So my band is playing at a battle of the bands...


PDA

View Full Version : So my band is playing at a battle of the bands...


schecter ftw
02-14-2011, 07:38 PM
Hey guys, my band recently entered into a battle of the bands, were we have to play a 6 songs setlist. My band members want to do a set that mostly contains our own songs, then like 1 or 2 covers. But wouldn't it be a better idea to do like 2 of our own songs, then the rest covers, as the audience is going to between the age of 13 to 17, and probably doesn't care about our own music, and just wants to hear something they know?

NickAgueci
02-14-2011, 07:45 PM
I don't think so. While most people might like to hear something familiar, the idea is to get your name out there. I'd play as many originals as possible.

AlanHB
02-14-2011, 08:03 PM
Most battle of the bands don't allow you to play covers at all. The idea is to have the best band playing their songs, not the best replication of other people's songs.

If you must play covers I'd play one tops.

krypticguitar87
02-14-2011, 11:28 PM
I have two responses

1) if this is a high school battle of the bands then just do covers, you aren't really going to be playing to people that want to hear original stuff. I went to the battle of the bands that my school had offered all four years I was there and none of the bands that played original stuff were even recognized, the kids only wanted to hear the bands that played covers.

2) if this isn't then you shouldn't even play covers. you only have six songs to show off who you are and playing a cover of someone elses music dosent show that you have any idea of what you are doing... if you want to start a fallowing then you don't want to play covers.

schecter ftw
02-15-2011, 10:43 PM
I have two responses

1) if this is a high school battle of the bands then just do covers, you aren't really going to be playing to people that want to hear original stuff. I went to the battle of the bands that my school had offered all four years I was there and none of the bands that played original stuff were even recognized, the kids only wanted to hear the bands that played covers.

2) if this isn't then you shouldn't even play covers. you only have six songs to show off who you are and playing a cover of someone elses music dosent show that you have any idea of what you are doing... if you want to start a fallowing then you don't want to play covers.

It's not at a high school, but its at some "Teen Club" place. Meaning that its going to be mostly High Schoolers.

'93
02-16-2011, 10:12 AM
i say one maybe two covers...should be enough to show your influences. but mostly your songs

krypticguitar87
02-16-2011, 06:30 PM
It's not at a high school, but its at some "Teen Club" place. Meaning that its going to be mostly High Schoolers.

then don't do mostly covers it should be mostly if not all original stuff...

Riffman15
02-18-2011, 06:12 AM
I'd say average out the two possibilities. 50% covers 50% original. If you're gonna sway in either direction, sway on the side of originals.

Mezo
02-18-2011, 06:18 AM
If you just wanna win battle of the bands, do like 4 covers and 2 originals. Covers have a higher probability of getting the crowd (of highschoolers) going.

SlackerBabbath
02-18-2011, 07:18 AM
I'd say average out the two possibilities. 50% covers 50% original. If you're gonna sway in either direction, sway on the side of originals.

I'd suggest this, but try alternating them, eg. original, cover, original, cover, ect.

That way, whether a person in the crowd is into covers or originals, they never have to wait very long before they hear something they like which stops them getting bored with your set. It's up to you whether you want to end on a cover or an original, but whichever it is make sure it's a good paced catchy tune. If you can get the audience singing along to the chorus the prize is as good as yours....


... just so long as the competition isn't fixed, which battle of the bands type of competitions often are.

Riffman15
02-18-2011, 09:20 PM
Honestly, on the notion that winners are "fixed," I'd say this is fairly accurate. Usually around where I'm from, the audience somehow votes at the end by either an anonymous ballot, or by seeing what band gets the loudest applause at the end.

Thus, these things are usually popularity contests. Whoever brings the most people and makes the most money for the venue wins and is invited back.

If there are judges deciding the winner, talent may play a greater role, although in my experience judges rank based on how "marketable" the band appears to be. Although this also varies based on number of other factors, such as the age and professional affiliation of the judges. Are they volunteers from your highschool's student government body? Are they industry reps from small labels in the area? The local soccar moms? Find out such information and base your decisions accordingly.

If you are able to draw a large crowd, larger than any other bands, you may have a shot. Otherwise, you're best bet would be to try and "win over" the crowd, in which case covers are probably your best bet. If you can mix these with originals that display extraordinary talent you might be able to sway the loyalties of some audience members.

If it is ranked by judges, you might try to use more original material, just make sure it is catchy and marketable. If judges are in charge, you would probably want about 30 percent covers, rest original, as judges typically have more respect for originals, as they typically rate based on how close X band comes to potentially being the next big thing.

SlackerBabbath
02-19-2011, 03:42 AM
Honestly, on the notion that winners are "fixed," I'd say this is fairly accurate. Usually around where I'm from, the audience somehow votes at the end by either an anonymous ballot, or by seeing what band gets the loudest applause at the end.

Thus, these things are usually popularity contests. Whoever brings the most people and makes the most money for the venue wins and is invited back.

If there are judges deciding the winner, talent may play a greater role, although in my experience judges rank based on how "marketable" the band appears to be. Although this also varies based on number of other factors, such as the age and professional affiliation of the judges. Are they volunteers from your highschool's student government body? Are they industry reps from small labels in the area? The local soccar moms? Find out such information and base your decisions accordingly.

If you are able to draw a large crowd, larger than any other bands, you may have a shot. Otherwise, you're best bet would be to try and "win over" the crowd, in which case covers are probably your best bet. If you can mix these with originals that display extraordinary talent you might be able to sway the loyalties of some audience members.

If it is ranked by judges, you might try to use more original material, just make sure it is catchy and marketable. If judges are in charge, you would probably want about 30 percent covers, rest original, as judges typically have more respect for originals, as they typically rate based on how close X band comes to potentially being the next big thing.

This. ^ :golfclap:

The problem with the higher end of 'battle of the bands' competitions is that they often tend to be 'arranged' to promote a band.
It's an old trick. An agency, publicist, management company or record label have just signed up a young band. They need publicity, so a battle of the bands is arranged and fixed so that the band in question will win. The 'prize' in these cases is usualy something like getting signed up to the agency, publicist, management company or record label, (who provide the judges) which of course they already are, and also free recording time in a professional studio, which is actualy paid for out of the door profits from the battle of the bands.

Suddenly there's a recording released by this new band who are being promoted as the winners of 'Ace Records Search for a Star' competition with all the ensuing press releases... and nobody is out of pocket because the battle of the bands event paid for it all.

Of course, that doesn't mean you can't gain your own publicity from such a competition, you may not be able to win it, but you could certainly increase your fan base from it.

Riffman15
02-19-2011, 03:55 AM
This. ^ :golfclap:

The problem with the higher end of 'battle of the bands' competitions is that they often tend to be 'arranged' to promote a band.
It's an old trick. An agency, publicist, management company or record label have just signed up a young band. They need publicity, so a battle of the bands is arranged and fixed so that the band in question will win. The 'prize' in these cases is usualy something like getting signed up to the agency, publicist, management company or record label, (who provide the judges) which of course they already are, and also free recording time in a professional studio, which is actualy paid for out of the door profits from the battle of the bands.

Suddenly there's a recording released by this new band who are being promoted as the winners of 'Ace Records Search for a Star' competition with all the ensuing press releases... and nobody is out of pocket because the battle of the bands event paid for it all.

Of course, that doesn't mean you can't gain your own publicity from such a competition, you may not be able to win it, but you could certainly increase your fan base from it.

Sounds like unnecessary fraud to me. Don't know where you are living but I doubt any real deal label would need to pull such a stunt to get an artist moving.

SlackerBabbath
02-19-2011, 05:02 AM
Sounds like unnecessary fraud to me. Don't know where you are living but I doubt any real deal label would need to pull such a stunt to get an artist moving.

I'm mainly talking about very small independant labels and management companies here. Companies that don't have the finance to properly promote a band. By 'higher end' I mean the kind of battle of the band that's arranged in a decent sized theater rather than in the local school hall, because it needs a fairly large place with lots of bands on the bill (each selling tickets to their friends) for the scam to be financially rewarding.
I'm in my mid 40s, live in the UK, and I've come across similar instances a few times, I've even heard of the scam being arranged and carried out by a band themself who had made up a fictional record company as a front for the scam and even hired a couple of actors to play the judges. (I kid you not)
Infact, in my youth, a band I was in was involved in just such a scam.

We had signed up to a small independant label/management company based in Blackpool, UK, back in the 80s and they arranged a similar scam.
We, being young and inexperienced, thought we were on the verge of hitting the big time when we signed up, because they came across as quite a large label, then we found out that the 'company' was infact just two guys working from one of their houses and that they were infact both bouncers on the door of a Blackpool nightclub.
Of course, we were disappointed, but as far as we knew (because we were nieve) we'd already signed the contract and these guys now called the shots and if we didn't play along, we'd be in breach of contract and have to pay a huge fine, and besides...they were big scary guys. (man... if only I knew then what I know now) So we went along with the scam, which is how I first learned about it.

In later years, after gaining a LOT more experience as a working musician, when at parties or hanging out in pubs with other musicians, when the beer was flowing and tongues were loosening, I'd occasionaly recount the story, only to hear similar stories from some of the other guys. I was frankly amazed at how common different versions of the same basic scam were.

But you're right, it is uneccessary fraud. The kind of guys who could successfully pull this kind of scam off are generaly also the same kind of guys who could successfully promote a band legitimately, and probably do it very well, if they so choose to, it's just unfortunate that they think they'll get further by trying to take short cuts and ripping people off, because in the long run, they probably put just as much effort into it as they would into a legitimate venture.

AlanHB
02-19-2011, 08:03 AM
Wow great story slacker!