Bandleading Experience


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Vendetta V
12-17-2009, 04:56 PM
Hey guys let's share our experience what to do what not to do..
hmm it's really hard to learn everything and each time you find out more stuff

so...
hmm id say always use cable ties... learn the set by heart... and use back ups.. that's the quick 2 cents of mine...
ima think up more.. but gotta run... cya later

isabiggles
12-17-2009, 04:58 PM
Don't insult your band members, even in moments of intense rage.

Gakbez
12-17-2009, 05:05 PM
Agreed, if they are feeling a bit cranky, keep it low on them. Also, if they are retarded again, count to 10 and try again

Rizzo228
12-17-2009, 05:06 PM
Do not, not practice before a two hour set to make sure you got the time filled out..

hawk_kst
12-17-2009, 05:07 PM
1) Don't just stand like a statue, I know getting the song right is important but if people want to just listen to it they'll buy your album or E.P. IT'S A SHOW.
2) Don't say anything negative about any person in the band or a song...
3) If you know you've made a mistake or someone else has then don't make it obvious more than it already is...
4) Talk to the audience more than giving your band name and track names.
5) Never forget to introduce yourselves at the beginning of the set and at the end of the set including info such as band name, website + where to buy your stuff.
6) Don't get too drunk or high- IT WON'T END WELL (regardless who else "can do it")
7) Make sure your tight as a band- LOTS OF PRACTISE,
8) Try to look like your enjoying yourself, you may be but if your not smiling and looking happy your audience won't know it...

there's so many more but.... there's a few!

imaginary.frnd
12-17-2009, 05:14 PM
Do not start tuning your guitar up, down, sideways, back and forth in the middle of a song..especially if u r high.

SomeoneYouKnew
12-17-2009, 05:32 PM
You can solve almost every problem if you have enough duct tape.

axemanchris
12-18-2009, 12:36 AM
1. The band is not YOU. It's everyone else, including you.
2. Don't be manipulative.
3. Money is the great persuader, and the answer to many of your questions.
4. Play nice with people. The pimply n00b doing sound may one day be the head of Sony Entertainment.
5. What goes up must come down. That means that the people you screw over on your way up, WILL be waiting for you when you return to earth.
6. Great songs beats great technical prowess.
7. The younger your market, the more important image is.
8. If you want to make it, you can't do it part time.
9. If it sounds good, it IS good. Nobody really cares who makes it, and nobody really cares how you did it.
10. Your competition is NOT the other indie bands in your town. Your competition is Green Day, Celine Dion, Elton John, Nickelback, and Miley Cyrus. Because in the end, people don't have special budget lines for "local indie music." They have a willingness to spend their time and money on "music."

CT

Vendetta V
12-18-2009, 04:42 PM
agreed with all

hell yeah money.. that helps a lot..

h mm yeah i can say the band is not YOU only or anybody else the Band gotta work like one whole organism.. tied up....!!!!

hmm always have some spare songs so if the audience asks for an encore or for some reason you dont want to play a particular song you'll have a place to back off

always talk nice to the band people but if your the leader let them understand that it's not a joke or fun having thing.. it's fun combined with a work so dont loose time on jerking around..
let them know who's who in the band so nobody grows EGO-bastard kind of person...

dullsilver_mike
12-18-2009, 04:57 PM
1. The more quietly you practice, the tighter, more dynamic, and and balanced you will be as a band.
2. Creating a good vibe requires sensitivity and perceptiveness. As fun as making music is, the human dynamics of even a recreational band involve a fair bit of stress, emotion, and physical exertion. If you just pay attention to each other and listen carefully, you can make your work environment many times more comfortable and productive.--from how often to have a break to what kind of seating your rehearsal space has.
3.Record yourself at practice and gigs and use that to critique yourself.
4.Listen to everyone's input, but make it clear when an idea won't work with a song, set, etc.
5. Don't be afraid to throw away stuff you've been working on.

axemanchris
12-18-2009, 06:31 PM
^golfclap!

isabiggles
12-18-2009, 07:21 PM
Two above^

number 1 is so true.

EDIT:

Because it means you start listening out for everything, it works on your ear nicely.

(well for me)

It also doesn't upset neighbours and won't deafen you :p:

DOUBLEEDIT:

A really useful thing to have is a facebook message thing going with all the band members in it. It means you can all leave messages to the whole band and it's on facebook which people see all the time. Honestly, it was so useful for my old band. You can also reference it for band times, setlists etc.

axemanchris
12-18-2009, 08:45 PM
Good idea ^.

What we do is have an email address set up that, when an email is sent to it, it forwards the same email message to everyone in the band. We don't mail anyone individually. Everyone gets the same message, so there is no "well you told ME this and HIM that" sort of thing.

In any case, consistent communication is key.

CT

editthesadparts
12-19-2009, 03:52 PM
Gigs:
Make sure your amp is working properly. (And that you don't have to ****ing run back to it every minute to adjust the god damn tape that's keeping your cable in because the amp keeps cutting out. ****.)

After the show, if someone says, "You guys were great!" say, "Thanks, I'm glad you enjoyed it!". Not, "Really? I thought we sucked. The bassist kept making stupid faces and our drummer played too loud.".

Tape. Tapetapetapetapetape****INGBRINGTAPE!

Always have extra cables, picks, strings, drum sticks, etc...

Before you leave the house, always make sure you have everything you need. Just the other day I had to run home to grab my patch cables 10 minutes before we went on stage. Not fun.

Practice:
Practice as often as possible.

Schedule practices on days when everyone is free. For example, my band practices every Tuesday and Sunday (And sometimes extra days when everyone is free) so that nobody can say, "I can't practice, I made plans." on those days.

Record your practices occasionally.

Don't get into volume wars. If your guitarist is too loud, tell him, don't turn yourself up.

Let everyone have a say in everything.

SomeoneYouKnew
12-19-2009, 04:33 PM
Practice:
Practice as often as possible.I found the rest of your post to be really good. It touched on several important issues. This part is basically good too. But I also disagree with it, to some degree.

Practicing (individually) or rehearsing (as a band) is important and necessary. But there can be too much of a good thing. If you're only focused on the frequency and amount of time invested, it's easy for practice/rehearsals to become stale and counter-productive.


Better to "right-size" the amount of time and use it in the most efficient manner.
Quality > quantity.

Yeah?

smartalec007
12-19-2009, 04:35 PM
Bring doubles of everything, espcially picks and cables.
Have someone bring a double of the dumbass in the bands stuff (we all have one).
make sure that you can fit everything in the car before hand. If you don't, you shouldn't be surprised when your amp wont fit in only an hour before you need to get to the gig.
have a facebook page that everyone can look at.
you don't need to practice super loud.
try not to use 9 volts for the pedals as they have the chance of dying in the middle of your face melting solo, making it so that no one heard it.
don't just stand still during the whole show, people want to see some cool stuff going on, or else they would be at home, in the dark, just listening to your album or EP.

Vendetta V
12-19-2009, 05:08 PM
always gather with your band before going to the venue... in an hour prior (at least)
always talk who'll wear what on the gig so it wont be a chaotic mascaraed... it'll turn into asscarade

hehe
hhmm
ima say always discuss all the stuff or even sign a contract with the bar/venue... it can end up bad.. like you having to pay money cause the amount of people was to little...

isabiggles
12-19-2009, 05:29 PM
Gigs:
Make sure your amp is working properly. (And that you don't have to ****ing run back to it every minute to adjust the god damn tape that's keeping your cable in because the amp keeps cutting out. ****.)

After the show, if someone says, "You guys were great!" say, "Thanks, I'm glad you enjoyed it!". Not, "Really? I thought we sucked. The bassist kept making stupid faces and our drummer played too loud.".

Tape. Tapetapetapetapetape****INGBRINGTAPE!

Always have extra cables, picks, strings, drum sticks, etc...

Before you leave the house, always make sure you have everything you need. Just the other day I had to run home to grab my patch cables 10 minutes before we went on stage. Not fun.

Practice:
Practice as often as possible.

Schedule practices on days when everyone is free. For example, my band practices every Tuesday and Sunday (And sometimes extra days when everyone is free) so that nobody can say, "I can't practice, I made plans." on those days.

Record your practices occasionally.

Don't get into volume wars. If your guitarist is too loud, tell him, don't turn yourself up.

Let everyone have a say in everything.

+6billion

Bolded in particular. If you have a select day or days then people won't start scheduling things for those days and you can keep consistency which is important.

Myshadow46_2
12-19-2009, 06:43 PM
Learn to communicate effectively and make sure any criticism is constructive. E.g. don't be afraid to tell your drummer that you don't think he's using enough cowbell, but make sure you tell him why.

This should nip problems\issues in the bud before they escalate. E.g. if the guitarist regularly doesn't show up for scheduled practices, talk to them and find out why so you work out a way to avoid it happening again. Just letting the problem continue wastes time for the other members and will cause friction between members.

editthesadparts
12-19-2009, 10:35 PM
I found the rest of your post to be really good. It touched on several important issues. This part is basically good too. But I also disagree with it, to some degree.

Practicing (individually) or rehearsing (as a band) is important and necessary. But there can be too much of a good thing. If you're only focused on the frequency and amount of time invested, it's easy for practice/rehearsals to become stale and counter-productive.


Better to "right-size" the amount of time and use it in the most efficient manner.
Quality > quantity.

Yeah?

I agree actually, my band just really needs to practice right now and I guess it was on my mind. We have a show in a week and we've barely practiced this month at all!

I'd also like to add that you should always be very polite with booking agents and venue staff. Don't be sarcastic or condescending or anything that would make the guy not want to help you.
If your talking to an agent over email, be quick to reply and be very straight forward in your messages. If your on the phone (or email) Small-talk is okay sometimes, but he's there to help organize a show, not listen to you talk about your nephew's best friend who can blow a string of snot five inches out of his nose then suck it back up.

Play it safe when booking a venue, make sure to ask if they provide PA, lights, mics, and a soundboard or you'll regret assuming that they do when you end up scrambling around town, looking for a PA to rent the day of the show.

King Turi
12-20-2009, 09:04 AM
Well, I haven't been a bandleader for very long, only a few months, and we're kinda equals except I'm the oldest and for some reason I've just naturally been the leader kinda guy.

Anyway, what I've learnt is definately rehearse but also practice at home on your own as well if you have to, in the same key and everything, and also learn all the words to all the songs just in case the singer (which is actually me, mostly) forgets the lyrics.

As lead singer it is really helpful when my bandmate drops a line or something when I've forgotten the lyrics, it doesn't make me feel like he's showing me up or anything, it's very useful.
Admittedly I shouldn't forget lyrics, but hey, shit happens.

..and always bring your own stuff, like leads and stuff, even if the joint your playing at says they have everything - NEVER BELIEVE THEM!!!

._.

Vendetta V
12-20-2009, 05:20 PM
aahaa ^^ hell im the lead singer in most of the cases too.. but im the solo/lead guitarist at the same time so it's kinda hard to keep up all the stuff at once and if i dont practice at home i wouldn't be making it...



hmm what i may also say is
always say what you dont like in others performans 9i mean other members) say what you dont liek but state why and what is better in your opinion
be friendly... !!!! dont just shave the shit in their eyes..
say like if you dont like the drum part you dont go and say "you know your comleptely retarded. play it THIS WAY GODDAMIT!!!!" be like "you know i think this would suit here better in my opinion or..... idk decide by yourself" if they still dont like it either say to vote ... or just leave it that way. you cant change the person's feelings he's trying to put in...

hmm also be kinda friendly but like i said dont let anybody's ego grow huge...

hmm what i also like is to have a friend or a person in the band (who plays enough well btw) who is trusted by you so say if it's a 4 piece band, when you 'll suggest new thing he'll be on your side in most cases (if you're saying right thing) thus even if other two won't liek it you'll be still be able to vote it... not like 1 against 3 but 2:2.... so it'll be a good balance...


and learn a bit of theory and musical termins.. this way you ownt be like "well you play that chord which goes like 3 2 0 1 starting on the lowest 3rd string from the ground... and put the settings on that pedal giving up some dirt to your instrument to less dirt and forget those screaming noices you do all the time by touching your string with yoru thumb or whatever you do..."

:p

Lt. Shinysides
12-20-2009, 06:10 PM
DOUBLEEDIT:

A really useful thing to have is a facebook message thing going with all the band members in it. It means you can all leave messages to the whole band and it's on facebook which people see all the time. Honestly, it was so useful for my old band. You can also reference it for band times, setlists etc.

my band is using this. i can't even tell you how handy it is to be able to message everyone all at once.


my tip:
have at least one off the cuff jam session every time you go to practice. almost half of my band's best material has evolved from things we came up with during jams.

Clutch32192
12-20-2009, 10:45 PM
I agree actually, my band just really needs to practice right now and I guess it was on my mind. We have a show in a week and we've barely practiced this month at all!

I'd also like to add that you should always be very polite with booking agents and venue staff. Don't be sarcastic or condescending or anything that would make the guy not want to help you.
If your talking to an agent over email, be quick to reply and be very straight forward in your messages. If your on the phone (or email) Small-talk is okay sometimes, but he's there to help organize a show, not listen to you talk about your nephew's best friend who can blow a string of snot five inches out of his nose then suck it back up.

Play it safe when booking a venue, make sure to ask if they provide PA, lights, mics, and a soundboard or you'll regret assuming that they do when you end up scrambling around town, looking for a PA to rent the day of the show.
That is awesome!

Where you rehearse is important, a central location is best, but if at someones house make sure everyone agrees, cus having to drive alot farther than the other members can cause hardships.

Vendetta V
12-21-2009, 04:30 PM
hmmm yes agreed with both two...
jams are some good way to come up with good material to experiment with!!!

editthesadparts
12-22-2009, 03:40 AM
hmmm yes agreed with both two...
jams are some good way to come up with good material to experiment with!!!

Haha, the only song we had that came from a jam was thrown out weeks later. It may work for you, but not us. Not at all :P

QuantumMechanix
12-22-2009, 12:46 PM
Great thread! Ima stick it for me.

I'd say schedule practice times in advance and make sure anyone who cancels does so as soon as they find out they can't make it.

Dont go to a gig unless you all know EXACTLY what you're going to play and in what order and have all the songs down pat

If you don't get along with your bandmembers, you might as well forget it, no matter how good of musicians you are individually.

Make it clear that everyone needs to learn songs on their own time, not at band practice

I'll add more when I think of them

Vendetta V
12-22-2009, 04:42 PM
ahah thats just what I was going to say

hmm consider the fact that even if everyone of you can shred the shits out of any ear... and melt the strings by speed or blast beat the hell out!! that doesnt mean you WILL go along together well... people gotta have good tempo feel and also gotta suit with the styles they like... their philosophy and stuff


EDIT may be i gotta write an article about this.. and put it in my first post??!!

ncregan
12-22-2009, 07:30 PM
1. The band is not YOU. It's everyone else, including you.
2. Don't be manipulative.
3. Money is the great persuader, and the answer to many of your questions.
4. Play nice with people. The pimply n00b doing sound may one day be the head of Sony Entertainment.
5. What goes up must come down. That means that the people you screw over on your way up, WILL be waiting for you when you return to earth.
6. Great songs beats great technical prowess.
7. The younger your market, the more important image is.
8. If you want to make it, you can't do it part time.
9. If it sounds good, it IS good. Nobody really cares who makes it, and nobody really cares how you did it.
10. Your competition is NOT the other indie bands in your town. Your competition is Green Day, Celine Dion, Elton John, Nickelback, and Miley Cyrus. Because in the end, people don't have special budget lines for "local indie music." They have a willingness to spend their time and money on "music."

CT

Yeah all of the above. I would agree mostly with number 1. The band is not a thing that a single person owns. It is a group of people who all have ideas and vision's. Take into consideration other people's tastes and opinions.
Making sure everyone a) knows what they are doing at a band practice
and b) is on the same page. If they aren't it'll be disastrous.

I'll add more if i think of some more
Niall :peace:

Vendetta V
12-23-2009, 05:07 PM
yes hmm id also recommend to play with the persons with the same Experience.. playing with more advanced players can be useful but they wont stand it too long.. and playing with noobs is a problem too... you start understanding that what they do is what you want them to.. they are not doing with all heart and sometimes they say absurd things...

that's the same for genre.. try to have players with at least a bit of the same taste

scguitarking927
12-23-2009, 07:16 PM
^^^
+1

If your not on the same page musically, that goes for genre, skill level, etc. Forget it, its going to burst into flames eventually lol.

You need to have some kind of common musical interest to make things work

JackFlash19
12-24-2009, 01:07 AM
There's alot said I'll likely duplicate, but here's my input from 6+ yrs of bandleading.

1. ALWAYS be on time.
Or at least make a concerted effort to get there. Just because it's music and you don't clock-in/clock out doesn't mean your employers [the venues] don't take a mental note of it.

2. Have backup equipment wherever possible
Even if it's the ugliest guitar that you hate. don't want to look like rookies having to ask for guitars to borrow or having a bandmate not play because you weren't prepared enough.

3. The structure/riffs of the super-awesome song you just wrote is NOT set in stone, flow with it.
The influence of your other bandmates musically is usually what produces a unique sound other than that of 'just you'.

4. Have each band member put $5/$10 into a band fund jar every single practice.
Scrape the money together, pull it from your car, doesn't matter. If you're serious, this money will build quicker than you think. Combine it with the income you make from shows will make for a serious dent in whatever recording costs (or other large band-related investments: merch, stickers, pictures etc) may come up later on.

5. Always be humble
Regardless of how superior and awesome you think you are, coming off that way towards your bandmates and the people you come in contact with is not professional. If you are so spectacular at what you do, let the music do your talking for you.

6. Keep all your bandmates informed of practices/shows/cancellations.
Nothing like someone 'forgetting' and having the bassist clear his schedule for the night and there end up being no practice. We all have lives too, please be courteous as your bandmates have other obligations they may be giving up during 'practice time'.

7. Practice at HOME as well as at practice.
If the only time you turn on your amp or sit on your throne is at practice, you are cheating yourself and your band. Even if the band practices all the time, practice MORE. Always be trying to surpass someone who is better than you in skill level.

8. Learn the other side of it.
If you are musically oriented, read books on music business. If you are business oriented, read books on music theory. Having a good knowledge of both sides of the puzzle will help you when the time to contribute (or understand) comes along.

9. The music WILL NOT DO THE WORK for you.
No matter how much you think it will. As a band, pull together and do the necessary legwork to promote and market yourselves well. Shouldering a single bandmate with that responsibility is neither right or courteous. The music needs to be there to have something to promote, but if there are 5 bandmates doing the work of 1 person, your word will travel faster and further, essentially bringing more people and $$$ to your shows.

10. Learn songs that aren't in your primary listening genre.
If not to get outside creative influences, use it to expand your skill level. Metalhead? Try some speedy bluegrass. Into the chill/ambient? Learn something fast and crazy. The most creative mind is the one that challenges itself most often.

11. Load up and break down ASAP!
No other band likes to wait an eternity for you to relax while you chat w/your fans and unload your gear off-stage. Not only are you making them late, you're essentially cutting the entire night short with the time you are lolly-gagging around with. There is a closing time AND a schedule.

12. DON'T STEAL GEAR!!!!!!
^ See above.

13. Always plug for the bands after your set and thank the bands before you.
It's only courteous to help spread the word of the bands you're working with. Whether or not you like them or thought they were good, do it anyway. If it's a rival, you're now the bigger person. If it's a crappy band, they'll make a mental note of that and plug/promote/thank your band later

14. Don't break/trash things.
Seriously, do I need to say this?

15. Always let your band know your schedule.
Whether it's work, school, holidays, days you want to make sure not to have a show or practice. There are 4-5 other people arranging their schedules to meet up, don't spring something on your band last minute saying "oh I can't practice, I have blah blah going on tonight". This means know your gfs birthday and your anniversary. (You should know this anyway)

16. Always reach out to the people in the crowd and make them feel special.
Even if it's to thank them for coming or asking them to stick around for your set. Treat them like another number and they will likely do the same to you. "Oh it's just another band whoring themselves out". If you don't attempt to make it personal they'll likely just toss the flier you handed them into the trash on their way out.

17. Don't fight at band practice (or at a show for that matter).
Let's not waste everyone's time while we're here. Don't put your bandmates in a bad mood if you happen to be in one. If you've got beef with a band member, talk to them outside of practice and resolve the issue.

18. Don't stop playing at a show. KEEP GOING
Guitarist drops out, keep going. Singer goes hoarse, keep going. Nothing looks more amateur than stopping the song to wait for the whole band to get back in it. And NEVER EVER start a song over. Welcome to "Hey mom and dad, watch what I learned!".......

19. Don't cancel shows unless you absolutely have you.
Try being the booking agent for a club when 2 bands cancel the night of/night before a show and you have to scramble to find people to fill the slot. Death/illness are ok (obv). The band breaks up, let the club know asap. If you have to work, see point 20.

20. Ask off work BEFORE the show is booked.
Assuming you are off for that night simply because you're never scheduled is not a smart thing to do. Be sure. See how happy everyone else will be when you say "I have to work" when everyone else is loading in getting ready to go play. Be responsible.

21. Get a confirmation when you book the show from the club.
Just because they say 'we'll try to get you on that day' doesn't mean they actually do. Double-confirm the show the week before and make sure you show up on their calendar. Not only for confirmation purposes, but to also have your name out there when people visit the clubs site.

22. Always set your amp/pedal levels BEFORE you get to the show.
When the sound engineer checks your dirty at 4 and doesn't know your clean volume is set at 9, not only will he be pissed, everyone in the crowd won't think you've got your act together.

23. Record/videotape your performances and review them later w/the band
Even if you did a crappy job, and you know you did, get the recording from the club or from whoever is going the videotaping. When think you moved a ton and you see how much you ACTUALLY moved, you will be suprised. Therefore you can improve on what you do next show. Something may sound or look really cool and wasn't even meant to happen. You'll catch that on tape and easily recreate it later.

Vendetta V
12-25-2009, 05:03 PM
yes i see loads of people (including me) recommend videotaping your performance.. it really helps

Vendetta V
12-27-2009, 04:29 PM
bump??!!

AlanHB
12-27-2009, 06:14 PM
bump??!!

That's a double post and pointless bump mate. I won't give a formal warning this time, consider this one an informal one.

Vendetta V
12-28-2009, 04:51 PM
ah sorry man.. really that was pointless

hmm Here's a good idea

i always do like this
instead of hearing the new musician (when creating a new band) you can just invite him over to your place and play not at the loud volumes so you can hear all his mistakes... that way you dont call over everybody and have a big noise mess...
hmm also it save time... hmm

frnzd
12-28-2009, 08:17 PM
Never suddenly decide to play a song you haven't practised on stage. Sounds obvious yeh?

We did that. Some of the most horrible minutes of my life. I'd forgotten everything, and the bits i did remember I played in the wrong key.

Lt.DanHasLegs
12-29-2009, 03:39 AM
The other bands at shows are more important than the crowd.

I say this because band networking is how you get more shows at more venues. From my experience, most venues are willing to take bands regardless of their draw. cause until you're well established, they won't recognize your name well enough to know what kind of crowd you bring.

However, other bands, will be how you get shows and therefore have more opportunities to make fans and build a base. Making four new fans is much more valuable if they're in another band rather than out infront of the stage.

Vendetta V
12-29-2009, 07:15 AM
hmm i remember we once finished the set to early (didnt take a brake between the two sets played about hour and 10 mins at once...) and i said we gonna do a free style improvising..
it was really improvising.. we played a song we didint know at all.. well onyl a rif and we started improvising.. i then sang something.. (again improvising on air) and it turned out pretty well (lucky us :D) we even did he second improvising song.. crowd was pretty fulfilled

JackFlash19
12-29-2009, 09:22 PM
The other bands at shows are more important than the crowd.

I say this because band networking is how you get more shows at more venues. From my experience, most venues are willing to take bands regardless of their draw. cause until you're well established, they won't recognize your name well enough to know what kind of crowd you bring.

However, other bands, will be how you get shows and therefore have more opportunities to make fans and build a base. Making four new fans is much more valuable if they're in another band rather than out infront of the stage.


I'm going to STRONGLY disagree with this. The fans are the most important part. Granted, making the connections with other bands will help you get shows, but say they do get you into that great venue and you pull 7 people......Regardless of who recommends you it will be VERY unlikely you will get another show (unless of course the club just likes your music THAT much...don't rely on this). Not only that, the band that recommended you, who already has enough rep and pull to get you into that show, may come off to the venue as not having a trustworthy recommendation if you draw terribly. You do not want to make the person who took a chance on you look stupid.

Alot of making it places is about who you know, but do not put the fans above this. I would rather make a connection with one single fan at a show who loves my music over connections with 3 other bands that night. Because when you make that connection with a fan of yours (NOTE: a fan is someone who likes your music....), they will spread your word to their friends like wildfire. Another band will likely be busy trying to make things happen for themselves over putting a worthwhile focus on some random decent band they met at a show.....

Vendetta V
12-30-2009, 04:26 PM
Yeah completely agreed good sir

fans are the main organ in your music. if they stop listening to you your music ruins.
they are the Engine! Yes make everything to appeal a fan and next time you'll be having a gig they'll tell all their friends how awesome your gigs are. The Show/stage presence or may be The Music That great to listen live... may be for you being so nice with the fans.... free bear in addition or cd demos... think of any possible way to appeal your fans and they'll help you on the other side too!!!!