Famous self-taught guitarists


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aquamarine_55
08-01-2010, 12:34 AM
Who are some famous self-taught guitarists?

So far I have-

Eric Clapton
Eddie Van Halen
Prince
BB King
Jimmy Page (mostly)
Jimi Hendrix (?)

Any others?

slash4114
08-01-2010, 12:37 AM
Too many to even begin to count...

Stevie Ray Vaughan.

FMCmakesmesmart
08-01-2010, 12:41 AM
Rusty Cooley and Yngwie Malmsteen. Way too many to even list honestly lol. Those are the fastest guys though that are self taught, that I know of.

guitaristren
08-01-2010, 12:41 AM
Chuck Schuldiner
Dave Mustaine

connorhxcchaos
08-01-2010, 12:50 AM
Steve Vai is sorta self taught.

onanobis47
08-01-2010, 12:51 AM
Steve Vai



oh wait....

pwrmax
08-01-2010, 12:56 AM
Not really a guitarist but...

http://www.lindsayjoyhamilton.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/les-claypool.jpg

Joshua1207
08-01-2010, 02:29 AM
I think Isaac Brock taught himself.

bingeandletgo
08-01-2010, 02:42 AM
Rusty Cooley and Yngwie Malmsteen. Way too many to even list honestly lol. Those are the fastest guys though that are self taught, that I know of.

Wow, I had no clue those guys were self-taught.





Carlos Santana
John Frusciante

Not the most technically proficient, but awesome nonetheless

Fiddly Diddly69
08-01-2010, 02:48 AM
The rhythm guitarist for Avenged Sevenfold is
Dave Mustaine from Megadeth
I think Kerry King is too

grungebaby
08-01-2010, 04:11 AM
kurt cobain and i think dave grohl, i know he was a self taught drummer

The.new.guy
08-01-2010, 04:21 AM
Isn't Herman Ri self- taught?

Fender Dane.
08-01-2010, 04:22 AM
A little related info, which I am fairly sure is true. I heard somewhere that Slash and Dave Grohl can't read music also, which I found a little funny because I also read many places that music reading is something every professional recording artist simply need to know.

The.new.guy
08-01-2010, 04:29 AM
Rusty Cooley and Yngwie Malmsteen. Way too many to even list honestly lol. Those are the fastest guys though that are self taught, that I know of.
You're ****ing shittin' me...Really?????!!!????? O_O

grungebaby
08-01-2010, 04:35 AM
just on a side note, is being able to read tab the same as music?

Forkman
08-01-2010, 05:05 AM
just on a side note, is being able to read tab the same as music?
No - you have to be able to read from a music staff.



And a lot of popular musicians have no idea how to read sheet music.

fixationdarknes
08-01-2010, 05:08 AM
Just as a side note, people these days use the term "self-taught" way too loosely. I've never had a guitar instructor in person come give me lessons, but I don't consider myself self-taught because of all the internet/book resources I've come across. Oh, and Freepower :p:

grungebaby
08-01-2010, 05:15 AM
alright back on topic, isn't jeff beck self taught?

aerosmith513
08-01-2010, 08:17 AM
Jack White I think.
Rich Robinson
Me
Duane Allman

skywalker45
08-01-2010, 02:34 PM
Les Paul was self taught I believe not to mention what he did for the world of guitar playing in general.

On a side note most professional musicians cannot sight read music and could give a **** less about a musical staff. Once you know all the scales, notes, theory and modes you don't need to read music. Plus pattern instruments like guitar negate the need for sheet music unless you just want to do it. Most would tell you it's a waste of time though. Practicing is better than any sheet music reading.

Nilpferdkoenig
08-01-2010, 02:51 PM
Slash
Zakk Wylde

both afaik

Sickz
08-01-2010, 03:09 PM
Be amazed. Marty Friedman is self taught.

shanethestoner
08-01-2010, 03:19 PM
Be amazed. Marty Friedman is self taught.

YES :cool:

Tigerfang
08-01-2010, 06:07 PM
How has nobody mentioned Guthrie Govan yet? The man's a monster.

hairmetal90
08-01-2010, 07:39 PM
George Lynch

slayerfrk
08-01-2010, 08:22 PM
bulb from periphery

cherryredsg
08-01-2010, 09:36 PM
Angus Young
Malcolm Young

Actually, I think they used magazines or something. :\

One2three
08-01-2010, 09:46 PM
Angus Young
Malcolm Young

Actually, I think they used magazines or something. :\
.......
That IS self taught.
The only way, not to be self taught is to have a teacher.
Otherwise anything you read and pratice on your own is the act of self teaching.

fixationdarknes
08-01-2010, 09:50 PM
Be amazed. Marty Friedman is self taught.

That explains a few things lol.

Legend Jedicsc
08-01-2010, 11:05 PM
Ben Burnley from Breaking Benjamin taught himself.

I think James Hetfield did... I can't remember.

Lots O' FX
08-01-2010, 11:34 PM
Frank Zappa is self taught IIRC

COBShredder
08-02-2010, 12:08 AM
Marty Friedman

brandon2784
08-02-2010, 12:58 AM
How has nobody mentioned Guthrie Govan yet? The man's a monster.

Right you are, it almost, ALMOST, scares me when I watch/listen to him.

STONESHAKER
08-02-2010, 02:13 AM
Steve Vai isn't self taught, he took lessons from Satch for a time.

Also - you don't need to sight read if you're interested in playing your own music.

However, if you have any interest in being a session player, you can bet your ass the first thing they're going to do when they interview you is ask you to play some sheet music.

Hab Fan
08-02-2010, 03:05 AM
SRV couldn't read music.

Metalfan41
08-02-2010, 04:06 AM
James Hetfield
Kirk Hammett
Jason Becker
Chuck Schuldiner
Muhammed Sucimez
Eddie Van Halen

Sickz
08-02-2010, 06:03 AM
James Hetfield
Kirk Hammett
Jason Becker
Chuck Schuldiner
Muhammed Sucimez
Eddie Van Halen

Are you kidding me? Kirk was taught by Satch!

GilbertsPinky
08-02-2010, 06:14 AM
Just as a side note, people these days use the term "self-taught" way too loosely. I've never had a guitar instructor in person come give me lessons, but I don't consider myself self-taught because of all the internet/book resources I've come across. Oh, and Freepower :p:
Oh, you have some brown thing on the end of your nose.. :rolleyes:

Mikael Akerfeldt and Steven Wilson are both selft-taught.

RetroCaesar
08-02-2010, 05:42 PM
I'm pretty sure David Gilmour is self taught....I may be wrong..

The_Toki
08-02-2010, 07:00 PM
James Hetfield
Kirk Hammett
Jason Becker
Chuck Schuldiner
Muhammed Sucimez
Eddie Van Halen

Becker had a teacher.

fixationdarknes
08-02-2010, 07:03 PM
Oh, you have some brown thing on the end of your nose.. :rolleyes:


Yar, I know :p: And Freepower knows too, I think he's cool with it :haha:

Metalfan41
08-02-2010, 09:53 PM
Are you kidding me? Kirk was taught by Satch!
He took lessons from him after he joined Metallica, he taught himself for 5 or 6 years

Becker had a teacher.
I though he surpassed his teacher after a few months and stopped?

Tigerfang
08-02-2010, 09:58 PM
Right you are, it almost, ALMOST, scares me when I watch/listen to him.

Haha I honestly can't believe some of the things he plays. That tapping lick in WST is pretty much impossible to duplicate.

Zaphod_Beeblebr
08-02-2010, 10:20 PM
Right you are, it almost, ALMOST, scares me when I watch/listen to him.

Haha I honestly can't believe some of the things he plays. That tapping lick in WST is pretty much impossible to duplicate.

You both need to watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PyOZhgQnvU

Brandon because if Guthrie's playing doesn't already terrify you this will and Tiger because the WST tapping lick really isn't the most technical thing he's capable of :p:

Kyleisthename
08-03-2010, 01:35 AM
Rusty Cooley and Yngwie Malmsteen. Way too many to even list honestly lol. Those are the fastest guys though that are self taught, that I know of.
I think rusty took lessons from tom hess or something a long time ago

brandon2784
08-03-2010, 04:27 AM
You both need to watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PyOZhgQnvU

Brandon because if Guthrie's playing doesn't already terrify you this will and Tiger because the WST tapping lick really isn't the most technical thing he's capable of :p:


OMG that double scares me as i saw that for the first time just minutes before reading your post... WEIRD?!?!? Also one of the most difficult things I have seen done, just wow.

brandon2784
08-03-2010, 04:28 AM
I think rusty took lessons from tom hess or something a long time ago

Nah I don't think so, Although plenty of people seem to think he did so maybe.

slayerfrk
08-03-2010, 10:10 AM
rusty took theory lessons

Junior#1
08-03-2010, 11:12 AM
He took lessons from him after he joined Metallica, he taught himself for 5 or 6 years

That's still not self taught. He was for a time, but by that logic you could argue that anyone who currently is practicing but isn't in a teaching session at this very moment is teaching them self.

kian89
08-03-2010, 04:53 PM
i dont know really .. but I'm pretty sure about Hendrix

BlueFuzion101
08-03-2010, 09:55 PM
Marty Friedman was sort of a teacher for Jason Becker..

Greg Howe is self taught.

STONESHAKER
08-03-2010, 10:06 PM
I don't know whether Eddie Van Halen took lessons or not, but he took a couple things Ritchie Blackmore introduced to the music world and ran with them (i.e. tapping)

lilwill322
08-03-2010, 10:17 PM
mark tremonti, from creed and alter bridge.

MicahChaney
08-03-2010, 10:21 PM
How has nobody mentioned Guthrie Govan yet? The man's a monster.

+1

midgetrocker36
08-04-2010, 05:56 PM
jack white was self taught i kno, evh locked himself in his basement for a week to learn guitar so he was, of course hendrix was, srv was, theres a lot more too

Tigerfang
08-04-2010, 06:49 PM
You both need to watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PyOZhgQnvU

Brandon because if Guthrie's playing doesn't already terrify you this will and Tiger because the WST tapping lick really isn't the most technical thing he's capable of :p:

Oh yeah I've actually seen that one before, although I had forgotten about it. You're quite right though, that's one of the most impressive performances I've ever seen.

Fender Dane.
08-05-2010, 07:26 AM
You both need to watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PyOZhgQnvU

Brandon because if Guthrie's playing doesn't already terrify you this will and Tiger because the WST tapping lick really isn't the most technical thing he's capable of :p:

That guitar looks so shiny and it's quite clever too. I guess the strings won't wear down the fingerboard, when it's made out of metal.

rwtd
08-05-2010, 08:37 PM
Its nice to hear that ... really it made me feel better lol

Halen is a tapping mob lawl
oh and Yngwie ?? ;o i thought he took like million lessons tho he got the 'potato fingers' :O

Zep_shizzle
08-05-2010, 09:26 PM
Chet Atkins. Period.

Steve08
08-05-2010, 10:19 PM
Nah I don't think so, Although plenty of people seem to think he did so maybe.According to Rusty himself he took Hess' music business class.

ask768
08-06-2010, 09:07 AM
is guthrie govan self taught? i think i remember reading one of his books and in the section about having perfect pitch, i swear i remember him saying his teacher used to play something on a cassette (dont remember what) and it used to annoy his teacher as the player was a bit slow and so the pitch of everything was lowered somewhat...

anyway, afaik tom morello is self taught. he practiced 8 hours a day whilst studying at harvard

stef123
08-06-2010, 04:14 PM
I don't know whether Eddie Van Halen took lessons or not, but he took a couple things Ritchie Blackmore introduced to the music world and ran with them (i.e. tapping)

Blackmore taps? :O

Funk Monk
08-06-2010, 04:40 PM
Wow, I had no clue those guys were self-taught.





Carlos Santana
John Frusciante

Not the most technically proficient, but awesome nonetheless


John Frusciante took lessons. A teacher was the one who taught him how to tune his guitar in a way so he could Barre some Germs Songs. A teacher also introduced him to Hendrix and other guitarists.


Was Les Paul self taught?

skywalker45
08-06-2010, 05:02 PM
John Frusciante took lessons. A teacher was the one who taught him how to tune his guitar in a way so he could Barre some Germs Songs. A teacher also introduced him to Hendrix and other guitarists.


Was Les Paul self taught?

To my knowledge Les Paul was self taught. Just to interject about Guthrie Govan I kind of heard the same thing the other poster heard but I believe it was a guy he just used to pick around with and not an instructor?? Not sure though. I had heard for a long time he was self taught.

amplifiedparts
08-06-2010, 05:07 PM
Jimmy Page was mostly self taught, though he took a handful of lessons when he was very young.

bjovi400
08-06-2010, 05:12 PM
Jimmy Page was mostly self taught, though he took a handful of lessons when he was very young.
well, if he took a handful of lessons when he was very young,... then i'm pretty sure that means he was taught....

SirMajorMusic
08-06-2010, 05:18 PM
Steve Vai is sorta self taught.

Yeah, except for the fact that he took lessons from Joe Satriani

amplifiedparts
08-06-2010, 05:20 PM
well, if he took a handful of lessons when he was very young,... then i'm pretty sure that means he was taught....

I don't think if you take a few lessons when you're 12 that means you're not self-taught. If he truly weren't self taught he would have to have taken lessons for several years to get to the level he achieved.

This is what he said in an interview:

When I grew up there weren't many other guitarists ... There was one other guitarist in my school who actually showed me the first chords that I learned, and I went on from there. So I taught myself the guitar from listening to records. So obviously it was a very personal thing.

SirMajorMusic
08-06-2010, 05:21 PM
SRV couldn't read music.


Guitar players don't really need to read music though. I'm sure they're plenty of guitar players who don't know how to read music, they sure do know how to write it though.

skywalker45
08-06-2010, 07:31 PM
Guitar players don't really need to read music though. I'm sure they're plenty of guitar players who don't know how to read music, they sure do know how to write it though.

+1

Kwote
08-06-2010, 07:58 PM
According to Rusty himself he took Hess' music business class.

That's what I gathered

http://tomhess.net/Students/RustyCooley.aspx

Zaphod_Beeblebr
08-06-2010, 09:15 PM
is guthrie govan self taught? i think i remember reading one of his books and in the section about having perfect pitch, i swear i remember him saying his teacher used to play something on a cassette (dont remember what) and it used to annoy his teacher as the player was a bit slow and so the pitch of everything was lowered somewhat...

anyway, afaik tom morello is self taught. he practiced 8 hours a day whilst studying at harvard

Guthrie is indeed self-taught and he doesn't have perfect pitch, he said so himself in the Licklibrary webcast (still on their site for anyone who wants to watch).

mmnohmygod
08-06-2010, 11:18 PM
Tommy Emmanuel, Rory Gallagher

skywalker45
08-06-2010, 11:18 PM
Guthrie is indeed self-taught and he doesn't have perfect pitch, he said so himself in the Licklibrary webcast (still on their site for anyone who wants to watch).

Yup! That's it you're right! Great post! I remember the webcast and was trying to think of where I heard Guthrie talk about his guitar playing. I had it confused with something else I guess. In my book Guthrie is pretty much the man really! Thanks for clearing that up for all of us who couldn't remember.

STONESHAKER
08-07-2010, 12:15 AM
Blackmore taps? :O

Well, for some reason my dad tried telling me Blackmore was tapping and Deep Purple is one of his favorite bands, but I don't think he does. If you listen to the lead in Highway Star, you'll hear ascending sequences of 3 notes played moderately fast. It is my opinion that since the notes are pretty close together and his attack is pretty sharp, he's probably just picking the notes, or maybe using a combination of picking and legato.

It's that idea of playing melodies up a single string that Eddie ran with.

Deep*Kick
08-07-2010, 01:40 PM
Tommy Emmanuel, Rory Gallagher
Was going to mention Emmanual, godlike.
Steve Vai isn't self taught, he took lessons from Satch for a time.

Also - you don't need to sight read if you're interested in playing your own music.

However, if you have any interest in being a session player, you can bet your ass the first thing they're going to do when they interview you is ask you to play some sheet music.
You do if you want session players to cover some parts

STONESHAKER
08-07-2010, 07:22 PM
Correction: you don't need to sight read if you want session players to cover some parts; that's what the session players are for.

I'd like to clarify that transcribing and sight reading are two different skills and that every guitarist should be transcribing things by ear for listening practice.

Gelato
08-08-2010, 12:25 AM
I don't get the interest in this topic? You can do well playing an instrument without a teacher, but you having a teacher gives you a definite advantage in the learning process. It just seems like you all want some reasssurance that you can do well without lessons? Well you can.

Also, on the sight reading issue: Sight reading is difficult on a guitar because of the various positions to play each note. You can't try to justify your laziness by saying "you don't need it", or, "no professional guitar players can read music well". You've just got to work hard.

In America
08-08-2010, 06:19 AM
The Edge

STONESHAKER
08-08-2010, 01:25 PM
Oh yeah... I read Clapton's autobiography, he taught himself at a young age by copying records.

skywalker45
08-08-2010, 09:03 PM
Okay just one last post about Guthrie Govan then I'm done I promise.

Zaphod_Beeblebr posted that he was indeed self taught and indeed as I knew he was right and he does not, contrary to TONS of articles on the internet have perfect pitch. He has relative pitch but then that's something all of us need to have and it's totally doable with aural training which is very important, not just to guitar, but to any instrument in general. But don't take it from me and Zaphod_Beeblebr. Just watch it all for yourself and Guthrie will dispel all your doubts if you have any. No formal training whatsoever except 5 chords his dad taught him when he was young if you count that as having been taught. Enjoy!

http://www.licklibrary.com/lessons/1080/guthrie-govan/guthrie-govan-interview

In America
08-09-2010, 12:43 AM
Ed 'O Brien

aaron@tmc
08-09-2010, 01:56 AM
Pretty interesting, I was suprised to hear some players like Yngwie were self taught. It takes quite a lot of determination and effort to teach yourself so maybe that's why so many successful guitarists were self taught? Hmm.

Morbius77
08-15-2010, 07:21 AM
Muddy Waters
Keith Richards
Jerry Garcia
Albert Collins
Brian May
T-Bone Walker
Tony Iommi

All self taught.

Tominator_1991
08-15-2010, 08:10 AM
Les Paul was self taught I believe not to mention what he did for the world of guitar playing in general.

On a side note most professional musicians cannot sight read music and could give a **** less about a musical staff. Once you know all the scales, notes, theory and modes you don't need to read music. Plus pattern instruments like guitar negate the need for sheet music unless you just want to do it. Most would tell you it's a waste of time though. Practicing is better than any sheet music reading.


what


you know the guitar is STILL a musical instrument and reading music, to REALLY be above the rest nowadays is essential

Angus fan95
08-15-2010, 12:18 PM
Who are some famous self-taught guitarists?

So far I have-

Eric Clapton
Eddie Van Halen
Prince
BB King
Jimmy Page (mostly)
Jimi Hendrix (?)

Any others?

Jimi Hendrix did receive lessons and also had lessons from ZZ Tops Billy Gibbons to learn how to play slide and Jimmy Page... well pretty much taught by the people in his "village" when he was a child(watch his documentary "It Might Get Loud'')

and Jack White and the greatest finger picker in the world Tommy Emmanuel are both self taught

Deaddog
08-15-2010, 01:47 PM
and Jack White and the greatest finger picker in the world Tommy Emmanuel are both self taughtYou gotta funny way of spelling Chet Atkins

mmolteratx
08-16-2010, 01:43 AM
Jimmy Page was mostly self taught, though he took a handful of lessons when he was very young.

He took a few lessons from John McLaughlin while he was a session player too. At least according to the Hammer of the Gods biography.

MightyAri
08-16-2010, 06:13 AM
what


you know the guitar is STILL a musical instrument and reading music, to REALLY be above the rest nowadays is essential

I don't see how..unless you're going to be a teacher or studio muso?

cringer
08-16-2010, 10:58 AM
Anybody mention Wes Montgomery?
one of the most influential jazz guitarists of all time.

Rebi83
08-16-2010, 11:30 AM
Anybody mention Wes Montgomery?
one of the most influential jazz guitarists of all time.

He picked with his thumb because he couldn't play loud at home. Later this became his signature techique.

Tominator_1991
08-16-2010, 08:23 PM
I don't see how..unless you're going to be a teacher or studio muso?


But if you ever hope to play with other people, other band member what do you tell them? oh im playing this fret here - the uhh ... ... ... 7th fret on the low string - so play that note on the keyboard *plays note repeatedly til keyboardist finds note*

Explaining what you are doing and how to do it becomes a tad difficult

The_Toki
08-16-2010, 08:45 PM
Well, for some reason my dad tried telling me Blackmore was tapping and Deep Purple is one of his favorite bands, but I don't think he does. If you listen to the lead in Highway Star, you'll hear ascending sequences of 3 notes played moderately fast. It is my opinion that since the notes are pretty close together and his attack is pretty sharp, he's probably just picking the notes, or maybe using a combination of picking and legato.

It's that idea of playing melodies up a single string that Eddie ran with.

Blackmore doesn't tap at all. You're either thinking of the arpeggios during Jon Lord's organ solo or the four-note sequence in Blackmore's solo (well, 3 note really, but he picks the last note twice) which is quite clearly picked, and quite staccato. Ritchie was quite anti-tapping, he NEVER did it.

skywalker45
08-17-2010, 12:48 PM
what


you know the guitar is STILL a musical instrument and reading music, to REALLY be above the rest nowadays is essential

Really?? Sorry but I have to disagree and of course I know that guitar is an instrument. But to really be above the rest it is essential?? No it's not it. Guthrie Govan doesn't read sheet music. Is he above the rest or below? He said there's nothing wrong with learning to read sheet music but it isn't necessary. It depends wholly on the situation. If you're going to be a session player then yes you'd better know how to read sheet music. For the better part of us it isn't necessary with guitar. Eric Clapton ---- not a sheet music reader, is he also below the rest? Dave Gilmour ---- Not a sheet music reader, is he also a step below the rest?

Point is that "most" but not all great guitarist DO NOT read sheet music. They may know how to but they don't use it in their playing because they already know enough about the instrument and rhythm to negate the need for any classical notation. Learn it if you want but it is anything but essential. Many threads on UG regarding this. You should read up.

But if you ever hope to play with other people, other band member what do you tell them? oh im playing this fret here - the uhh ... ... ... 7th fret on the low string - so play that note on the keyboard *plays note repeatedly til keyboardist finds note*

Explaining what you are doing and how to do it becomes a tad difficult

Who do you play with?? Man this just never happens, not in my experience anyway. Do you honestly think a guitarist says, "uhh... I'm playing this fret right here?" No, it doesn't happen that way. It's based all on chord progressions, the key the music is written in, and improvisation. More than likely it goes like this:

"We're playing a progression in C ---- I, IV, V, etc." Now the scale being used is known and everyone knows exactly what to do. The only time sheet music is really necessary is when you're trying to convey musical ideas, in a technical way, to other musicians. It has it's place, I'm not denying that, but it really isn't necessary not even in the way you've described. A former instructor once told me (and he was an amazing guitarist and banjo player) that if he could sight read he could make a lot of money as a session player but it stopped right there. Otherwise it just never happened.

Hidden Hippo
08-17-2010, 01:53 PM
Zacky Vengence (A7X) is self-taught I believe.

Zaphod_Beeblebr
08-17-2010, 05:39 PM
Guthrie Govan doesn't read sheet music.

Actually he can, just not hugely well, not well enough to play a piece on sight reading but he can and he can also write sheet music very well. The real issue with sheet music, he says, is that he prefers to know the parts of any given piece and 'just wing it'.

mmolteratx
08-17-2010, 07:52 PM
Point is that "most" but not all great guitarist DO NOT read sheet music. They may know how to but they don't use it in their playing because they already know enough about the instrument and rhythm to negate the need for any classical notation. Learn it if you want but it is anything but essential. Many threads on UG regarding this. You should read up.

wat

The vast majority of great jazz guitarists read sheet music and every great classical guitarist reads sheet music. It's an extremely useful skill and there's no reason not to learn it as it's fairly simple. If you want to study music in a formal setting, it's required.

OT: Oz Noy is self taught IIRC. But he reads sheet music and can play circles around 99.9% of guitarists.

Tominator_1991
08-18-2010, 12:44 AM
wat

The vast majority of great jazz guitarists read sheet music and every great classical guitarist reads sheet music. It's an extremely useful skill and there's no reason not to learn it as it's fairly simple. If you want to study music in a formal setting, it's required.

OT: Oz Noy is self taught IIRC. But he reads sheet music and can play circles around 99.9% of guitarists.


Agreed

The people who avoid it are just cutting themselves short in the long run, Its a necessary skill nowadays

evhbrianmay
08-18-2010, 12:50 AM
isn't satch?

skywalker45
08-18-2010, 11:35 AM
Well the idea of this thread was to name as many self taught and famous guitarists as possible. Unfortunately it swerved a little off the path when, yet again, reading sheet music was brought into the mix. Allow me to explain myself one more time. My original response was directed only toward Tominator_1991 and the idea that reading sheet music is necessary nowadays. I'm not trying to dissuade anyone from learning a new skill or building on what they already know but my question remains how has music changed recently nowadays? Staff notation has been around for hundreds of years and is really the only way to convey musical ideas to other musicians. It was never created to convey musical ideas to a listening audience. In a similar way Isaac Newton invented calculus to explain physics to the scientific community. I would push this one step further to say ---- Then why isn't everyone reading staff notation? If it has changed nowadays wouldn't it stand to reason that it's been like that forever?

There are a LOT of beginning guitarists on this forum. Some are trudging through just as I, and many others have, without the benefit of feeling like we need to learn staff notation. If your goal is to write music then yes it is an essential skill but even then not all composers (who compose only for guitar) use it. If you're going to be a session player then yes you need to know it. If you're writing music that you want to share with other musicians then yes you need to know it. But if you're like most of us who are enthusiasts and just want to play songs we like and push toward mastering our instrument then no it is not essential because if it were then everyone would have been classically trained.

You don't want to scare away beginners with the idea that they have to know where each note on their instrument falls on the musical staff. Many of them chose guitar because of its flexibility and one of those flexible joints is the ability to play and master the instrument without the need of classical aids. The same cannot be said of nearly every other instrument. That was the whole point of this argument. If you want to learn staff notation then I say, just as Guthrie Govan said, go for it. It can't hurt you. If you don't want to learn it you don't have to, and you're not short changing yourself if you don't. Tons of guitarists cannot and do not sight read music therefore it is not essential. But what was true then is true now. Music has not changed. Western music has always been the same with musical ideas floating around everywhere. Nowadays is a very misleading term.

Zaphod_Beeblebr
08-18-2010, 02:59 PM
isn't satch?

No, Satch had a few teachers in his time.

Recon _/
08-18-2010, 05:36 PM
mark tremonti, from creed and alter bridge.

he was taught by michael angelo batio.

I believe I can call MAB self-taught,he had a teacher for first 2 years only and developed the most important things himself.

Tominator_1991
08-18-2010, 07:05 PM
Well the idea of this thread was to name as many self taught and famous guitarists as possible. Unfortunately it swerved a little off the path when, yet again, reading sheet music was brought into the mix. Allow me to explain myself one more time. My original response was directed only toward Tominator_1991 and the idea that reading sheet music is necessary nowadays. I'm not trying to dissuade anyone from learning a new skill or building on what they already know but my question remains how has music changed recently nowadays? Staff notation has been around for hundreds of years and is really the only way to convey musical ideas to other musicians. It was never created to convey musical ideas to a listening audience. In a similar way Isaac Newton invented calculus to explain physics to the scientific community. I would push this one step further to say ---- Then why isn't everyone reading staff notation? If it has changed nowadays wouldn't it stand to reason that it's been like that forever?

There are a LOT of beginning guitarists on this forum. Some are trudging through just as I, and many others have, without the benefit of feeling like we need to learn staff notation. If your goal is to write music then yes it is an essential skill but even then not all composers (who compose only for guitar) use it. If you're going to be a session player then yes you need to know it. If you're writing music that you want to share with other musicians then yes you need to know it. But if you're like most of us who are enthusiasts and just want to play songs we like and push toward mastering our instrument then no it is not essential because if it were then everyone would have been classically trained.

You don't want to scare away beginners with the idea that they have to know where each note on their instrument falls on the musical staff. Many of them chose guitar because of its flexibility and one of those flexible joints is the ability to play and master the instrument without the need of classical aids. The same cannot be said of nearly every other instrument. That was the whole point of this argument. If you want to learn staff notation then I say, just as Guthrie Govan said, go for it. It can't hurt you. If you don't want to learn it you don't have to, and you're not short changing yourself if you don't. Tons of guitarists cannot and do not sight read music therefore it is not essential. But what was true then is true now. Music has not changed. Western music has always been the same with musical ideas floating around everywhere. Nowadays is a very misleading term.


I totally agree with that,

However its the flexibility that has lost the common guitar player his credibility lately, and to stand out from the Guitar Hero- tab reading - metallica fanboy crowd, reading from a staff would ultimately make you benefit, for instance, transposing notated pieces (jazz, classical, folk etc. etc.) and arranging them for guitar drums bass.

Its a neverending argument, but the concept scared me initially, and I wouldnt want any young and upcoming deterred from their instrument merely on the theoretical side of music - I lost a guitar student ages ago over it (he was a douche anyway)

skywalker45
08-19-2010, 03:31 PM
reading from a staff would ultimately make you benefit, for instance, transposing notated pieces (jazz, classical, folk etc. etc.) and arranging them for guitar drums bass.

Its a neverending argument, but the concept scared me initially, and I wouldnt want any young and upcoming deterred from their instrument merely on the theoretical side of music - I lost a guitar student ages ago over it (he was a douche anyway)

Well I can't disagree with your statement here. In this sense it is necessary and if you incorporate sight reading into your lessons for your students you are among the few but I do admire you for it. Too bad you lost a student over it though. That sux!! Anyway, didn't mean to argue the point too much. Just glad we could find some common ground. That generally always happens with musicians :)

Captain_GNU
08-19-2010, 03:40 PM
Alex Lifeson