The History of Sublime


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MisterChainsaw
02-26-2005, 09:59 AM
For people who do not know, Sublime is their own style of music. They took Thrash-Punk and mixed Ska and Dub riffs, threw it all together and made one of the most amazing and original sounds music has ever seen. Sublime consisted of frontman Bradley Nowell on Guitar and Vocals, Floyd Gaugh AKA 'Bud' on Drums and Eric Wilson on Bass Guitar. Brad also had a dog named Lou, which went everywhere with the band. Even to the recording studio.
Sublime started off as a band in 1988 when they played their first gig in Long Beach, California; their hometown. This gig not only started a small riot, but boosted their popularity due to their explosive lyrics and genre-collaborating style. One person remarked on Sublime as 'The below average garage punk band that every teenage kid wants at their party.' The group of friends have went from backyard slackers to a musical trend.
The major hysteria started when in 1992, when Bradley and close friend Miguel pawned off all of the bands musical equpiment and formed their own label, Skunk Records. They immediately started recording and finished their debut/self distributed album '40oz. to Freedom.' The album had no publicity at all and the band were selling the records themselves. Bradley said that 'We were practically selling the albums out of the trunks of our cars.'
40oz. to Freedom was recorded for under $1,000 and instantly became a success in the underground Punk Scene. The record stayed on the Billboard's 'New Alternative Artist' chart for 50 weeks, and being in the top 20 for the last 30. It spent 5 weeks at number one. The record became an indie icon, and was a necessity with all of the locals due to its tranquil lyrics and refrences to how great Marijuana is. Unfortunetly, the band's signature track 'Get Out,' referring to the bands approach on creating music, was cut from the record.
In 1994, the band's second album Robbin' the Hood was released. They thought of it as an experimental masterpiece, and an album that they expanded their horizons on. This record was also on Skunk and was very tightly budgeted. On four tracks of the album, the band had to record in abonded houses and living rooms of friends in various areas of the LBC, along with some charitable free time from Mr. Brett (Epitaph), from the legendary West Beach Studios.
Some of West Beach's recorders include The Minutemen, Bad Religion and The Decendents. Robbin' the Hood, a mix of fastly spoken word, dub riffs and raggae, was never meant to be a follow up to 40oz. to Freedom, it was just a compilation of run-over songs that the band wrote for 40oz. to Freedom. Robbin' the Hood's electric sound and strong lyrics caught the attention of thousands of listeners.
In 1996, Sublime came out with thier self-titled album. This was the one that would make Sublime huge. With singles such as Doin' Time, Wrong Way, Santeria,and What I Got, Sublime got a large following across the country. The song What I Got won the 1997 MTV Video Music Award for Best Alternative Video. Sublime's self titled album is arguably their greatest album, it produced the most hits and got the most attention in the music industry. It made the band a national trend.
Over the course of ten major tours, a van and a motor home, the band had infected the country with their sound, and were a natioal craze. They felt especially at home when they were at cities that strongly held the surf/skate crowd, much like Long Beach. One one occasion during the Sno-Core Tour in Colorado, the band destoryed their hotel room, only later to destroy the ski resort they that hed the hotel.
One of Sublime's most memorable tours, the Three Ring Circus Tour, touring with The Lordz of Brooklyn and The Westly Willis Fiasco. This tour was Sublime's attempt to prove that three obviously different genres can come together to make a good show. Another memorable tour was teh Band Aid III tour, which featured Sublime and Bad Religion as their featured artists.
As the tour went on, things started changing. The band still stayed together and went strong, but addiction slowly started infecting one of the band members. Bradley Nowell started using heroin and cocaine, and was becoming irritable and nauseous when going without it. Bradley's addiction became a major concern for Bud and Eric, who had been Brad's lifelong friends for almost 10 years. As long as Bradley was on heroin, he was going to slowly start to bring the band down.
Then on May 25th 1996, it happened. Bradley Nowell was found dead of a heroin overdose. The death of Bradley devastated Eric and Bud, and was a national tragedy among fans all over the country. After his death, the band decided not to find a replacement and form a new band, crowned the Long Beach Dub All Stars.
he All Stars were a popular band in the LBC Scene, but barely made any noise in the music industry. Bradley Nowell will never be forgotten, and was one of the most influential musicians of the 90's. Sublime made their own unique sound, and that sound will be remembered, but never re-done.

//MisterChainsaw//