No Idea About Guitars


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Adam98150
02-22-2011, 03:07 PM
At all! But I've always wanted to play, since last year at least - I've started getting into songs as of late, and I'd love to have some form of talent that I've worked for. I think a guitar would be a welcome addition to my hobbies.

So, I'm 19, studying at college - I plan to move out and find a better job pretty soon. Thus, I will have plenty of disposable income. I may even get the guitar before I move out, since I already have a job - pretty poor pay though.

Anyhow, I was looking at the Ibanez GRG170DX or some form of Fender since I like all kinds of music - electric would be my preferred choice, but if anyone has any acoustic suggestions, please let me know!

Now the Ibanez is strictly Rock / Heavy so I've been told, luckily I enjoy bands such as Bullet so that would fit the bill pretty nicely. But I also enjoy the occasional Indie band. (Muse, Strokes, Beatles, Hoosiers, Kasabian and so forth)

Now, this is a big hurdle, I have no idea about all the terms and things you guys use on here. You know "Fret board" and all that sort of stuff. The material used for the guitar . . which brands are considered "good" and which are considered "poor".

I'm in dire need of help, and sorry if this is the wrong place, but I couldn't see a more fitting place for my thread.

Cheers guys, keep . . erm . . guitaring? :)

kaosxrocker
02-22-2011, 03:15 PM
I started out with a Yamaha beginner pack, then upgraded to an Epiphone G-400 and an older Epiphone Les Paul. I recommend a Les Paul style guitar, because they're typically pretty versatile. I see Agile recommended a lot on here, especially for beginners, so check them out as well. Keep in mind, no guitar is strictly anything. Some are just more suited for a particular genre than others.

EDIT: Also, you learn the terms as you go. We all started out exactly where you are.

TextOnTheScreen
02-22-2011, 03:28 PM
My biased, fanboy-ish suggestion for gear to start with is a Squier Telecaster, a Vox Pathfinder 10, and just about any instruction book. Telecasters are very versatile, and well suited for rock and indie. Vox Pathfinders are cheap, but fairly good quality for their low price, and can match the versatility of the Telecaster. The instruction book doesn't matter so much, because once you decide you like the instrument you should take lessons.

But don't take my word as law. Chances are I'm horribly mistaken and really biased.

Controlpanel
02-22-2011, 03:31 PM
May I be the first to say Welcome!


Alrighty-First off, I would say that your choice of an Ibanez is good, as they are very good quality for the money. Many will argue that they are strictly for rock/metal only(as you have noticed) but with a simple pickup change, any Ibanez can be made as versatile as many other guitars out there. (The stock pickups one Ibanez's guitars are made for metal playing, but you can get other pickups that are more suited for clean playing.) (The pickup is the small, often black/grey rectangle underneath the strings.)

First of, I wouldn't go for a grg series, although they are good beginner guitars, you'll wish you had something slightly higher quality. I would recommend staring off with one of the Rg series, or, if you want to spend the money, an RGA series, either of which are good, very affordable guitars.

(If you were really feeling spendy, you could get the Esp Mp-600-Michael Paget's (B4MV) signature guitar, but thats $1000.)

Regardless of which you go for, Good body (and fourtuneatly common) woods are Mahogany, Maple (for the top) and Basswood. other woods are good quality too, but those are the common preferences.

Once you've purchased your guitar, you'll be needing an Amp. I would caution you for going for the biggest and best right off the start (EG- A Marshall Half-stack) as many get lost in that mentality and turn out horrible guitarist for it. I have a Fender Frontman 25R that I like quite a bit, plenty of Power and Gain, works well for most of my stuff (Some people dont like them, as they are a bit fidgety, but once you work in your sound, they are quite wonderful) Mine was $99

I would caution against the smaller amps, such as the 15 watt ones made by Ibanez and fender. As they are OK quality, they are rather fragile and (IMHO) sound like crap. Stick with 20 watt or higher.

Many Players have effects pedals, which greatly enhance the range and style of music they are capable of. I would suggest going down to your local music store and explaining your situaion to one of their older, more expirienced employees. I cannot offer much advice here I as recently aquired my first Workstation. My only helpful advice might be-DONT BUY THEM ALL- buy one. maybe to and expand your collection from there.

Also, get some lessons under your belt, learn theory, and get the basics down before you move on. it will help tremndously.

SumFX
02-22-2011, 03:31 PM
You think Muse and The Beatles are Indie? Wow.

On to the topic at hand, Squire Telecasters are pretty nice and cheap.
Or you could go with a starter pack, its not like you need anything amazing atm.

guitarman1992
02-22-2011, 03:39 PM
Well got here a bit late, basically listen to the advice these other guys have told you. Oh and just go to a nearby guitar store ( guitar center for example) and play everything you can, you're sure to find something you like. I'd go for a Fender Stratocaster or Telecaster personally, they're extremely versitle. Good luck man, hope you find a guitar you love to play.

Adam98150
02-22-2011, 04:04 PM
@Guitarman1992 - I've always wanted to go into a guitar store, only thing is, would I be making a fool of myself considering I've only ever picked up a guitar once or twice?

@SumFX - What exactly would you call them? I live in the UK, and they are known as "the creators of indie". I put Muse in there, because, I label everything Indie . . as do all of my friends. :)

Are they more "Rock"? Anyway, thanks for the advice, I've heard the Telecaster is rather decent for a first guitar. I'll check it out further! But I've always wanted something with a little "zoom" if you get me?

@Controlpanel - Holy cow, that's some seriously nice advice. And thanks for the welcome.

Hmm, I didn't realise the GRG isn't of the best quality. I'll definitely have a look at the others you've recommended, the Signature guitar is unfortunately out of my price range, but I bet it's damn worth all the money. I'll compare the reviews and so forth of the Rg and the RGA against the GRG, see which suits me the most as of now.

The wood I was having problems with, thanks for the input, I'll know what to look out for now.

Yep, totally forgot to put anything about an amp in my original post. The frontman looks good, and I'm liking the price too. I've also been checking out the "Peavey Vypyr 30" - but that's a little on the expensive side.

I've read little on effects pedals, but I have researched them somewhat. Once I get the basics down, they are my next stop. :D

Right, the lessons thing, I'm planning to learn solo. I've got plenty of time to learn theory, and I get a little on edge around people I don't know. Plus this way it's plenty cheaper! I've heard Youtube is a good source of learning too. I've already made a bookmark folder which I'm planning to fill with articles and other useful information (already have three entries in there).

Thanks again man!

@TextOnTheScreen - Hey man, I've always had this thing where If I'm going to do something, I want to do it with something unique. Something few others have . .

I'm guessing plenty of people have the telecaster, ha ha. Yep, and judging by the reviews, they are indeed incredibly versatile! Now, I've never heard of the Vox, this will be googled immediately. ;)

@kaosxrocker - Thanks for the first reply! Now I've heard the Les Paul as well as the Yamaha are great guitars, are the Pauls not a little on the pricey side though? I've got a decent budget, but I need an amp too! I'll take a peek at the Agiles as this is the first I'm hearing of them.

------

Cheers guys! Great help so far! :D

Edit:

Right, the Vox amp is rather cheap, what's the catch if there is one? Ha ha. I'm loving the look of the Ibanez RGA series - the 32 as well as the 42. They look brilliant!

http://www.guitarguitar.co.uk/large/102/09013016525528.jpg

Beautiful! :D

Now are the RGA more or less versatile than the GRG's? Is replacing the pickups easily done? I'm still in awe at that guitar and colour. :cool:

I've looked into the Epiphones, not as expensive as I first thought! Although, it doesn't particularly stand out to me. Although the reviews do rave about them, I'll youtube someone playing. Plus they do look very versatile. : )

Now, the Yamaha's. Wow, they sure do a lot of guitars! Huge range to choose from, which is always good.

The Agiles, well, I found this site. http://www.squidoo.com/agileguitars
Loving the guy playing! There build quality looks fantastic, and apparently they're not on the pricey side. I'm liking what I'm hearing.

biga29
02-22-2011, 04:25 PM
@Guitarman1992 - I've always wanted to go into a guitar store, only thing is, would I be making a fool of myself considering I've only ever picked up a guitar once or twice?



If they are good sales people then they will help out and understand that everyone knew nothing at first.



Right, the lessons thing, I'm planning to learn solo. I've got plenty of time to learn theory, and I get a little on edge around people I don't know. Plus this way it's plenty cheaper! I've heard Youtube is a good source of learning too. I've already made a bookmark folder which I'm planning to fill with articles and other useful information (already have three entries in there).


Yeh, plenty of people learn on their own. I did, and it's also never to late to start lessons. Even experienced guitar players take lessons from more experienced guitar players.

Also, the Vyper 30 is a great beginners amp, and Agile make very good guitars for the price if you live in the States.

:cheers:

Adam98150
02-22-2011, 06:20 PM
If they are good sales people then they will help out and understand that everyone knew nothing at first.




Yeh, plenty of people learn on their own. I did, and it's also never to late to start lessons. Even experienced guitar players take lessons from more experienced guitar players.

Also, the Vyper 30 is a great beginners amp, and Agile make very good guitars for the price if you live in the States.

:cheers:

Cheers man, and yeah I've heard good things about that particular amp! And I'm sure I could ask someone I know to help me out if I'm struggling. :)

Controlpanel
02-22-2011, 06:52 PM
Yup! I consider the Ibanez RGA to be on of the most versatile from the Ibanez Line.


And yes, Ibanez makes some very pretty guitars.

http://www.ibanez.com/HollowBodyGuitars/model-AG95


gots my eye on this one...

oneblackened
02-22-2011, 07:08 PM
May I be the first to say Welcome!


Alrighty-First off, I would say that your choice of an Ibanez is good, as they are very good quality for the money. Many will argue that they are strictly for rock/metal only(as you have noticed) but with a simple pickup change, any Ibanez can be made as versatile as many other guitars out there. (The stock pickups one Ibanez's guitars are made for metal playing, but you can get other pickups that are more suited for clean playing.) (The pickup is the small, often black/grey rectangle underneath the strings.)

First of, I wouldn't go for a grg series, although they are good beginner guitars, you'll wish you had something slightly higher quality. I would recommend staring off with one of the Rg series, or, if you want to spend the money, an RGA series, either of which are good, very affordable guitars.

(If you were really feeling spendy, you could get the Esp Mp-600-Michael Paget's (B4MV) signature guitar, but thats $1000.)

Regardless of which you go for, Good body (and fourtuneatly common) woods are Mahogany, Maple (for the top) and Basswood. other woods are good quality too, but those are the common preferences.

Once you've purchased your guitar, you'll be needing an Amp. I would caution you for going for the biggest and best right off the start (EG- A Marshall Half-stack) as many get lost in that mentality and turn out horrible guitarist for it. I have a Fender Frontman 25R that I like quite a bit, plenty of Power and Gain, works well for most of my stuff (Some people dont like them, as they are a bit fidgety, but once you work in your sound, they are quite wonderful) Mine was $99

I would caution against the smaller amps, such as the 15 watt ones made by Ibanez and fender. As they are OK quality, they are rather fragile and (IMHO) sound like crap. Stick with 20 watt or higher.

Many Players have effects pedals, which greatly enhance the range and style of music they are capable of. I would suggest going down to your local music store and explaining your situaion to one of their older, more expirienced employees. I cannot offer much advice here I as recently aquired my first Workstation. My only helpful advice might be-DONT BUY THEM ALL- buy one. maybe to and expand your collection from there.

Also, get some lessons under your belt, learn theory, and get the basics down before you move on. it will help tremndously.
Bolded 1: Ignore this part. There are plenty of good low wattage amps out there.
Bolded 2: Also ignore this. The player makes the style, not the effects.
I would say that you might want to start with something like an Ibanez RG321 or a squier Classic Vibe Stratocaster. The first is more suited to heavier stuff, where the second is more suited towards cleaner sounds. This is not to say, however, that the first one can't do blues and the second can't do metal - it's all the player.

Controlpanel
02-22-2011, 07:17 PM
Bolded 1: Ignore this part. There are plenty of good low wattage amps out there.
Bolded 2: Also ignore this. The player makes the style, not the effects.
I would say that you might want to start with something like an Ibanez RG321 or a squier Classic Vibe Stratocaster. The first is more suited to heavier stuff, where the second is more suited towards cleaner sounds. This is not to say, however, that the first one can't do blues and the second can't do metal - it's all the player.


In case you were so hasty as to not read my ENTIRE POST, I said that IMHO (In-My-Humble-Opinion) smaller 'practice' amps sound bad. I DID NOT SAY THAT ALL OF THEM SOUND BAD. Im sure there are many fine ones out there, just none of the ones I've tried have held up at all. Trust me, there is nothing more frustration for a new play than to go through 2-3 amps in the first couple months (I've been there, I know).

What I ment with the pedals was; Pedals can increase your range, not the domain.

Domain=where you are in your playing (Style, progress, what have you)
Range= The ability to do something with those styles-BEYOND what can already accomplish without pedals.


P.S- You're comments were restating what others (including myself) have already said. If thats all you can contribute, perhaps not posting would be the best alternative.

Munroe
02-22-2011, 07:23 PM
If you're planning on learning via YouTube, then I have two words for ya; Marty Schwartz.

Adam98150
02-22-2011, 07:40 PM
@Controlpanel - That's one hell of a nice guitar dude, liking the finish. If I had the cash I wouldn't hesitate. :D

RGA is in the lead so far . . I'm still looking into the others, there's plenty of choice out there!

@oneblackened - No need at all for that man, the user you're referring to has been incredibly helpful. All of his comments seem to match my research. And, as stated, the telecasters/strats are out of the question.

Cheers though! ;)

@Munroe - I'll bookmark his videos! : )
There are some crazy good musicians on Youtube.

BTKA
02-22-2011, 08:27 PM
Also if your an ipod user I would recommend Beginners Guitar video podcast (it's free!)!

If not then go with Marty Schwartz on You tube.

My best advise is try not to cross over learning different things from different tutors as you'll find yourself taking one step forward and two back! (Been there done it!)

Adam98150
02-22-2011, 09:51 PM
Also if your an ipod user I would recommend Beginners Guitar video podcast (it's free!)!

If not then go with Marty Schwartz on You tube.

My best advise is try not to cross over learning different things from different tutors as you'll find yourself taking one step forward and two back! (Been there done it!)

iPod FTW! Never thought about podcasts, I shall listen on the bus. : )

Willowthewitch
02-28-2011, 04:22 AM
Anyhow, I was looking at the Ibanez GRG170DX or some form of Fender since I like all kinds of music - electric would be my preferred choice, but if anyone has any acoustic suggestions, please let me know!

Now the Ibanez is strictly Rock / Heavy so I've been told, luckily I enjoy bands such as Bullet so that would fit the bill pretty nicely. But I also enjoy the occasional Indie band. (Muse, Strokes, Beatles, Hoosiers, Kasabian and so forth)

Now, this is a big hurdle, I have no idea about all the terms and things you guys use on here. You know "Fret board" and all that sort of stuff. The material used for the guitar . . which brands are considered "good" and which are considered "poor".

I'm in dire need of help, and sorry if this is the wrong place, but I couldn't see a more fitting place for my thread.



The first thing you have to realize is that everyone has different opinions and they're very much subjective.

Far as the terms go ask and most people we be willing to explain them.

Actually the Ibanez you were looking at isn't all that bad. Frankly you can play a lot of styles on just about any guitar.

I personally think anything with the word Squire in it belongs in a rubbish bin.

Personally I think the Jackson JS series are some of the best for the money. You can get a pretty decent Axe (guitar) for around 300 bucks.

Both Ibanez and Jackson are considered to be hard rock and Metal guitars. The reasons are complex but what makes a good hard rock or Metal guitar also makes a good blues classic rock guitar.

Just to tell you how much I like the Jackson JS series I own two of them...
It has to do with some mechanical things regarding non standard tunings. Which isn't relevant to this thread :p:

lawrenceherbert
02-28-2011, 04:25 AM
The guitar is a plucked string instrument, usually played with fingers or a pick. The guitar consists of a body with a rigid neck to which the strings, generally six in number, are attached. Guitars are traditionally constructed of various woods and strung with animal gut or, more recently, with either nylon or steel strings. Some modern guitars are made of polycarbonate materials. Guitars are made and repaired by luthiers. There are two primary families of guitars: acoustic and electric.

Adam98150
02-28-2011, 10:39 AM
^ Cheers man! That actually helped a little.

I now know what a pick-up is and what it does! So I am learning.

http://en.euroguitar.com/images/products/86/135400-js32rt-dinky-med.jpg

Wow, Jacksons are pretty cheap. I'll take a look at a few reviews and what not.

JustRooster
02-28-2011, 11:51 AM
Jackson makes fine instruments. Even their lower priced ones are pretty good. Just keep in mind that if you go for a guitar that's not in a beginner pack you'll also have to field the costs of amp, cable, tuner, strap, gig bag, etc. Of course if you never leave the apartment, sit down and play, and can use an online tuner by ear, you'll just need the first two.

Personally, if you want versatility I would steer clear of guitars with active pickups. There are two types of pickups; active and passive.

Active pickups are identified usually by the flat black look. As you can see on the picture of the Ibanez and the Jackson you posted, they both have flat black pickups. Active pickups require a battery inside the guitar to power them and get their response.

Passives, however, use their wounding to create a magnetic field and as a result pick up on the guitars sound. Passives are noted by visually seeing the screws in the top of the pickup. Sometimes you can't see the screws because there might be a metal cover over it. You'll see this a lot on Gibson, Epiphone, and PRS usually.

Actives tend to have a more sterile sound, but can handle gain exceptionally well (gain is the amount of distortion you have). They're very well suited for metal and jazz-like cleans, but are somewhat weak on other categories. If you want something that will handle just about everything you'll want passive pickups.

Another thing is that I would VERY MUCH SO discourage you from getting a Floyd Rose on your first guitar. Most metal guitars (which is what you seem to gravitate towards) have what's called a 'tremolo.' That's the whole whammy-bar system. They're very had to get in tune, and a paint to deal with to change tunings. It requires patience and guitar knowledge. I'm not saying you can't learn, I'm just saying that going with a fixed bridge (such as the one you can see in you Jackson picture) would be so much easier to learn with than a floating tremolo (as you can see in your Ibanez picture).

If you have anymore questions or want recommendations, you can PM me.

shmeegle
02-28-2011, 12:52 PM
Stay away from active pickups as mentioned above. Maybe a few years down the road you might decide you like 'em, but at this stage of your playing they won't make a difference and are really just a pain in the ass.

Stay away from Floyd Rose Tremelos, an absolute nightmare for restringing and tuning. Again further down the road you might want one, but right now they'll be more hassle than they're worth.

Don't be afraid to shell out a little bit more for a guitar, Not 1000 bucks, but around 400 bucks maybe? That way if guitar doesn't work out for ya you can maybe sell it off for 300 and you're not losing out too much. People are more likely to buy a decent guitar than a piece of crap. Also, playing a nice guitar will encourage you to stick with it:)

Don't pay attention to any of this "oh that guitar is only suited to metal" BS. You can play anything on any guitar. True, some are more suited to particular styles than others but theyre not restricted to one particular genre. Go into a guitar shop, pick up a few, hold them, fret a few notes. If the guitar feels good in your hands, and it's in your budget, go for it.

Ibanez make very versatile guitars, at a wallet friendly price. Be wary of their tremelo bridges though. Get a fixed bridge (strat type, Tune-o-matic) if you can. Makes keeping the guitar in tune a lot easier IN MY OPINION.

An Epiphone les paul could also be a good start, maybe a little bit heavy (weight wise).

I'm not a big fan of squire stuff, but maybe they've upped their game a little bit lately. I hear good things about the classic vibe guitars.

Amp Wise, 20 watts will do you fine. I wouldn't go for a tube amp at this stage, as you have to be pretty careful with em, and they require more maintenance. Take a look at the new fender Mustang amps maybe? I had a play off one recently. Had some nice cleans.

Effects wise, Probably not really necessary at this stage. You could go for an overdrive maybe? Boss OD-1 or DS-2 maybe?

Adam98150
02-28-2011, 02:01 PM
@shmeegle - I guess the RGA32 is out of the question then? I mean, I had my heart set on it for now. But apparently it has active pick-ups (and floating bridge), I'll have a look and see if they do some form of passive pick-up with the same specs.

Trust me, I'll get the guitar I truely want, non of this "get a cheap one first" . . I want it to be special, you know, something I'll keep for years to come. Otherwise, what would be the point in forking out the cash? Telecasters/strats are nice and all, but they're not something I'm into - I def want something different, slightly unique in style.

Fixed bridge! Got you, that should narrow down the choice. Tuning looks difficult, I don't want to make it anymore difficult for myself.

The amp, well, I don't need a very high wattage one at all. I was thinking 15 - 25 at the most.

Jacksons and Ibanez seem to speak out to me - they have some very pretty guitars.

@JustRooster - I want to pick up all of my gear individually, so no starter packs. And thanks for the active and passive explanations - didn't realise you could tell visually, that's def very helpful.

If I were to get one with active pick-ups and a floating bridge, just how difficult would it be compared to fixed and passive pick-ups?

Cheers guys. ; )

Dave_Mc
02-28-2011, 03:11 PM
good call on avoiding the starter packs. You can get exactly what you want that way.

Personally if you play a wide range of stuff including metal and also more indie type stuff, I'd get something like a fat strat- yamaha pacifica 112v is nice for beginner-type budgets, though if you have more money you can get nicer.

Amp, something like a vox valvetronix (if you lean more towards lighter stuff) or roland cube 30x (avoid the lower wattage ones as they don't have the amp models, which are why the cube is good in the first place- apart from the microcube which does have models) for heavier stuff for the amp would be cool. peavey vypyr is meant to be good too for heavier stuff, but i haven't tried it.

What's your overall budget, and what country are you in? (affects prices and availability)

While double-locking trems are a bit harder to set up than fixed bridges, they're not the end of the world as long as you're willing to stick to the one tuning. However, the big problem is that the quality of locking bridges on cheaper guitars tends to be terrible. Even a pro technician won't be able to make a floyd keep in tune if the knife edges are worn away. The more expensive, good quality locking trems (e.g. Schaller-made Original Floyd Rose, Schaller double locking tremolo, Gotoh GE1996TC, Ibanez Edge, Lo-pro edge and edge pro (those exact terms... Ibanez has other trems with similar names, like edge III, which are rubbish)) use hardened steel for the knife edges so they'll stay in tune and feel positive in use, and have brass (or at least decent-quality metal with a lot of mass) sustain blocks so the tone is good.

That's the problem. They're very much the kind of thing where if you're going to do it, you need to do it right. Which means getting a good quality one, which means more expensive guitars.

shmeegle
02-28-2011, 03:12 PM
@shmeegle - I guess the RGA32 is out of the question then? I mean, I had my heart set on it for now. But apparently it has active pick-ups (and floating bridge), I'll have a look and see if they do some form of passive pick-up with the same specs.

Fixed bridge! Got you, that should narrow down the choice. Tuning looks difficult, I don't want to make it anymore difficult for myself.

The amp, well, I don't need a very high wattage one at all. I was thinking 15 - 25 at the most.

Jacksons and Ibanez seem to speak out to me - they have some very pretty guitars.



I wouldn't say rule it out completely! Personally I'm not a fan of active pickups, I don't think 9V batteries belong in guitars is all really. And it's another (although somewhat minor) expense. One day you'll plug in your guitar, it'll sound like shit and if you don't have a battery on you it's just a pain. I find strings and cables are enough of a concern.

From what i can tell the bridge on that is a fixed (non-trem) bridge. So you should be fine with that!

15-25W is all you need for now really. Check out those Fender Mustang amps, or The Roland cubes. Try not to get sucked into the Line6 Spider thing. Your local store will prob try and sell you one, but don't do it. Avoid Marshall MGs too (you could do worse, but you could def do better). I hear the peavey Vypyr modelling amps are okay too, they start at a 30W i think.

Jackson are pretty tasty too, they do a lot of Floyd models though. If Ibanez and jackson are your thing, check out The LTDs too. They do some nice low end models.
I'm an Ibanez man all the way though. If it's versatility you're after Ibanez are a safe bet.

Arby911
02-28-2011, 03:23 PM
I personally think anything with the word Squire in it belongs in a rubbish bin.



I personally think that the advice of anyone who can't even spell the name of the guitar they are trying to slam belongs in the rubbish bin...

BTW, tell it to Jeff Healey, John Mayall, Robin Trower or any of the other well known musicians who have used Squiers over the years...

Arby911
02-28-2011, 03:25 PM
Michael Kelly Patriot Decree, exceptional performance for the price.

http://www.michaelkellyguitars.com/patriot_decree.html

Adam98150
02-28-2011, 03:52 PM
@shmeegle - Ha ha, yes. My oiled Ibanez RGA has a fixed bridge - after reading the reviews, I think I can manage with the active pick-ups.

There's just another problem, I'm kinda small for my age. Someone I know said they bought a guitar which was 3/4 of the size of a standard one - does it really matter THAT much? I mean, I'm over 5ft (5 and a half I think) - it's not going to be difficult to hold and what not is it?

The Ibanez, I don't know, just looks insane to me. I'm going to have to see it at a store I reckon - have a play around with it.

Now . . knife edges? trem? Whammy- bar? Ha ha, obviously you know more than I. ;)

Yep, I've looked into the "peavey Vypyr" as you may have read, it seems like a really great amp. I've also had a look at the fender someone posted about on the previous page, which seems like a great bit of kit for the price!

I'm still looking into the Jacksons - great looking guitars, I'll check out the LTD's too! :)

@Dave_Mc - Yep, I'm def not after a starter pack. You know, I want my gear to be chosen by myself - and only myself.

Heard of the VOX and I've looked into them, never heard of the Roland though. Although, they do look nice now I've googled them.

I'm from the UK - and have a decent budget. I'm thinking 500 for the Guitar and amp alone - that's 700 dollars? I think anyway. I can stretch if need be - but my Ibanez RGA series is 320 quid. which seems pretty decent - Most of the Jacksons seem to be around 250 - 300 quid too. So they're well within my budget, too.

Dave_Mc
02-28-2011, 04:10 PM
ah if you're in the UK I'm well up with prices there as I'm in NI.

Washburn X50pro is very nice for around the 300 mark, has real duncan pickups and all. No fretboard inlays, though (it has side dots ok), so that may or may not annoy you. Might be easier to learn on one that has inlays.

Yeah I mean you're not really going to go wrong with either the cube (as long as you don't buy the 15x or 20x, for the reasons I already said), vypyr or valvetronix- maybe even the fender mustang (it's pretty new, I haven't tried it yet). Just some are more aimed at heavier music, some more at lighter.

The thing I would say, though, is if you have ~500, make sure you don't buy a starter guitar, as you don't have to. You can get pretty nice guitars for around 300-400. I mean the japanese-made Jacksons should be under your budget (the pro series) with real duncan pickups, and japanese guitars generally are pretty darn awesome. I'm not fussed on the trem that comes on the cheaper japanese jacksons, but the dk2T is a hardtail version.

Again, they look a bit more metal/hair metal, if you want something that's a bit more vintage in character (but from the sounds of it you like the more metal-looking guitars, which is fine).

EDIT: holy crap, I just checked jackson prices. They've gone through the roof. :( I picked up a dkmgt a couple of months ago for 330 (granted that was a killer deal, the oxford guitar gallery was having one of its awesome sales), now they're about 700. Even the pro series are up to about 600.

I don't think they're worth that. :(

Adam98150
02-28-2011, 04:27 PM
I was looking at the Jackson JS series, which seem to be under the 300 mark. And yes, since I have a decent budget, there's no point in getting a "starter" guitar - such as a telecaster/strat/squier.

I wanted something different. Now the Ibanez and Jacksons seem to suit me. And yes, I'm into some heavier stuff - but also progressive rock and indie. Do the pick-ups affect tuning at all? Or is that just the bridge?

I've looked into the Fender Frontman, which seems like a solid amp - nice price too. The Mustangs I'll look into, but since they're fairly new, I'd expect the price to be a little higher, but worth it I'm guessing.

Yep, not really into the vintage look - especially with the "rounded" look - like a lot of the Les Pauls. Loving most of Ibanez's range though, very nice look - some cool looking finishes too.

Now, Washburn? Hmm . .

http://www.dv247.com/assets/products/44667_l.jpg

They look pretty damn cool, the type of style I'm definitely after.

Dave_Mc
02-28-2011, 04:33 PM
yeah, you seem to like superstrats. That's perfectly fine (I do too, though I like most guitars :D), they're generally pretty versatile too.

I'd say the washburn is a massive step up from the jackson js series (having not actually tried the js series, but as far as i'm aware, they're beginner guitars). Only problem is the lack of fretboard inlays, especially if you're only starting out and learning, you might get lost- as i say, it has side dots, so it's not like there's nothing to let you know where you are, but yeah, it might make it harder than it needs to be.

Pickups shouldn't affect the tuning, no.

I'd avoid the frontman, with the advent of decent modelling amps at decent prices, there's not much point in those solid state practice amps, if you ask me.

EDIT: if you don't like the lack of inlays on the washburn, maybe consider this?

http://www.andertons.co.uk/electric-guitars/pid19444/cid556/esp-ltd-h401fm-with-seymour-duncans-in-amber-cherry-sunburst.asp

It's a little more than the washburn, but it's on offer, and the specs are similar. I haven't tried it, but the general consensus seems to be that 400 series and up LTDs are where they start getting good.

Adam98150
02-28-2011, 04:43 PM
Now, I'm guessing "inlays" tell you what strings you're strumming? That correct? :)

Yep, I sure do love that particular style. I know it's not all about aesthetics - but I'd like to have a guitar I like the look of.

And since pick-ups don't affect tuning, my Ibanez is still on the list.

And fair enough on the Frontman - the Mustangs are decently priced, a 40W is around the 140 mark. So I'm guessing the lower end models are even cheaper. A 20W "closed back" is 80 - 90. I'm liking the price.

The 20W is the Mustang I - the lowest model they have.

Solid state amps? Closed back amps? :)

Dave_Mc
02-28-2011, 04:52 PM
yeah, inlays are those dots you can see on the fretboard.

closed back means there's a bit of wood (on cheaper amps it's probably MDF or something like that) on the back, so it's like a closed box. You can also have open-back, where there's no back panel (or a smaller one, leaving some open space). Generally speaking, closed back sounds punchier and more focussed and is better for heavier stuff, while open-backed fills the room more and sounds more 3D, and is better for lighter stuff.

That being said in an amp that small I doubt it makes much difference :D

solid state means transistors or op-amps, stuff like that. More expensive amps tend to use valves, which sound awesome, but they're also quite expensive (not that much... i mean you can get small low wattage valve amps starting at under 100, but they're not very versatile). You also often have to turn them up a bit for them to sound good (not all that much, and it depends on the amp, more expensive valve amps sound good at low volumes too).

Anyway, with the existence of modelling amps now (amps which digitally model more classic valve amps, so you have access to a range of tones), I don't see much point in those solid state practice amps, because the modelling amps are often no dearer, and give you a range of tones which normally sound as good as (if not better than) those cheap practice solid state amps.

shmeegle
02-28-2011, 08:31 PM
Just looking on thomann.de there, the 20W mustang is going for 88.40, so i guess in shops you'd be paying maybe 100-110? Pretty decent price and it's really not a bad amp. I'd consider it!

Fender Mustang on thomann (http://www.thomann.de/gb/fender_mustang_i.htm)
Mustang Demo/review (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iiq6TQ9VZTw)

When it comes to guitar size, ibanez are pretty small. Most superstrat style guitars are really, so if you're worried about your guitar looking HUGE on you don't worry about it. Actually, pretty much all electric guitars are fairly slight, (BCrich are an exception, yeugh. And big bluesy hollow bodies, but they're pretty)

The 3/4 size could either be acoustic (acoustics can be pretty big) or it could be a short scale guitar, which are pretty much for kids to the best of my knowledge.

Now, I'm guessing "inlays" tell you what strings you're strumming? That correct? :)

Close, Fret markers:) They generally appear on the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 12th, 15th, 17th, 19th and 24th frets. They just give you an indication of where you are, They're helpful for learning notes on the fretboard.

Closed back amps? :)

I may be wrong here, but I think a closed back gives it a little more volume. It's just a wooden panel on the back of the amp, you can remove it if you feel the need, I like mine closed.

Dave_Mc
03-01-2011, 04:31 PM
oh yeah if you're 5'6" get a full-size guitar. Those 3/4 size ones are for like 8 year olds. :D

JustRooster
03-02-2011, 01:44 PM
Checking back into this thread.

That washburn above would be a fantastic starter. I learned on a cheap washburn, in fact. Fine guitars. I also would reccomend looking into blackstar for a first amp. I have an ht-5 for my apartment practicing and I love it for the size and price.


EDIT: Closed back amps aren't louder, they just give you a different characteristic on tone. Open backs sound wider and reverbier. Closed backs are tighter and more forceful.

Adam98150
03-06-2011, 09:30 PM
The Washburn does look incredible! I managed to get a hold of my mates Strat the other day, I didn't feel comfortable with it at all - plus it's not really my kind of style.

@Dave_Mc - And I wonder why that guy told me he had a 3/4 size guitar, pretty strange . . Full size it is! :D

And thanks for the amp info, I'm learning - only slowly. Apparently this is going to take some dedication, but I'm up to it. I'm still looking into the Fender Mustang, seems decent for the price!

@shmeegle - I'm glad Ibanez are pretty small, I was looking at a Fender Bass at my friends and it's huge! I mean, really big! Wouldn't suit me at all, glad I'm going electric and not electric bass.

Cheers for the fret info!

@JustRooster - I'll look into it further. : D