Album Artwork?


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HillcrestBand
12-21-2010, 09:58 AM
My band is currently working on our first album and eventually we're obviously going to have to create the album artwork.

From the more experienced musicians out there, do you have any tips/suggestions for getting this done? We don't know any artists/graphic designers. How would/did you go about this? Is it all about who you know? Or is there always a way to go about this? Is there anyone out there online who specializes in this kind of thing that can be hired to do the job?

Thanks!

nouse4aname125
12-21-2010, 10:02 AM
we hired a friend of ours to do it for us. she's still a student so she mostly did it for the portfolio experience. maybe you can find someone that would do it for that? we offered her money but she said she didnt care. of course you might not be so lucky :P

jfreyvogel
12-21-2010, 10:10 AM
You could probably find someone just asking around here.

I would offer perhaps - I am a graphic designer - but I am very bad with deadlines, and what with the holidays I don't know when I would have time to begin with.

Martindecorum
12-21-2010, 10:12 AM
Trek it to a uni, as said above they are always out for projects seeing that there starting out as well its about creating a reference portfolio for themselves

kyle62
12-21-2010, 09:56 PM
There's plenty of good designers here (though not in the 'band logo' threads from what I've seen there lately). I used to do quite a bit of graphic deisgn professionally and did the odd freebie/cut-price job for people on UG.


I'd be happy to put a cover together for you!

The deal is, I'll do a simple, professional cover design to your specifications for free, yours to use however you want.
However, if you wanted revisions, or or professional-level 'optionals' like a sleeve, liner notes etc, or the original source artwork to edit yourself, I'd do them at a low price.

BlackDog55
12-21-2010, 11:00 PM
My band is currently working on our first album and eventually we're obviously going to have to create the album artwork.

From the more experienced musicians out there, do you have any tips/suggestions for getting this done? We don't know any artists/graphic designers. How would/did you go about this? Is it all about who you know? Or is there always a way to go about this? Is there anyone out there online who specializes in this kind of thing that can be hired to do the job?

Thanks!

Hell, I'll do it for you. Just give me your name, album title, and what you are looking for and I'll get crackin.

axemanchris
12-23-2010, 12:11 AM
I got a student of mine to do ours. She was an aspiring graphic artist. We paid her, and she used the work in her portfolio that she was just starting.

She came up with the concept, and between her and I, we hammered out something we both really liked. (see my avatar!)

But here is where the *real* learning took place for me.

Once we got it scanned and manipulated in the computer, overlaying the logo onto the background, etc., it was time to look at the criteria for the disc manufacturer.

There are two main colour formats - RGB (red, green, blue) and CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, blacK.) A lot of places, our manufacturers included, wanted CMYK and would not take RGB files.

Converting RGB to CMYK can really effect your colours. Our orange that we had in RGB turned a diarrhea brown when converted to CMYK. After fussing and futzing about for a good number of hours, we took the CMYK version to a printing shop and got them to run off a copy. It was fine. We even tried different software. I had been working with Corel PhotoPaint.

Colour accuracy varies from monitor to monitor. Just like your audio sounds different on studio speakers, your friends car, and your mom's ghetto blaster, your graphics will look different on different monitors.

I downloaded a trial of Adobe CS11 or whatever it was, and it still looked pukey. Lesson: work in CMYK from the beginning, and don't be afraid to print off a tester before you go to press.

Black is not black. There are many ways to achieve black, and they don't all look the same.

CT

Northernmight
12-29-2010, 07:21 AM
Ive been lucky to have two girlfriends who were visual artists in a row, otherwise either find a mate of yours that is good at drawing and/or designing or hire someone online.

One of my friends was talking about getting a cover made by the same fella who does Cannibal Corpse covers. Appearently he is not that expensive.

Just take a look around a site like myspace, there are loads of visual artists making artwork and logos for band logos, covers ect.

Punk_Ninja
12-29-2010, 12:58 PM
As many have said, if you know someone who's getting into graphic design/have a friend who does graphic design professionally you're pretty much on your way!
If you're a friend you're most likely able to give them a bit of cash, let 'em use it in their portfolio and you're golden.

Also, no offence to the guys who have offered on UG, but I'd avoid doing it like that.
These guys are more than likely perfectly good for the job. But when you're doing it online you won't be as involved in the process and there is much more chance for thigns to get lost in translation.
Where if you're able to meet with the person doing it you can propse the general idea, see their initial sketches or whatever and talk over what needs to be changed/what's good on it, etc.

I'm quite lucky in this aspect, I have a friend who was initially going down the graphic design route but changed careers mid-way through, so he'd be willing to do some work for cheap, and my bassist's girlfriend is an amazing artist, so I'd be sorted for one.

It's all about who you know for a nice deal. Though you can just hire someone, it's good to know people. But if you want to find the best deal, any uni or something which does a graphic design or arts course would be good as students will be willing to do most anything for cash and they'll be needing stuf ffor their portfolio.
Only hire a professional graphic designer (whom of which you aren't an acquaintence) if you have a large budget/are on a big enough label etc etc...

Dalek300
05-22-2011, 07:46 PM
Hey there, I'm not sure if you're still looking for a graphic artist but I'd certainly be interested in helping out where I can. I have a facebook featuring some of my work here: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Chris-Lucas-Graphic-Designs/145931195478496?ref=ts

I'm open to working with lots of different styles so if you think I can help in anyway, definitely post me a message on my page or email me at iamlucasc@hotmail.com seeing how I'm not really on the forums that often. Really hope that I can help you out! Cheers!

Tobyflyr
05-28-2011, 07:02 PM
I got a student of mine to do ours. She was an aspiring graphic artist. We paid her, and she used the work in her portfolio that she was just starting.

She came up with the concept, and between her and I, we hammered out something we both really liked. (see my avatar!)

But here is where the *real* learning took place for me.

Once we got it scanned and manipulated in the computer, overlaying the logo onto the background, etc., it was time to look at the criteria for the disc manufacturer.

There are two main colour formats - RGB (red, green, blue) and CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, blacK.) A lot of places, our manufacturers included, wanted CMYK and would not take RGB files.

Converting RGB to CMYK can really effect your colours. Our orange that we had in RGB turned a diarrhea brown when converted to CMYK. After fussing and futzing about for a good number of hours, we took the CMYK version to a printing shop and got them to run off a copy. It was fine. We even tried different software. I had been working with Corel PhotoPaint.

Colour accuracy varies from monitor to monitor. Just like your audio sounds different on studio speakers, your friends car, and your mom's ghetto blaster, your graphics will look different on different monitors.

I downloaded a trial of Adobe CS11 or whatever it was, and it still looked pukey. Lesson: work in CMYK from the beginning, and don't be afraid to print off a tester before you go to press.

Black is not black. There are many ways to achieve black, and they don't all look the same.

CT

Any proper graphic designer will know this though.. And will know how to set the image up properly for printing...

Basically, RGB is only for screen use, CMYK is for printing.. And even within RGB and CMYK there are different profiles you can use, depending on which format you need it to be printed which kind of paper to use, all that sort of stuff..

Also remember that 72 dpi, is useless for printing.. Most printers will get the best results with 300 dpi, although large scale printers often do better with lower dpi, between 150-200..

The thing is, if you plan on having it printed professionally, always ask the people who's gonna print it for the right settings, and then get someone who knows what he's doing, to set it up.. It makes a HUGE difference...

___________

Edit: Holy f*ck this is an old topic...

axemanchris
05-28-2011, 10:50 PM
All of this sounds right to me. The only thing was that our graphic artist was not into computers, so getting it into the computer was my domain. She did the original artwork, believe it or not, with pencil crayon on basic white copy paper.

CT