Core in the '00s


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One on Sunday
11-30-2009, 06:10 PM
Hey guys, I'm writing an article for a music publication on how hardcore/metalcore/whatevercore have progressed (or regressed...) in the past decade, and it would be cool to have some extra insight from the forum.

So just give me your opinions of the highs points, the low points, the key moments, the new sounds that emerged, specific bands/albums that really revolutionized the genre (and why), the aesthetic, and the change in your personal feelings on the genre over the last 10 years. Or really anything else that you'd think would be important to cover in the last decade of hardcore. Try to be intelligent in your replies pl0x

Thanks, this'll really help with research for my article.

Feel free to turn this into an open discussion on your thoughts about hardcore in the last decade. Be sure to answer some of my questions in the discussion at least

MustangMan311
11-30-2009, 06:16 PM
There's been a huge commercialization of "hardcore" with bands like Underoath- I figure that would be the biggest thing to talk about.

boffen
11-30-2009, 06:24 PM
Every artist which got like five seconds of screaming or a breakdown get labeled hardcore or screamo these days. I listen to loads of the newer core-bands, but I'm still pissed when I see all these bands being tagged as Hardcore and Screamo on last.fm.

When you ask something what they listen to and they are like "metal and hardcore and screamocore and stuff" and you ask them what bands they like and they say "Avenged Sevenfold" I want to punch them in the face.

ItWillDo
11-30-2009, 06:29 PM
Alright, although I do hope you understand that every answer here will merely be ones opinion, I'll contribute.


As you know, -core emerged from early hardcore punk. Now personally, I don't like punk, hardcore punk and usually I don't even like hardcore. I used to be a huge thrash/ Göthenburg fan until I discovered the wonderful world of metalcore. It has the melodic riffs of Göthenburg metal, and offers the awesome 'distorted' vocals of death metal.

The thing I like most about metalcore is how it usually also carries technical playing and sometimes even intriguing lyrics. And as I've been listening to metalcore, my desire for more progressive music kept growing until I discovered what I'm looking for. I guess I could call this the "pinacle" of my '-core'-preference. 'Melodic Progressive Deathcore' AKA "Sumeriancore". Though Sumeriancore isn't the actual genre (for now it isn't atleast), it is a brilliant way to say what kind of bands you like. When you think of Sumeriancore, you think of the label it refers to (Sumerian Records that is), and so immediatly think of brilliant bands like Born Of Osiris, Veil of Maya, The Faceless (Which is more of a Death Metal band) , Conducting From The Grave and of course After The Burial. These are all 5 incredibly skilled and talented bands with amazing technical skills and a writing skill even Barry Shwartz would envy.

Sumeriancore isn't limited to bands signed to the label though, this also includes bands like The Red Chord, Within The Ruins and The Boy Will Drown which are all signed to a different label. Also a little thing to add here, I believe The Red Chord is known to have "popularized" the deathcore-genre. So I guess you could surely mention them. (Not to forget that their latest album is one ****ing brilliant piece of art)


That's about it I guess, if you still have any questions or anything, feel free to ask.

technicolour
11-30-2009, 06:30 PM
core is still alive and well.

handbanana
11-30-2009, 07:39 PM
No Warning and Blacklisted

IcePh0enix
11-30-2009, 07:56 PM
read up on/write about:
-Deathwish records
-Converge, Have Heart, Blacklisted
-big bands breaking up and forming
-hardcore bands breaking into the mainstream, as well as diy outlets
-the pop-punkcore explosion
-Bridge 9 and the new youth crew/straight edge bands
-New York style hardcore
-the emergence of metalcore and deathcore
-Boston, Philly, Baltimore, New York, Los Angelos, anywhere else with a decent scene

That should cover a lot, hope this post helps.

handbanana
11-30-2009, 08:01 PM
^new york style hardcore broke out in the 90s, along with a few of the other things you mentioned

IcePh0enix
11-30-2009, 08:04 PM
Yeah I'm not really talking about the creation of it, more about current bands that utilize these styles and their influence on the modern hardcore scene.

tancanada
11-30-2009, 08:40 PM
You should write a whole paragraph on attack attack and the crabcore movement, just for the lulz

and @ItWillDo, be careful about Sumerian, they have bands like Asking Alexandria on there

One on Sunday
11-30-2009, 08:43 PM
I definitely will write about the "crabcore" movement (well not exactly on crabcore, but mostly about scene-core). Its probably gonna be the largest section, as its one of the most prevalent and controversial parts of hardcore of the decade.

tancanada
11-30-2009, 08:47 PM
I definitely will write about the "crabcore" movement (well not exactly on crabcore, but mostly about scene-core). Its probably gonna be the largest section, as its one of the most prevalent and controversial parts of hardcore of the decade.

Whenever you get done with your first draft you should post it here, Id like to read it :)

nashawa
11-30-2009, 09:06 PM
Talk about the misconception with the mainstream media that core kids like bands ONLY because they're underground. I get this comment all the time, and it's totally untrue, as most of you will probably agree. it doesn't matter how popular the band is as long as they make good music. Converge are breaking into mainstream metal (because they don't know what to call it), as is Coalesce to a lesser degree...

zezimathehero
11-30-2009, 09:10 PM
talk about Jane Doe. And i guess the pop punk-hardcore crossover, the explosion of christian metalcore bands, hot topic bands, and the explosion of deathcore bands. And Jane Doe. Pretty much everything everyone else has said.

MustangMan311
11-30-2009, 09:23 PM
Sumeriancore isn't limited to bands signed to the label though, this also includes bands like The Red Chord
Don't want to hijack the thread, but seriously? The Red Chord pre-dates Sumerian and any of the bands on the label itself by at least a couple of years. I like Sumerian bands, but don't belittle the Red Chord by calling them that, especially when they have nothing in common with any of the bands that should be labeled "Sumeriancore" in the first place.

One on Sunday
11-30-2009, 09:36 PM
Ok, good responses so far!

Question: Whats one of the first bands to popularize the use of electronics in metalcore? Underoath-esque, but i need another example of an early 2000s band who was a pioneer of it.

zezimathehero
11-30-2009, 09:44 PM
HORSE the band maybe?

MustangMan311
11-30-2009, 09:55 PM
Ok, good responses so far!

Question: Whats one of the first bands to popularize the use of electronics in metalcore? Underoath-esque, but i need another example of an early 2000s band who was a pioneer of it.
I personally don't think the influence of electronics came out of the hardcore scene, but other scenes leaking into it. Especially as of lately- All the autotune use and synths are straight out of the new "R&B" stuff.

JxD
11-30-2009, 10:51 PM
Ok, good responses so far!

Question: Whats one of the first bands to popularize the use of electronics in metalcore? Underoath-esque, but i need another example of an early 2000s band who was a pioneer of it.
The idea of mixing synth and hardcore isn't an idea unique to the most recent decade. Hardcore bands were doing it in the mid-90's (ex. The Locust) and they took their cues from experimental rock bands so I would say it was something that gradually began to blend into hardcore.

I think you have a lot of research to do. I would recommend learning the origins of metalcore, seeing as how you're largely dealing with a catch-phrase that has been hijacked of late, the book Burning Fight is a pretty good place to start. If you don't want to do that I suppose reading about bands like Integrity, Shai Hulud, Converge, and Unbroken will suffice. You might want to check out some information on labels like Bridge Nine and Deathwish, being that they're extremely important right now, and labels like Revelation and Ebullition, who have been important steadily for the passed 20-odd years.

If you want to talk about the revolution of the genre, you probably won't find many groundbreaking ideas after the turn of the millennium. The important movements in hardcore happened in the 80's and 90's. That's not to say quality has decreased or that bands lack originality, I'm merely saying that the scene has not had a significant and original revitalization for a number of years.

Internal Chaos
12-01-2009, 04:58 AM
Modern Life is War - Witness

handbanana
12-01-2009, 12:22 PM
someone else made a similar thread on another forum. good topic.

i still say the best bands to come out of the 00's were No Warning, Blacklisted, and probably American Nightmare. And everything converge has put out since 2000 has been pretty stellar.

Valderama
12-01-2009, 01:45 PM
I'm doing something similar for my SSI.
Im writing about how Hardcore has developed since 1990, in terms of sub-genres, fashion, live performance, social categories etc.
Some pretty useful stuff in here already (Y)

MustangMan311
12-01-2009, 11:18 PM
Im writing about how Hardcore has developed since 1990, in terms of fashion,

:rolleyes:

pmeg568c
12-01-2009, 11:26 PM
I'm doing something similar for my SSI.
Im writing about how Hardcore has developed since 1990, in terms of sub-genres, fashion, live performance, social categories etc.
Some pretty useful stuff in here already (Y)

yea except the stuff you write about isnt hardcore. hardcore has nothing to do with fashion or social categories

Magero
12-02-2009, 12:27 AM
Fashion can refer to just general styles of dress, not a specific scene.
The fashion in the metal scene is normally black shirts, camo pants and long hair, doesn't mean it's a prerequisite or "what the genre is about".

PhobiXa
12-02-2009, 01:22 AM
If you need a band with electronics talk about Rolo Tomassi. also there are loads of bands that use them and sound poppy such as House vs Hurricane, and probably a bunch of local bands.

Talk about the lack of political talk and serious content in lyrics of mainstream hardcore/metalcore/moshcore/etc. The watering down of hardcore in recent years.
Probably include that emo phase from a few years back when "emo" was all over TV and malls were full of kids in black and guys with eyeliner.

The emergence of the mosh and deathcore and synthcore bands, and from there the commercialization of hardcore.

The effect the internet has had on the hardcore scene. Its effect on DIY ethics, fashion, audience, accessibility.

Could probably talk about crust punk and how it is becoming more like black metal and vice versa. This would tie in to the idea of metal and hardcore becoming closer as time progresses.

handbanana
12-02-2009, 02:34 PM
I'm doing something similar for my SSI.
Im writing about how Hardcore has developed since 1990, in terms of sub-genres, fashion, live performance, social categories etc.
Some pretty useful stuff in here already (Y)



just remember that attack attack and as i lay dying aren't 90's hardcore bands

nashawa
12-02-2009, 03:35 PM
just remember that attack attack and as i lay dying aren't 90's hardcore bands
Schnap!

Manos15
12-02-2009, 03:58 PM
just remember that attack attack and as i lay dying aren't 90's hardcore bands
Got 'em!

Valderama
12-03-2009, 08:56 AM
yea except the stuff you write about isnt hardcore. hardcore has nothing to do with fashion or social categories
:haha

Fashion can refer to just general styles of dress, not a specific scene.
The fashion in the metal scene is normally black shirts, camo pants and long hair, doesn't mean it's a prerequisite or "what the genre is about".
I mean it in the sense of anything remotely related, i.e. What was in fashion at a certain period of time and how that related to the goings-on in the Hardcore Scene at the time. Its supposed to be a detailed dissertation of sorts, so almost anything is relevant, its actually kinda fun to do aswell.

just remember that attack attack and as i lay dying aren't 90's hardcore bands
srsly? Oh no! I just assumed they were all broke and in their 30s.
PLEASE DETECT THE SARCASM, I BEG OF YOU.

Like I said, its a dissertation on development, so i will be using the 90s scene as a basis if you will.

No need to be an arse.

MustangMan311
12-03-2009, 10:41 AM
No need to be an arse.
...So why are you?

+}-136-{+
12-03-2009, 11:09 AM
The idea of mixing synth and hardcore isn't an idea unique to the most recent decade. Hardcore bands were doing it in the mid-90's (ex. The Locust) and they took their cues from experimental rock bands so I would say it was something that gradually began to blend into hardcore.

I think you have a lot of research to do. I would recommend learning the origins of metalcore, seeing as how you're largely dealing with a catch-phrase that has been hijacked of late, the book Burning Fight is a pretty good place to start. If you don't want to do that I suppose reading about bands like Integrity, Shai Hulud, Converge, and Unbroken will suffice. You might want to check out some information on labels like Bridge Nine and Deathwish, being that they're extremely important right now, and labels like Revelation and Ebullition, who have been important steadily for the passed 20-odd years.

If you want to talk about the revolution of the genre, you probably won't find many groundbreaking ideas after the turn of the millennium. The important movements in hardcore happened in the 80's and 90's. That's not to say quality has decreased or that bands lack originality, I'm merely saying that the scene has not had a significant and original revitalization for a number of years.

Listen to this man. He knows his shit.

That is all.

Oh yeah, and guys, let's not turn an otherwise decent thread into a shit-flinging fest. Please.

nashawa
12-03-2009, 11:25 AM
Oh yeah, and guys, let's not turn an otherwise decent thread into a shit-flinging fest. Please.
We try our best to keep that concentrated to the crabcore threads, or, I do at least.

Haymaker17
12-03-2009, 11:27 AM
The idea of mixing synth and hardcore isn't an idea unique to the most recent decade. Hardcore bands were doing it in the mid-90's (ex. The Locust) and they took their cues from experimental rock bands so I would say it was something that gradually began to blend into hardcore.

I think you have a lot of research to do. I would recommend learning the origins of metalcore, seeing as how you're largely dealing with a catch-phrase that has been hijacked of late, the book Burning Fight is a pretty good place to start. If you don't want to do that I suppose reading about bands like Integrity, Shai Hulud, Converge, and Unbroken will suffice. You might want to check out some information on labels like Bridge Nine and Deathwish, being that they're extremely important right now, and labels like Revelation and Ebullition, who have been important steadily for the passed 20-odd years.

If you want to talk about the revolution of the genre, you probably won't find many groundbreaking ideas after the turn of the millennium. The important movements in hardcore happened in the 80's and 90's. That's not to say quality has decreased or that bands lack originality, I'm merely saying that the scene has not had a significant and original revitalization for a number of years.


you are the man

ChemicalFire
12-03-2009, 11:29 AM
If I were being pedantic, wouldn't Suicidal Tenancies be the only 'true' metal core band... as it was a mix of Thrash metal and New York Hardcore?

JxD
12-03-2009, 12:16 PM
If I were being pedantic, wouldn't Suicidal Tenancies be the only 'true' metal core band... as it was a mix of Thrash metal and New York Hardcore?
No.

handbanana
12-03-2009, 12:17 PM
If I were being pedantic, wouldn't Suicidal Tenancies be the only 'true' metal core band... as it was a mix of Thrash metal and New York Hardcore?


wtf are you talking about?

Manos15
12-03-2009, 01:25 PM
Modern Life is War - Witness
One of the best hardcore albums of this decade.

Valderama
12-03-2009, 04:04 PM
If I were being pedantic, wouldn't Suicidal Tenancies be the only 'true' metal core band... as it was a mix of Thrash metal and New York Hardcore?
eh?
The actual definition of metalcore is merely the literal meaning - metal + hardcore.
Whereas nowadays, that literal meaning is pretty useless, mainstream attention and whatnot have pretty much morphed it into something else. To put it very briefly, not as heavy as Deathcore, but not as "happy" (for lack of a better word) as pop punk / some types of Post-Hardcore.
As you can see, i'm showing no opinion here.

...So why are you?
Settle down son.
I have a genuine interest in this thread, useful stuff for me.

lookpizza
12-03-2009, 04:33 PM
If I were being pedantic, wouldn't Suicidal Tenancies be the only 'true' metal core band... as it was a mix of Thrash metal and New York Hardcore?

That wouldn't be being pedantic, that would be being wrong.

CaptinSpalldin
12-03-2009, 08:05 PM
What about all the more proggy bands that started coming out after the big metalcore explosion, e.x. BTBAM?

ImSteve
12-09-2009, 12:30 AM
What about all the more proggy bands that started coming out after the big metalcore explosion, e.x. BTBAM?


It gets to a point where the topic is far too broad to even begin to write about.

There also becomes a point where bands are just metal bands, regardless of what they claim to be, they are playing metal.



The biggest issue of the 00's is that no one really stands for anything anymore. I don't consider myself jaded by any means but very few bands take a stand on anything. Bands now don't have the longevity of old bands because they lack substance that older bands had. Does anyone seriously think that bands like Ruiner (Not to call them out specifically, but just bands like them) will be around in even 5 years? Probably not. The music isn't bad but there isn't any real unifying factor behind it.

Look at bands are being remembered and what will you find? Strong values that they are remembered for.

NYHC bands are remembered for Unity and Skinhead
Youth Crew Bands are remember for Straight Edge and Unity (Sometimes Veganism)
Not sure what to call them (Bands like Sheer Terror and their offspring) were known for realistic lyrics, about being raised in shitty environments, being screwed over by life, whatever.
The 90s bands best remembered are known for hardline beliefs.

What do we have today? Bands the exist solely on being "heavy". This isn't to say it's all bad, I have a feeling Lockin' Out records will be remembered for a long time to come because they are one of the only remaining "crews" in the original sense of the term (friends playing in bands/hanging out I.E the Boston Crew of the 80s).

The majority of what people see as "hardcore" lacks the substance that it used to.


Edit: Just realized how scatterbrained that sounded. I'm tired, sorry!

BGSM
12-09-2009, 02:20 AM
To put it very briefly, not as heavy as Deathcore, but not as "happy" (for lack of a better word) as pop punk / some types of Post-Hardcore.

oh god.

and that's a quality post steve, I agree with most of that when talking about the more mainstream -core bands, but there are still plenty of hardcore bands around today that reflect their real life struggles in their music (flogging the dead horse, but converge for example). i totally agree with this about PILES of local deathcore bands though, there are so many shitty deathcore bands aroundwhere the members are living perfectly good lives and being in a deathcore band because it's br00tal. /rant about hating the local scene

Valderama
12-10-2009, 12:12 PM
^ If you read my whole post, I was referring to what Metalcore has evolved into (or at least, what one branch of Metalcore; that being the whole Melodic Metalcore thing) over the past decade, I wasn't putting that description forward as my own opinion; because it certainly isn't. Just how a large amount of Metalcore fans tend to view it when they have only been exposed to what bands are recieving Mainstream attention.

recklessnick
12-10-2009, 12:41 PM
core in the 00s.
converge, shai hulud, have heart, champion, give up the ghost, modern life is war
fullstop influence.

nashawa
12-10-2009, 02:06 PM
^Not all of those bands started up this decade though.

Magero
12-10-2009, 08:50 PM
Most released their classic albums in the 00's though.

nashawa
12-10-2009, 09:02 PM
^Fair enough

ItWillDo
12-11-2009, 01:46 PM
Don't want to hijack the thread, but seriously? The Red Chord pre-dates Sumerian and any of the bands on the label itself by at least a couple of years. I like Sumerian bands, but don't belittle the Red Chord by calling them that, especially when they have nothing in common with any of the bands that should be labeled "Sumeriancore" in the first place.
Yeah I meant Within The Ruins, but I was thinking and listening to The Red Chords so that might've lead to this mistake.

Either way, I think it would be more of an honor than belittling, especially after listening to Prey for Eyes.

MustangMan311
12-11-2009, 05:22 PM
Yeah I meant Within The Ruins, but I was thinking and listening to The Red Chords so that might've lead to this mistake.

Either way, I think it would be more of an honor than belittling, especially after listening to Prey for Eyes.
Hahahahaha. The only album Sumerian records has put out that even comes close to touching a Red Chord album is Planetary Duality.

ItWillDo
12-13-2009, 02:35 PM
Hahahahaha. The only album Sumerian records has put out that even comes close to touching a Red Chord album is Planetary Duality.
Sounds like your taste in music is a joke.

tylerh918
12-13-2009, 04:43 PM
There's a few newer bands that wouldn't be a bad idea to mention at the very least like Defeater is one of the only hardcore bands I know of (not to say that there aren't any other bands out there) that does concept albums. Champion and some of the older youth crew bands wouldn't be bad to mention. Maybe bands from outside of North America Or the UK like The Geeks would be a nice topic to cover. There's also older bands that used to be extremely popular that are now lacking somewhat in their newer albums like Terror. Also it might be a good idea to mention how the genre hardcore is extremely loose nowadays because so many kids falsely throw it around calling bands like atreyu and chiodos hardore.

zezimathehero
12-13-2009, 04:44 PM
Sounds like your taste in music is a joke.
says the "sumeriancore elitist"

Lappo
12-13-2009, 06:55 PM
Sounds like your taste in music is a joke.News flash: the only good bands on Sumerian don't play a variant of 'Sumeriancore'.

MustangMan311
12-13-2009, 07:25 PM
Sounds like your taste in music is a joke.
You mean just like the term "Sumeriancore"?

Most of the bands on Sumerian wouldn't even have a deathcore genre to come home and cry to if it weren't for the Red Chord, so you can suck my ****.

recklessnick
12-13-2009, 11:21 PM
ok. what the **** is sumeriancore? is it some crabcore shit again?

MustangMan311
12-13-2009, 11:37 PM
ok. what the **** is sumeriancore? is it some crabcore shit again?
All of the bands on Sumerian that sound like variants of other Sumerian bands.

ItWillDo
12-16-2009, 08:06 PM
Haha alright kids. Once you drop the whole "brutal scene" stuff and realize there is more to music than breakdowns and powerchords, try revisiting the thread.

zezimathehero
12-16-2009, 08:09 PM
again, says the "sumericancore elitist"

birdman267
12-16-2009, 08:12 PM
^The "brutal scene" stuff could actually fit in this paper,
It has become quite the trend in the core genres this past decade.

nashawa
12-16-2009, 08:18 PM
Sounds like your taste in music is a joke.
Dr. Acula is signed to Sumerian. I dunno, just sayin'

Manos15
12-16-2009, 08:30 PM
I had no idea what Sumeriancore was until this thread. Upon looking at their website, I see they have the worst list of scene bands imaginable.

birdman267
12-16-2009, 08:37 PM
I had no idea what Sumeriancore was until this thread. Upon looking at their website, I see they have the worst list of scene bands imaginable.


Not to pick sides in this argument but,
BOO, Veil of Maya and The Faceless are on that list.
Hardly scene bands.

nashawa
12-16-2009, 08:39 PM
^but Dr. Acula is, so...

Manos15
12-16-2009, 08:41 PM
Not to pick sides in this argument but,
BOO, Veil of Maya and The Faceless are on that list.
Hardly scene bands.
I See Stars
Upon a Burning Body
Abacabb

A bunch of other bands with names and fonts that appear very "scene."

birdman267
12-16-2009, 08:43 PM
Okay okay.
True.

The word list just made me assume
all of the bands were scene bands a la I See Stars.

Magero
12-16-2009, 09:42 PM
Haha alright kids. Once you drop the whole "brutal scene" stuff and realize there is more to music than breakdowns and powerchords, try revisiting the thread.
Stop listening to Born of Osiris. They're clearly giving you the impression that people give a shit about what you say.

technicolour
12-16-2009, 10:17 PM
Haha alright kids. Once you drop the whole "brutal scene" stuff and realize there is more to music than breakdowns and powerchords, try revisiting the thread.

Wait what :confused:

MustangMan311
12-16-2009, 11:29 PM
If anything, Born of Osiris is the biggest scene hit EVER. "Hey guys, you wanna hear a sick breakdown? And it starts with the F-word! Let's go dance and straighten our hair!"

output24
12-17-2009, 12:13 AM
Talk about how hardcore is actually progressing . People wants to talk about how it isn't like the past anymore,but seriusly, there's STILL a lot of fcking awesome bands out there. Of course, there's Minor Threat, Minutemen, Circle Jerks, Bad Brains, and all those pioneers. What they did was BIG, but isn't this what they wanted? To make music for kids who are tired of the mainstream? And isn't it happening today? Lots of bands, lots of outlets for hardcore kids, lots of reasons for the pioneers to smile about.

So go ahead, talk about Verse, Bane, Champion, Have Heart, Ruiner, and your favorite hardcore band that people will surely diss. Ian Mackye will be proud, because you fcking wrote what you want about without thinking about what will others think of you. Yes, that's the very essence of hardcore.

HxC for life.

nashawa
12-17-2009, 12:43 AM
If anything, Born of Osiris is the biggest scene hit EVER. "Hey guys, you wanna hear a sick breakdown? And it starts with the F-word! Let's go dance and straighten our hair!"
I straighten my hair :sad:

At the moment it's quite fluffy though.

It's funny, because I look kinda scene, but the music I listen to is sooo far removed from it that it's not even funny. Fashion hypocrite? Perhaps.

You know what? Fuck that. I burned my fucking forehead yesterday straightening my hair and now I have a small scar. Scars are hXc! I'm still hXc!!!

cakeschmammert
12-17-2009, 01:03 AM
i've gotta admit, after the burial is a good band.

zezimathehero
12-17-2009, 01:28 AM
I still listen to after the burial and the faceless. And when Veil of Maya and Periphery release their albums i'll probably listen to them for a bit. The rest of Sumerian is so overwhelmingly scene/mediocre that it actually pains me a bit.

Magero
12-17-2009, 02:54 AM
Scars are hXc! I'm still hXc!!!
Scarredcore?

nashawa
12-17-2009, 03:22 AM
Scarredcore indeed.

ItWillDo
12-17-2009, 08:01 AM
:haha: :haha: :haha:

That's great! All the bands on Sumerian fit perectly in the brutal scene. There not doing anything original of groundbreaking there actually generic that's why all the bands on Sumerian sound the same. That's why you have that stupid ****ing genre. There just really technical get you head outta your ass and listen to more then one genre of music lose the attitude and then revisit the thread alright kid. I like most of these bands but your a prick so...
There is something seriously wrong with the structure of your sentences. Either you're addressing me, or you're addressing the people you agree with. Anyway, just get a basic idea of structuring.

And everything aside, I'd still rather listen to ABACABB than Between The Buried And Me. If any band is really 'trying' to be scene, it's them.

Magero
12-17-2009, 10:20 AM
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

FUCKIN' BOW DOWN

Yeah, they're totally not pandering to any market.

MustangMan311
12-17-2009, 10:22 AM
And everything aside, I'd still rather listen to ABACABB than Between The Buried And Me. If any band is really 'trying' to be scene, it's them.
Holy ****ing shit.
I'm going to assume this is a cultural difference, since you're from Belgium.

The pure amount of bros that ABACABB brings out in comparison to how many BTBAM does (Zero) isn't even funny. BTBAM might be trying a little too hard, but they're aren't trying to be scene. If anyone's scene (and generic as SHIT), it's the one with lyrics like this:
You selfish bitch, how could you
do this to me? You selfish bitch,
You will regret this.

boffen
12-17-2009, 10:26 AM
Wtf is ABaCBXBABCBABABCVBABABSA?

ChemicalFire
12-17-2009, 10:27 AM
FUCKIN' BOW DOWN



I've heard way better break downs :\

Magero
12-17-2009, 10:28 AM
A random string of letters you typed indiscriminately hit.

ABACABB is a pseudo deathcore band of infinite boringidity.
And the cheat for more gore in Mortal Kombat.

nashawa
12-17-2009, 02:02 PM
And everything aside, I'd still rather listen to ABACABB than Between The Buried And Me. If any band is really 'trying' to be scene, it's them.
BTBAM are trying to be scene? They're failing pretty horribly in that respect then, don't you think?

Dregen
12-17-2009, 02:07 PM
And everything aside, I'd still rather listen to ABACABB than Between The Buried And Me. If any band is really 'trying' to be scene, it's them.

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(my first lolstack, you've earned it)