volume at band practice.


PDA

View Full Version : volume at band practice.


tom708
01-21-2010, 08:31 PM
hey,

ive just joined a band and had my first practice with them on Wednesday, the session was very productive and I learnt most of the songs we practised pretty quickly.

but ive got a rather embarrassing problem, i had to take my 100 watt randall half stack because my other amp a marshall JCM2000 DSL 401 is getting a service.

the problem is the other guitarist in the band has a marshall MG50 and was drowning me out with it, i could hear myself fine over the drums and the bass but not when we played the songs as a full band.

has anyone got a tips to make me be able to at least hear myself?

thanx :)

BlitzkriegAir
01-21-2010, 08:36 PM
you shouldnt be playing full blast at practice
its bad for your hearing and everyone should be able to hear each other

everyone should be at the same level of the drums

Nose Spray
01-21-2010, 08:38 PM
I got the same problems sometimes :P better earplugs can help or you can simply turn up the volume a little + maybe stand closer to your amp :P

Black Star
01-21-2010, 08:39 PM
Tell your other guitarist to turn himself down. Simple as that.

Also, the other problem might be with the "crushing overdrive" of the MG. I'd recommend setting it on fire and telling your other guitarist to get a better amp.

tom708
01-21-2010, 08:39 PM
we weren't at full volume

Zoso Juan
01-21-2010, 08:41 PM
Tell your other guitarist to turn himself down. Simple as that.

Also, the other problem might be with the "crushing overdrive" of the MG. I'd recommend setting it on fire and telling your other guitarist to get a better amp.

This

tom708
01-21-2010, 08:43 PM
Tell your other guitarist to turn himself down. Simple as that.

Also, the other problem might be with the "crushing overdrive" of the MG. I'd recommend setting it on fire and telling your other guitarist to get a better amp.

haha never thought of that

GODhimself37
01-21-2010, 08:45 PM
Yeah it's pretty obvious to tell him to turn it down...

And to set fire to his MG.

its_alive
01-21-2010, 11:14 PM
Always make sure to sync up volumes before you start playing. Use discretion when turning yourself up/down during.

Zycho
01-21-2010, 11:33 PM
Do volume checks. Adding mids also helps you cut through the mix.

The4thHorsemen
01-22-2010, 12:26 AM
our former rhythm guitarist apparently had trouble hearing himself even when he was drowning everyone else out. at the start of practice we'd do a sound check, his knob would end up at 4... then throughout practice it would slowly work it's way up to 7. halfway through practice I'd end up messing with my EQ between songs, wondering why I wasn't cutting through, and then realize he was jut really loud then tell him to turn down... but by then the drummer had worked himself up to hitting harder to hear himself, and it was couple of songs after that before he was down to a normal volume.


anyways, tell him to turn down.

SomeoneYouKnew
01-22-2010, 02:34 AM
has anyone got a tips to make me be able to at least hear myself?Amp stand. Great stuff. Puts your amp at ear level. Wanna hear yourself more without crowding the mix? Just move closer to the amp.

kees beest
01-22-2010, 03:40 AM
I guess this is a common problem in most rock bands. As said before, just do a soundcheck and prohibit people to change the amp's volume without asking.
But changing the relative positions of the amps can do wonders too.
One thing I noticed is that uing too much gain has the same effect as you just mentioned. The other guitarist in my band turns his gain on his Big Muff almost to the max, so I tend to use at little distortion as possible to hear myself, even though we play stoner rock.

Phil Starr
01-22-2010, 04:27 AM
you shouldnt be playing full blast at practice
its bad for your hearing and everyone should be able to hear each other

everyone should be at the same level of the drums

Spot on though I would add that the drummer should keep things in check too.

There is a real problem hearing yourself in the mix in any sort of amplified band. You'll find it even worse when you play live especially in small venues. As soon as sound levels go over 90dB they start to damage your hearing and the muscles that control the bones in your middle ear start to tighten to restrict the sound being transferred to your inner ear. This reduces the amount of information getting through and is the cause of the often noticed effect that the "louder it gets the less you hear".

After years of mixing I can tell you that psychology is important too. Some people like to hear what they are doing much more than they want to hear what the rest of the band are up to whilst others are self conscious and try to hide in the mix. Neither is very professional. Like everything else you learn to pick yourself out of the mix by practice and experience.

If you are in balance then the only way you have of changing what you hear is to move nearer the amp you want to hear and to move the speakers so they point at your ears. Your mate has to turn right down, you will develop more slowly as a band if he doesn't.

6stringbassist
01-22-2010, 12:54 PM
Do a sound Check!
It solves everything. We all make sure that everything is syncing up nicely and that everyone can hear themselves and everyone else. It's that simple.