trouble with my group/music, please..


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pepsi1187
12-30-2009, 03:04 PM
I'm having some differences with my bandmates about our studio work. It's been stressing me out, like I really am ****ing troubled by this. I just want someone to hear me out and give me some real advice.

okay, well for the last couple months, we've been exploring options towards creating and releasing MP3s of our work. We went to a few studios, but I was never honestly satisfied with whatever we had finished.. so i took it upon myself to just make the damn CD.

Anyways, here's my problem. I am very attached to the music I composed. My music and the ideas I had were without a doubt, the foundation of this group when we first started six months ago. We play alternative hip-hop/live rock.. basically I spent alot of time composing music on the guitar and my first vocalist was a rapper.. but I tried to write some real good music for this project, taking nods to other genres and styles, not just a couple, but my point is.. I'm very proud of the music I created and because it came out of my head, It only makes sense that I should be the one producing the music.

I mentioned I took it upon myself to produce our cd. The label we work for has been pressuring us to come out with just something. Something with our names on it. I've managed to record 13 songs, 7 of them are finished. Now I admit, I'm not an engineer. I would prefer it if I wasn't. The quality of the tracks might be questionable, but their good enough for what my group needs them for. Now, I can admit shortcomings... however, I have confidence in my tracks because I've shown them to people and they freaking love it. I promote my work, I get results. I even managed to get my group a live radio appearance through one of my tracks.


But, here's the conflict. My band members don't like my work at all. They don't like the quality, they don't like the mixing job, they don't like the raw, live sound I'm going for; the sound that attracts our audience to begin with. They want everything polished with ****ing wax. Yesterday we got into it, because they absolutely refuse to have anything to do with what I've done. Idk.. all I had to say was to go make a cd yourselves. I tried to do something good for my group, and they don't seem to care. but my tracks must amount to something if I can manage to get goddamn radio play. I don't know what to do.


http://artists.ultimate-guitar.com/streetlight_sanctuary/

those are the 7 songs I finished..

Gh.
12-30-2009, 03:17 PM
Maybe I'm not a producer, just an usual music listener, but those tracks are in some places unlistenable. This amount of noises etc. are unbearable for me.
Not considering the sound, music itself is quite interesting. In my opinion you've done some great work as the composer.
If anyone ask me what's 'raw, live sound', I say go listen to Nirvana's In Utero. A sort of suggestion.

axemanchris
12-30-2009, 03:24 PM
I listened to bits and pieces of the first three. Although the sounds of each of the instruments and vocals sound perfectly fine, the parts themselves are really not working together. There are some serious enough timing issues that I actually had to pause the player to make sure I wasn't hearing another recording sounding through along with what I was trying to listen to.

As for the feel and the vibe.... I can see what you're after, and it will work, but the execution at the moment is really very, very lacking. By listening, I can't imagine that commercial radio would touch this, though it seems to be striving for that market. Campus radio.... they'll play anything once or twice. Just because you got play on campus radio doesn't assure any level of quality. Commercial radio is much more selective on what they will play. Even their indie shows demand a certain level of recording production and songwriting quality.

Can you post something that you had done elsewhere? That could be informative for us to see what it is you are objecting to.

For this genre, I have to agree with your band members. The production value - even if it wants to have a "street/hood/underground" affectation - has to be slick.

CT

Sandor138
12-30-2009, 03:28 PM
well is it just your band or are they a part of it too? Because the way you're making it sound it's your band and if they don't like what you are doing they can just shut the f*** up and deal with it.

xConverge
12-30-2009, 03:29 PM
I only listened to Hood Rock. But ill still give you some feedback.
I'm at universtity studying music, mostly doing recording, engineering etc, so hopefully i know what im talking about haha.

Firstly, its really well written, i'd be proud of that.
The only main problem is that the guitar mixed into the right channel is WAY too fuzzy, i'd really clean that up and let it less dominate the right, bring it into the left more now and then, gives things more room. Im not a 100% sure but i'd add more clean to your left channel guitar too, i think it'd add more dynamics to the sound.
Drumming might need to be brought more to the front at some times too, the intro was done great though.

Other than that its really good dude. Just dont go mad with the channels haha.

pepsi1187
12-30-2009, 03:36 PM
well is it just your band or are they a part of it too? Because the way you're making it sound it's your band and if they don't like what you are doing they can just shut the f*** up and deal with it.

not at all.. It's just hard compromising with them sometimes.. they have difficulties making practical decisions..

but like I said.. I'm just real attached to my music and I don't know how to deal with it. I don't know what to have faith in right now... I only trust what I know...

axemanchris
12-30-2009, 03:48 PM
The only main problem is that the guitar mixed into the right channel is WAY too fuzzy,

You're in a university recording program and you think the amount of fuzz on the right guitar is a bigger problem than the timing issues?

University recording program? I know colleges offer this, but what do you get out of a university program. Bachelor of Recording Arts or something? What school offers university degree programs in recording? :confused:

CT

isabiggles
12-30-2009, 03:48 PM
It's too messy, I wouldn't be happy with that either to be honest.

xConverge
12-30-2009, 03:54 PM
You're in a university recording program and you think the amount of fuzz on the right guitar is a bigger problem than the timing issues?

University recording program? I know colleges offer this, but what do you get out of a university program. Bachelor of Recording Arts or something? What school offers university degree programs in recording? :confused:

CT

Its a music course. Recordings one of the modules ;)

axemanchris
12-30-2009, 03:57 PM
Makes more sense....

CT

pepsi1187
12-30-2009, 03:58 PM
I listened to bits and pieces of the first three. Although the sounds of each of the instruments and vocals sound perfectly fine, the parts themselves are really not working together. There are some serious enough timing issues that I actually had to pause the player to make sure I wasn't hearing another recording sounding through along with what I was trying to listen to.

As for the feel and the vibe.... I can see what you're after, and it will work, but the execution at the moment is really very, very lacking. By listening, I can't imagine that commercial radio would touch this, though it seems to be striving for that market. Campus radio.... they'll play anything once or twice. Just because you got play on campus radio doesn't assure any level of quality. Commercial radio is much more selective on what they will play. Even their indie shows demand a certain level of recording production and songwriting quality.

Can you post something that you had done elsewhere? That could be informative for us to see what it is you are objecting to.

For this genre, I have to agree with your band members. The production value - even if it wants to have a "street/hood/underground" affectation - has to be slick.

CT

I guess, I just needed to hear that from someone..

I just don't wanna feel like a ****in sell out. But shit, if people are telling me to clean it up then I guess I should. I definitely don't want to put out stuff that people wont like.. I wouldn't waste my time If i thought that was the case, but I guess nobody's asking me to change the music itself...

but what do you think I should do, though. I mean. I don't wanna spend months wandering around in the dark. I even admitted I'm no engineer..I'm up to redoing all this shit.. if it means people will like it, but Idk what I should do.

Do you think maybe I should bring an engineer over here to work with?

koslack
12-30-2009, 04:37 PM
If I were your label, I would not put out anything unless you worked with a professional producer. I can think of very, very few labels that trust even established acts with tons of studio time under their belts to self-produce. The audio quality on the recordings is not at a level I would accept, even for an indie label. You have timing issues, plus I hear popping and lots of distortion.
That's just my opinion. Get yourself a good producer, and you have something. As it is, this is not something you can release.

isabiggles
12-30-2009, 04:48 PM
I guess, I just needed to hear that from someone..

I just don't wanna feel like a ****in sell out. But shit, if people are telling me to clean it up then I guess I should. I definitely don't want to put out stuff that people wont like.. I wouldn't waste my time If i thought that was the case, but I guess nobody's asking me to change the music itself...

but what do you think I should do, though. I mean. I don't wanna spend months wandering around in the dark. I even admitted I'm no engineer..I'm up to redoing all this shit.. if it means people will like it, but Idk what I should do.

Do you think maybe I should bring an engineer over here to work with?

Lol you think you're a sellout for having a clean, tight recording? Recording quality has nothing to do with selling out. The point is that your recording is sloppy and generally poor. If you want to sacrifice a good recording for the sake of supposedly not being a sellout then be my guest but it's a bad idea.

EDIT:

And those that do have generally all established themselves previously as good producers e.g. Forefather.

axemanchris
12-30-2009, 04:52 PM
Get someone who knows what they're doing. Definitely. It's either that, or learn yourself, but I'll tell ya... learning the new instrument called the "studio" is like learning any other new instrument. Even after two years, you're still a n00b.

Also, whoever you get should be a fan of the genre. That is critical. They will know those things that are idiomatic to that genre and will know how to make them work and will know how to execute them.

Perhaps your label can suggest someone?

CT

Dio10101
12-30-2009, 09:02 PM
The music is alright, but Im not really digging the guitar tone, and the rapping seems out of place on the tracks, and they sound too gritty. I say ask your label if they have a house producer(pr the studio) and see what they can do with it.

The Arsis
12-30-2009, 09:17 PM
I wouldn't pay for the CD TBH. It sounds way too amature'ish and sounds like you recorded everything with a computer mic.


TS, you didn't do a good job and I recommend you get a recording tech to help you out.

AwesomeDrummer
12-30-2009, 10:51 PM
Get someone who knows what they're doing. Definitely. It's either that, or learn yourself, but I'll tell ya... learning the new instrument called the "studio" is like learning any other new instrument. Even after two years, you're still a n00b.

Also, whoever you get should be a fan of the genre. That is critical. They will know those things that are idiomatic to that genre and will know how to make them work and will know how to execute them.

Perhaps your label can suggest someone?

CT

Definitely go with this. It's integral for you guys to work with someone who will appreciate what your making, and be able to offer actual advice, as well as put up a mix that could relate to your music.