Getting CD's pressed


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BreakingBnj
02-16-2011, 03:50 AM
So I'm releasing my debut album in April, and am looking for a good company to get my CD pressed with, does anyone have any experience with this? I want to get just a cd sleeve, and only make about 50 copies of my cd initially, and work from there.

I have been looking at diskmakers, but their reviews are so-so... Anyone have any suggestions?

Punkrokkboi
02-16-2011, 04:16 AM
Hmmm maybe CDbaby? Or reverbnation, they have cool merch options. My band DIYs our EP. We buy a spindle of blank CDs, burn them. Then we get those disc labels and print those and stick em on the CDs. Then we buy the sleeves. It's pretty cheap, and looks pretty good. Alot of the local bands up here do that.

CrossBack7
02-16-2011, 04:39 AM
CDBaby. It is the only way.

Seriously, it's like $2.50 a pop with cardboard sleeve that they'll print your cover on and everything. Do it.

BrianApocalypse
02-16-2011, 07:27 AM
I don't know of any notable US places, but over here at least the consensus seems to be that duplication companies recommend you to order 500-1k, and some actually aren't willing to do any less.

scguitarking927
02-17-2011, 12:47 AM
Do them yourself. You can purchase the proper printing paper online or go talk to the people at your local kinko/fedex store. Just get your design and print and stick. Then have your whole band burning cd's you can get a few hundred done in no time at all.

Then you have to think about what sort of casing you want to put it in? Options are very abundant here, plastic case, plastic sleeve, cardboard covering.

axemanchris
02-17-2011, 07:13 PM
If you're selling the CDs, then you've got to make it worth buying. It needs to look, sound, and feel like a "real" CD. In other words... DIY usually comes off as pretty lame, unless you're trying to appeal to the indie rock aesthetic, in which case, the rules are the opposite.

But generally, if you're going to drop, say, $10 on a CD, you want it to look, sound and feel like the other CD's you paid $10 for, right?

If you're giving them away, once you're done checking your head, it doesn't really matter. It's free. People will take them, use them as coasters, or as shims for stuff, and then lose them or recycle them before it gets any more than about two listens, so you're best saving your money, burning them off and writing on them with a Sharpie.

I suppose the most relevant question in today's market is "do you really need physical products?" If/when our original band releases our next batch of songs, I don't see us going that route this time.

The trick is somehow getting people to commit to buying a download at your shows and what-not, and I'm not really sure yet how to pull that off.

CT

ginger5138
02-18-2011, 03:26 AM
The trick is somehow getting people to commit to buying a download at your shows and what-not, and I'm not really sure yet how to pull that off.

CT

What my friend did was he put his download on his website, then had passwords on slips of paper and sold them at his show. You would buy the password for like $5, and then go home, get on the computer, and enter in your purchased password onto the website and BOOM! Your download has begun!

Highwaytohell
02-18-2011, 11:03 AM
(rises from dead)

Bandcamp is a godsend. You can have people directly buy from the website and simultaneously get their email upon purchase. Make sure that you hand out some kind of physical reminder at shows to give people the cue to visit your site so they can get the goods and keep supporting your music!