Mixo-blues scale?


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TMVATDI
08-07-2010, 10:43 PM
I hear about this everywhere, I guess a cross between the misolydian and blues scale, but I don't know anything about it. Can anybody give me some info? And what are the intervals?

I've searched around the internet and really haven't found much about it, help is much appreciated, I'm mostly just curious.

blue_strat
08-07-2010, 10:50 PM
Mixolydian (1 2 3 4 5 6 b7)

Blues (1 b3 4 b5 5 b7)


In a major blues, the b3 or 3 can be played over the I chord and the b3 can be played over the IV chord (as it would be the b7 of that chord). The b5 is used stylistically, of course.

I don't know whether a "Mixo-blues" scale is supposed to use all of the notes of the two scales combined, or just add a b5 to the Mixolydian (this would be different to a Mixolydian b5 scale, which would be 1 2 3 4 b5 6 b7).

7grant2
08-07-2010, 10:50 PM
I don't exactly think you can cross those... are you sure you aren't just hearing someone soling in a Blues progression with Mixolydian?

EDIT: Ignore this post and read the one above me :haha:

st.stephen
08-07-2010, 10:53 PM
I think some people call this the bebop scale (although there's purportedly several different bebop scales), the numbers in relation to the major scale would be 1 2 3 4 b5 5 6 b7. Don't quote me on this though.

EDIT: it's a mode of one of the bebop scales according to wikipedia but I don't trust it anyway.

TMVATDI
08-07-2010, 10:56 PM
i just hear people talking about it a lot, my ears are nowhere near good enough to where i can hear a solo and guess what scale they're using haha. i know each of these scales um...fairly well i would say, like i know how they're made and how to create melodies/solos from them, and what progressions to use them over, i'm just not sure what the "mixo-blues" scale would mean, i guess blue_strat would be right about mixolydian adding a blues note or all the notes of the 2 scales

edit: and i've messed around with the bebop scale, or some bebop scale, dont know much abt it but i wouldnt think its the same thing

AlanHB
08-07-2010, 11:21 PM
Well obviously as a major blues is a major progression, you can use the major scale.

You can also use the blues/minor penatonic scales, as are most used in blues.

If you use both scales together, you can get a mixy sound, because you're using the major scale, and there's the flattened 7th from the blues.

TMVATDI
08-07-2010, 11:28 PM
Well obviously as a major blues is a major progression, you can use the major scale.

You can also use the blues/minor penatonic scales, as are most used in blues.

If you use both scales together, you can get a mixy sound, because you're using the major scale, and there's the flattened 7th from the blues.
i understand all that, but do you know if that's the actual mixo-blues scale i keep hearing about on the internet? thats all im asking, im surprised i hear abt it so often but nobody here can just say "i know that scale, here it is." but thanks anyway

AlanHB
08-07-2010, 11:35 PM
i understand all that, but do you know if that's the actual mixo-blues scale i keep hearing about on the internet? thats all im asking, im surprised i hear abt it so often but nobody here can just say "i know that scale, here it is." but thanks anyway

Well you don't have to consider it as a different scale, just a combination of the major and the blues.

If you really want to know what it would look like as one combined scale I'll write it here in the key of C;

C D D# E F F# G A A# B

TMVATDI
08-07-2010, 11:54 PM
Well you don't have to consider it as a different scale, just a combination of the major and the blues.

If you really want to know what it would look like as one combined scale I'll write it here in the key of C;

C D D# E F F# G A A# B
Oh i'm sorry i thought you were just giving me some info on the major scale and blues scale, I didn't realize that was the right scale. And I think I get it, thanks!

blue_strat
08-07-2010, 11:55 PM
C D D# E F F# G A A# B
Technically, they'd be called Eb, Gb and Bb in order to show their functions as b3, b5 and b7.

AlanHB
08-07-2010, 11:57 PM
Technically, they'd be called Eb, Gb and Bb in order to show their functions as b3, b5 and b7.

Good point ;)

MikeDodge
08-09-2010, 01:14 PM
Actually you achieve the scale by mixing the Major Pentatonic and the Blues scale from the same Root.

By think of it this simple it breaks it down into two sounds you use together to create tension and resolution against a dom7 chord, those two sounds are nothing more than Major and Minor.

If you look at G Major Pent you have - G A B D E
If you look at G Blues you have - G Bb C Db D F

If you mix them together you have - G A Bb B C Db D E F

That's only two notes away from a chromatic scale!

But, you don't use this scale linearly, you instead learn where the Major sounding lines are and where the Minor sounding lines are.

I have a full blow 50+ example tutorial using this one concept. It shows you ow it;s athe basis for quite a bit of music and can be applied to a ton of styles. I even show you some of the ways Jimmy Page, Alvin Lee, Albert Lee, Glenn Miller, SRV, Steven Morse, John Mclaughin, and more use it.

Each lesson has audio, tab, diagrams, explanation, etc as needed. And, it is COMPETELY free (not even any ads!).

Make sure you READ THE INTRODUCTION as it will show you how it comes together, other places/players you've heard using it, and how to give yourself a lifelong arsenal to work from to keep creating new stuff beyond what I show you...

You'll learn by mixing those two basic scales you get ALL of these complete scales:

Major Pent
Minor Pent
Blues
Mixolydian
Lydian Dominant
Dominant Pent

As well as usable fragments of:

Diminished
Whole Tone
Phrygian Dominant

Before looking at the examples, READ the Introduction, make sure you read it.

http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/AdvPent/AvdPentTOC.htm

Again, make sure you READ the Introduction.