Advice for a n00bie


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smirnoff76
08-11-2012, 02:24 PM
Hi All

I have finally got Guitar and a couple of books to get me started (Chord book & Guitar for dummies) and am now a couple of days in to getting started though am having to take a day off due to sore fingers.

Everyone here clearly had to start learning at some point so my question is what advice would you give to someone who is just starting out? By this I mean what do you think I should be focusing on now and in the future?

Any advice would be appreciated.

ihartfood
08-11-2012, 02:29 PM
I'd suggest lessons. Not really that expensive if you find a teacher who is starting out. Like, $15-$20 would be reasonable for a new teacher, someone experience, $30. (a lesson). I'm saying this because most people I tell they need lessons say they're too expensive.

slashfan226
08-11-2012, 02:33 PM
Pretty much what that guy said ^
But to put in the right currency, I guess about 10 per half hour is about right

Basti95
08-16-2012, 12:44 PM
Lots of people get by without lessons. I'm perfectly happy with my playing and i taught myself everything, so i have to disagree with the above.
The Guitar Techniques section of UG is extremely helpful, i suggest you have a thorough look through the lessons.
Apart from that,
- be veeeery patient: you need to be relaxed as much as you can to get anything right. Might seem counter-intuitive but even to shred you need good, solid bases that come from practising with patience.
- take all the information you can, but with a pinch of salt: every guitarist knows something that another guitarist doesn't, you can always learn something new. However, there are ways of doing things that work for some and not for others, you have to find your own comfort zone and build from there.
- playing along with a metronome does wonders to more than one aspect of your playing.
(in case you don't own one: metronomeonline.com)
- play with others. That's what friends are for, and other players are an invaluable resource, even if it's not other guitarists. For example, drummers will help you a great deal with your rhythm.
- in terms of technique: the fretting hand is quite straightforward, start with the pentatonic and all its positions just to get an idea of your fretboard, after which you can mould your own sound with all the notes that there are. As for the picking hand, many will tell you not to anchor, but the important thing is that your wrist always acts as the pivot for your hand, resting it a bit on the lower strings can actually help a lot with stability.

Don't hesitate to ask in case i didn't make sense :p: have a blast :cheers:

TheMadison1103
08-21-2012, 09:48 PM
I've been playing for about 5 years now. What I find best is to definitely take lessons if you are a complete beginner. Lessons will help you more because your guitar teacher can tell you exactly what to do instead of a computer screen telling you what to do, because if you have a teacher you can ask questions. Guitar lessons are usually $30 an hour. If you can find them for that amount you got a good deal. But guitar books are a really good idea if your tight on money. If your a more self taught person then you can use books. I still learn new songs in guitar books if I have spare time.

TheMadison1103
08-21-2012, 09:50 PM
I completely agree with you. Lessons are pretty much a must for a complete beginner guitarist.

Bdqdog
08-22-2012, 01:29 AM
A good teacher will point out what you're doing wrong and how to improve. There is a lot knowledge on here too. For the next year or so just worry about building up your playing skills and learning songs. PATIENCE is a requirement. It'll take some time before you can start to learn full songs. Don't bother learning any theory since you really wont have the skills necessary to apply it for about a year depending on how much you practice. PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE it can be a pain in the ass but it's worth it. Whenever you have questions save them for your guitar teacher or come on here. Also have your teacher teach you about the guitar and the names of all the parts and how amps work, so that when you go out to buy a guitar/amp you'll know what your looking at. Also, don't be afraid to learn music out of your musical tastes. Unless you really hate that band (for me it's greenday) then try to learn it. It will help you learn new techniques.

adamgur96
08-22-2012, 08:20 AM
What everybody here said was true....

Any way my advice is start with an acoustic \ nylon guitar. when people start playing with an electric guitar they skip over a huge part of skills. Practicing hammer-ons and pull-offs on an electric is easy, but on a acoustic it's harder which means = better.
Learn all the chords you can, and all the notes on the fertboard. this will help alot in the future.

Welcome to the guitar family! :) :cheers:

justsomekate
08-25-2012, 01:57 PM
Hi just read this and all the comments,,, some really good advice but it's really a personal thing,,, whatever seems to work for you. I can only say from my experience, like everyone else, but I had never picked a guitar up 4 years agot my brother and friends use to play and they went on tour and left a guitar so, lol, I went to the library and got a few chord books, nothing to do with theory, and then found songs that I knew, with the least amount of chords in as possible lol, and just went from there lol. I learnt E A and D and found with a bit of patience I could play quite a few songs. Maybe it's much better with lessons, I wouldn't know lol, but it all depends on the person. I know people who have played for years longer than me and have had lessons and they are much worse than me,, but obliously there will be the opposite. So in short I would learn a few chords to some songs you know,, Bird on a wire is great,, quite a few T Rex songs are the same chords. Also it's much easier with songs you know really well so maybe try some traditional songs or ever nursery rhymes as they might help with timing :0) Anyway lol BOTTOM LINE,,, just do what works for you!! XOXOX GOOD LUCK!!

Laughingravy
08-27-2012, 04:24 PM
Slowly build up the callouses, learn 10 chords and then hunt out your fave songs...

Practice Practice Practice and NEVER put the guitar in it's case, leave it next to you on the sofa and when the break comes on the tv pick it up.....

silingna
09-09-2012, 12:47 AM
A good teacher will point out what you're doing wrong and how to improve. There is a lot knowledge on here too. For the next year or so just worry about building up your playing skills and learning songs. PATIENCE is a requirement. It'll take some time before you can start to learn full songs. Don't bother learning any theory since you really wont have the skills necessary to apply it for about a year depending on how much you practice. PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE it can be a pain in the ass but it's worth it. Whenever you have questions save them for your guitar teacher or come on here. Also have your teacher teach you about the guitar and the names of all the parts and how amps work, so that when you go out to buy a guitar/amp you'll know what your looking at. Also, don't be afraid to learn music out of your musical tastes. Unless you really hate that band (for me it's greenday) then try to learn it. It will help you learn new techniques. :) http://www.sticky-language.com/qin.jpg

MrStrat9999
09-09-2012, 02:09 PM
- learn the fretboard and what note is on which fret is extremely important both now and later on
- learn basic open chords major(G, D, C, A, E) and minor (Emi, Ami, Dmi). This should get you able to play a lot of songs, which will make playing much more enjoyable, and you will be more likely to stick with it.
- learn power chords and the E, A, Emi, and Ami shape barre chords. These can be moved around the neck, so you can play every minor and major chord (in multiple places :D)
- Learn the first (Ionian) major scale and commit it to memory. If it isnt too hard, learn the natural minor (Aeolian) scale too.
- practice technique exercises. these can be easily found online, and will help with your right and left hand speed. be sure to practice with a metronome.
- in terms of technique, dont worry about it too much. many people (including most teachers) will tell you to play on your fingertips, but if that is uncomfortable to you, don't. I play on the flats of my fingers and I know few people who can play considerable faster than me. As for your right hand, just be comfortable, but make sure that when you hit the strings, dont be on an angle so that your pick (assuming you use one) makes any extra scratching noise. I had this problem, and it was a hard habit to break. Make sure to nip it in the bud early.

If you have any questions about what I wrote, don't hesitate to ask!

arthur_s
10-02-2012, 09:11 AM
taking paid lessons is the best choice because this is where you're investing your money wisely. You will have to invest money in guitar education because you can't do it on your own. There're many things and scales to know. Start with paid guitar basics:)