how to 'transpose'?


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hellbasser
12-24-2009, 01:43 PM
Okay so my friend who plays the tenor saxophone had a solo on a song we were playing in Jazz Band, and he gave me his music cuz I wanted to play that solo on my bass, but my teacher said I have to transpose it from treble clef to bass clef.. I have no idea how to do this.. if anyone could help, that'd be great!! thanks!

'93
12-24-2009, 01:49 PM
transpose mean basicall moving the notes in steps, but keeping the same intervals

intervals are the differences in pitch between to notes
eg.e to f is one semitone (one fret)
you transpose one semitone backwards
it becomes d# to e

now what your teacher means is moving each note an octave or two down so they wont be at the same pitch but at the itch of the bass guitar

P-Bass Pirate
12-24-2009, 01:54 PM
now what your teacher means is moving each note an octave or two down so they wont be at the same pitch but at the itch of the bass guitar
Not true. To transpose treble clef to bass clef, you transpose every note 4 half steps up. So a D becomes an F, C becomes E, etc. That will keep it in the same key as the tenor solo, but you'll be able to read it in bass clef. You'll probly also have to transpose again because a tenor sax is a B flat instrument and a bass is in concert pitch, but I'm not definite on that. Hopefully someone else will be able to clear that up for you.

lucas1wj
12-24-2009, 02:12 PM
this is lazy as heck but if you put the solo on guitar pro as guitar 6 string for tab notation and tenor sax for instrument you have his solo

then you click and make with 4 four string ie bass itll automatically transpose down to bass

Greenday389
12-24-2009, 02:50 PM
Write down(on paper or guitar pro or something) his solo in C from what is written(key of Bb). That means you take his notes and move them up a whole step or 2 half-steps. After that you switch it to bass clef. You do this by moving everything down a line or space.

You can switch doing the key or clef first or last.

jazz_rock_feel
12-24-2009, 03:25 PM
The thing with what you're doing is it requires reading in treble clef (not really a transposition) which means that you have to understand that different lines and spaces mean different notes on each clef. For instance, the first line in treble clef is an E and the first line in bass clef is a G. There's no real sure-fire way to "transpose" this besides knowing it. There's no up a third or something like that because it's really up a line or space. After you know that you have to understand that the tenor saxophone plays a C and it sounds like your Bb. So you have to take the note you read (in treble clef remember) and move it down a step. The last part is only important if you want to play it in the same key as him. If you don't then you can just play it as if it was up a whole step.

Revelation
12-24-2009, 03:28 PM
Write down(on paper or guitar pro or something) his solo in C from what is written(key of Bb). That means you take his notes and move them up a whole step or 2 half-steps. After that you switch it to bass clef. You do this by moving everything down a line or space.

You can switch doing the key or clef first or last.

I believe you'd move the notes down 1 whole step to get the same note...but otherwiose.

Glad somebody mentioned this. Tenor sax is in the key of Bb so the music is written 1 whole step higher than the note you actually hear. I can't remember why it's done like that, but it is.

I also suggest using guitar pro/powertab to do this. save you a LOT of time really. moving something down a space/line =/= a whole step all the time. remember taht there is no incidental(#/b) between B and C, and E and F. Put it into guitar pro as written but have the intstrument tuned one whole step above the tuning you will be playing in. Then change the tuning back to the tuning you are going to use when you have it all finished. when it asks you if you want to transpose the piece click 'No.'

jazz_rock_feel
12-24-2009, 03:31 PM
^From what I've learnt the reasoning for tuning to different pitches has a lot to do with keeping fingerings consistent through a family as well as making a lot of common fingerings simple.

Revelation
12-24-2009, 03:33 PM
ya. I had him do it this way so that he could just write the composition to match the notes on the staff, so it's easy to know he has it right. then switch back to correct tuning and it's transposed from Bb to C instantly.

hellbasser
12-24-2009, 05:16 PM
ummm I'm not really sure how to use guitar pro... any help?? for example if my friend's 1st 4 notes are G,C,F,E, and theyre straight up eigth notes, how do i put that in guitar pro, and then transpose to bass?

gwath42
12-24-2009, 10:19 PM
G,C,F,E

Because Tenor Sax is in the key of Bb, you need to take his notes and move all the notes down 1 whole step lower.

SOOOOO.
On the bass guitar, you could play F, Bb, Eb, D

Forget transposing to bass clef, it doesn't matter. If you know how to read treble clef, bass clef isn't important.
Just take the notes and move down 1 whole step.

hellbasser
12-25-2009, 11:46 AM
oh okay thats not hard. okay, thank you

John Swift
12-26-2009, 07:20 AM
^From what I've learnt the reasoning for tuning to different pitches has a lot to do with keeping fingerings consistent through a family as well as making a lot of common fingerings simple.It is so that arrangements can be written in our around the staff without dozens of leger lines.

skream
12-26-2009, 04:59 PM
The easiest way i can think of is to move the notes on the staff up two lines(a perfect 5th) add 2 flats, and read like bass clef. For example if you see their middle C (sounding Bb) and move it up two line lines it reads like a Bb (G in treble clef) and so on.
Its just like reading tenor clef

But im a bass trombone player so i had to learn this stuff.

I hope that helps