was twelve), but when I did, I caught up physically in a couple weeks. Theory-wise, I had to do a lot of painful self-teaching.

Although I'd like to apologise to the OP for a moment, as all of my posts have been utterly unhelpful to his plight.

ColdGin
06-21-2009, 01:54 PM
They sound dedicated and quite mature...,

But if I may be allowed to play devil's advocate for a moment, learning to actually play is a lot easier when the kids are a little older...

I started late (I was twelve),...


At 9 years old, timing was right for the oldest when he started.

For the younger brother at 7 y, the question did come up but the younger always made it a point to show he could do what the older could and best him.

Giving a guitar to only the older brother would have been disastrous.

Eventually, the school teachers thought of a lighter, taylored program for the younger one, focusing on getting him familiar with and enjoying the instrument but after just a few months he was already asking how to play RHCP's Under the Bridge and Yankee Rose so they put him back in the regular classes with kids who were older by only 1 or 2 years.

I'm still of the opinion that theoretical training is the most important facet of musical instruction in the childhood demographic.
Agreed! That's also the focus of the music school they're attending. But theory is quickly forgotten without time spent putting it to practice. That's why it takes them 2 years to learn just how chords are built and they're relation with scales. To make sure, the underlying notions are fully and correctly acquired.

Punk_Ninja
06-21-2009, 01:58 PM
I'd get him a full sized guitar, he'll be growing a lot in his next few years so the small guitar will probably only last him til he's 10 or so (I was playing full size at 12 and it was the right size, I was quite small too) so unless you plan on replacing the guitar at that point (which is a possibility, guitarists get GAS so quickly, even when young :p: ) then I'd get full size.

Otherwise all the small guitars have really been mentioned, there aren't that many around.
But I'd suggest the squier, if it's anything like a regular strat, very moddable :D