tuning stbility guide (rough)


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sillybuuger12
08-20-2005, 02:18 PM
there are two main ways of sorting your tuning stability, the first and most effective is locking tuners such as sperzal's gotoh or schaller's

http://g-cat.co.kr/new_page/img/product/schaller/2000m.jpg

what this does it to do somthing simmilar to the floyd rose's locking nut and make certain that the strings cannot slip, and on a hard tail this will end virtually all tuning issues, however it does cost a small amount of money and there are instalation issues such as the fact that the hole needs enlarging to accomadate the new machine head.

the second method is free and is not just one thing but several.

i'll start from the top of the guitar and work down,

first take a look at your machine heads, if they are rather loose take a small screw sriver and tighten the screw in the middle of the button you turn. if it is bone/ wood take care not to over tigten you will split it
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a256/rhyd/img0042.jpg

while we are on machine head when you re-string make sure the string is wrapped round the post at least 3 times to prevent slippage, which wrecks your tuning.

second, take a look at your nut there could be two problems here, the worse of the two is that the groves are too tight and squezing the string, a tempory solution is to put graphite (pencil lead) in there either coulor the slot in or drop in powder. A more permanant solution is to somply widen the slots with nut files. if you are not confident about doing this your self take it to a pro as you can really damage your guitar if this goes wrong.

your nut could benefit from some graphite in there anyway though to decrease friction which is a major cause of tuning instability, unless it's locking in which case this section is irrelevant.
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/GenSetup/Nuts/NutsViews/goodnut.JPG

Finaly trems. unless it is locking (even then if it's a cheap model you'll have greif from it) it will go out of tune fairly fast. if you don't use it lock the trem and turn it into a hard-tail this can be done either by adding/tightening the springs in the back so it can't move or wedging it with bits of wood. Or even both if you want to go for over kill. However if you use it quite a bit then you need to reduce the amount of friction once again graphite is your friend, but it can only do so much before you find whaat you need is actualy a better trem

Mascot
08-20-2005, 02:57 PM
Revised and edited. Spelling and grammar fixed.




There are two main ways of sorting your tuning stability: The first and most effective is locking tuners, such as Sperzel, Gotoh or Schaller.

http://g-cat.co.kr/new_page/img/product/schaller/2000m.jpg

What this does is to do somthing similar to the Floyd Rose's locking nut, and make certain that the strings cannot slip. On a hard tail, this will end virtually all tuning issues, however it does cost a small amount of money and there are installation issues such as the fact that the hole needs enlarging to accommodate for the new machine head.

The second method is free and is not just one thing but several.

I'll start from the top of the guitar and work down.

First, take a look at your machine heads. If they are rather loose take a small screw screwdriver and tighten the screw in the middle of the button you turn. [B]if it is bone/ wood take care not to over tigten you will split it
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a256/rhyd/img0042.jpg

While we are on machine head, when you re-string make sure the string is wrapped round the post at least 3 times to prevent slippage, which wrecks your tuning.

Second, take a look at your nut - there could be two problems here, the worse of the two is that the groves are too tight and squeezing the string. A temporary solution is to put graphite (pencil lead) in there either by couloring the slot in or dropping powder. A more permanent solution is to simply widen the slots with nut files. If you are not confident about doing this yourself, take it to a professional as you can really damage your guitar if this goes wrong.

Your nut could benefit from some graphite in there anyway, though, to decrease friction which is a major cause of tuning instability, unless it's locking in which case this section is irrelevant.
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/GenSetup/Nuts/NutsViews/goodnut.JPG

Finally, trems. Unless it is locking (even then if it's a cheap model you'll have grief from it) it will go out of tune fairly fast. If you don't use it, lock the trem and turn it into a hard-tail - this can be done either by adding/tightening the springs in the back so it can't move or wedging it with bits of wood. Or even both if you want to go for over kill. However if you use it quite a bit then you need to reduce the amount of friction. Once again graphite is your friend, but it can only do so much before you find what you need is actually a better trem.




Now, this entire article is pretty average. There are a lot of things that aren't necessarily false, but it isn't very accurate and is worded badly.

SilentDeftone
08-20-2005, 03:06 PM
My machine heads have no screws in the end like the picture.

-SD :dance:

sillybuuger12
08-20-2005, 05:06 PM
***************************************
There are two main ways of sorting your tuning stability:
NB. parts of method two apply to method one like the bit about trems)

Contents:
Method 1 (fitting locking machine heads)
Method 2:
1 Machineheads
2 The Nut
3 Tremelos
4 Strings
5 String trees

Method 1
The first and most effective is locking tuners, such as Sperzel, Gotoh or Schaller.

http://g-cat.co.kr/new_page/img/product/schaller/2000m.jpg

What this does is to do somthing similar to the Floyd Rose's locking nut, and make certain that the strings cannot slip. On a hard tail, this will end virtually all tuning issues, however it does cost a small amount of money and there are installation issues such as the fact that the hole needs enlarging to accommodate for the new machine head.

The second method is free and is not just one thing but several.

I'll start from the top of the guitar and work down.
Method 2
1. Machineheads
If they are rather loose take a small screw screwdriver and tighten the screw in the middle of the button you turn, however not all have this most do but not all (thanks Silent Def you akward sod). if it is bone/ wood take care not to over tigten you will split it
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a256/rhyd/img0042.jpg

While we are on machine head, when you re-string make sure the string is wrapped round the post at least 3 times to prevent slippage, which wrecks your tuning.

2.The Nut
there could be two problems here, the worse of the two is that the groves are too tight and squeezing the string. A temporary solution is to put graphite (pencil lead) in there either by colouring the slot in or dropping powded grahite (breack a pencil open and crush the lead to make this). A more permanent solution is to simply widen the slots with nut files. If you are not confident about doing this yourself, take it to a professional as you can really damage your guitar if this goes wrong.

the second is just friction from the string pressing ainst the nut once again this can be solved wit some graphite in there to the decrease friction which is a major cause of tuning instability, unless it's locking (ie floyd rose) in which case this section is irrelevant.
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/GenSetup/Nuts/NutsViews/goodnut.JPG

3. Tremelos
Unless it is locking (even then if it's a cheap model you'll have grief from it) it will go out of tune fairly fast. If you don't use it, lock the trem and turn it into a hard-tail - this can be done either by adding/tightening the springs in the back so it can't move or wedging it with bits of wood. Or even both if you want to go for over kill. However if you use it quite a bit then you need to reduce the amount of friction. Once again graphite is your friend, but it can only do so much before you find what you need is actually a better trem.

4. Strings
When you change your strings stretch them. this will get most if not all of the excess "give" in them, personaly i stretch them as far as possible for 60 seconds each, and have absolutely no problem from them. However this may differ between gauges ( i use 9's)

The other thing to take into acount is down tuning, unless your Tony Iommi and chopped the tips of your fingers off, don't downtune 9's to drop C! They will be too floppy and go out of tune, do a Stevie Ray and compensate with a heavier guage (just don't go overboard and use 18's like he did at one point)

5. String trees
these don't appear on all guitars but on those the do have them make sure they are not screwd down too far. You need SOME downward angle on them but not to much or you will create too much friction both here and also at the nut.
**************************************

reformatted and added to it
does it need anything more?

Mascot
08-24-2005, 12:52 AM
1. Spell check/grammar check. ( I'm too lazy to do this again, sorry. )

2. It seems kind of stupid, how "number 1 of #1", and "number 1 of #2" is the exact same topic: machine heads. You're making too big of a deal out of machine heads, like they're the be all end all to tuning issues. Truth be told, there isn't a humongoues difference between $30 Grovers and $125 LSR locking tuners. Sure, the LSR's are amazing, but my Grover's need tuning once a month.

3. Too many incorrect statements. . . To be honest, I don't approve of this, at least not yet.

sillybuuger12
08-24-2005, 01:15 PM
ok i'll look it over when i get back from redding festaval this is a flying visit between a holiday and a festaval

sillybuuger12
08-30-2005, 12:42 PM
***************************************
Sick of your guitar going out of tune? well there are things you can do to help.I'll start from the top of the guitar and work down.

Contents:
1. Machineheads
a. Fitting Locking Tuners
b. Other Tricks
2. The Nut
3. Tremelos
4. Strings
5. String trees

1. Machineheads
a. Fitting Locking Tuners
The first and most effective is locking tuners, such as Sperzel, Gotoh or Schaller.

http://g-cat.co.kr/new_page/img/product/schaller/2000m.jpg

What this does is to do somthing similar to the Floyd Rose's locking nut, and make certain that the strings cannot slip. On a hard tail, this will end virtually all tuning issues, however it does cost a small amount of money and there are installation issues such as the fact that the hole needs enlarging to accommodate for the new machine head.


b. Other Tricks

If your Machineheads are rather loose take a small screw screwdriver and tighten the screw in the middle of the button you turn, however not all have this most do but not all (thanks Silent Def you akward sod). if it is bone/ wood take care not to over tigten you will split it
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a256/rhyd/img0042.jpg

While we are on machineheads, when you re-string make sure the string is wrapped round the post at least 3 times to prevent slippage, which wrecks your tuning.

2.The Nut
there could be two problems here, the worse of the two is that the groves are too tight and squeezing the string. A temporary solution is to put graphite (pencil lead) in there either by colouring the slot in or dropping powded grahite (breack a pencil open and crush the lead to make this). A more permanent solution is to simply widen the slots with nut files. If you are not confident about doing this yourself, take it to a professional as you can really damage your guitar if this goes wrong.

the second is just friction from the string pressing ainst the nut once again this can be solved wit some graphite in there to the decrease friction which is a major cause of tuning instability, unless it's locking (ie floyd rose) in which case this section is irrelevant.
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/GenSetup/Nuts/NutsViews/goodnut.JPG

3. Tremelos
Unless it is locking (even then if it's a cheap model you'll have grief from it) it will go out of tune fairly fast. If you don't use it, lock the trem and turn it into a hard-tail - this can be done either by adding/tightening the springs in the back so it can't move or wedging it with bits of wood. Or even both if you want to go for over kill. However if you use it quite a bit then you need to reduce the amount of friction. Once again graphite is your friend, but it can only do so much before you find what you need is actually a better trem.

4. Strings
When you change your strings stretch them. this will get most if not all of the excess "give" in them, personaly i stretch them as far as possible for 60 seconds each, and have absolutely no problem from them. However this may differ between gauges ( i use 9's)

The other thing to take into acount is down tuning, unless your Tony Iommi and chopped the tips of your fingers off, don't downtune 9's to drop C! They will be too floppy and go out of tune, do a Stevie Ray and compensate with a heavier guage (just don't go overboard and use 18's like he did at one point)

5. String trees
these don't appear on all guitars but on those the do have them make sure they are not screwd down too far. You need SOME downward angle on them but not to much or you will create too much friction both here and also at the nut.
**************************************

reformatted again, you mentioned mistakes Mascot where are they?

SilentDeftone
09-02-2005, 12:29 AM
***************************************
Sick of your guitar going out of tune? There are things you can do to help. I'll start from the top of the guitar and work down.

Contents:
1. Machineheads
...a. Fitting Locking Tuners
...b. Other Tricks
2. The Nut
3. Tremelos
4. Strings
5. String trees

1. Machineheads
a. Fitting Locking Tuners
The first and most effective is locking tuners, such as Sperzel, Gotoh or Schaller. This sentence makes no sense to me, clarify please. First?

What this does is to do somthing similar to the Floyd Rose's locking nut, and make certain that the strings cannot slip. On a hard tail, this will end virtually all tuning issues, however it does cost a small amount of money and there are installation issues such as the fact that the hole needs enlarging to accommodate for the new machine head. I can't help but wonder HOW it does that?_ I'm a n00b at this.


b. Other Tricks

If your machineheads are rather loose take a small screwdriver and tighten the screw in the middle of the button you turn, however not all have this most do but not all (thanks Silent Def you akward sod). If it is bone or wood take care not to overtighten, because you will split it.

While we are on machineheads, when you re-string make sure the string is wrapped round the post at least 3 times to prevent slippage, which wrecks your tuning.

2.The Nut
There could be two problems here, the worse of the two is that the grooves are too tight and squeezing the string. A temporary solution is to put graphite (pencil lead) in there either by coloring the slot in or dropping powdered graphite (break a pencil open and crush the lead to make this). A more permanent solution is to simply widen the slots with nut files. If you are not confident about doing this yourself, take it to a professional as you can really damage your guitar if this goes wrong.

The second is just friction from the string pressing against the nut. Once again this can be solved with some graphite in there to the decrease friction which is a major cause of tuning instability, unless it's locking (i.e. floyd rose) in which case this section is irrelevant.


3. Tremelos
Unless it is locking (even then if it's a cheap model you'll have grief from it) it will go out of tune fairly fast. If you don't use it, lock the trem and turn it into a hard-tail - this can be done either by adding/tightening the springs in the back so it can't move or wedging it with bits of wood. Or even both if you want to go for overkill. However if you use it quite a bit then you need to reduce the amount of friction. Once again graphite is your friend, but it can only do so much before you find what you need is actually a better trem.

4. Strings
When you change your strings stretch them. This will get most if not all of the excess "give" in them, personally I stretch them as far as possible for 60 seconds each, and have absolutely no problem from them. However this may differ between gauges (I use 9's).

The other thing to take into acount is downtuning, unless you're Tony Iommi and chopped the tips of your fingers off, don't downtune 9's to drop C! They will be too floppy and go out of tune; do a Stevie Ray and compensate with a heavier gauge (just don't go overboard and use 18's like he did at one point).

5. String trees
These don't appear on all guitars but on those the do have them make sure they are not screwed down too far. You need SOME downward angle on them but not too much or you will create too much friction both here and also at the nut.
**************************************

Blue is my comments and should be deleted in the final draft. Also I'm not sure pictures will work in lessons.
Red is grammatical/spelling errors. I strongly suggest you fix them.

-SD :dance:

sillybuuger12
09-02-2005, 04:12 AM
***************************************
Sick of your guitar going out of tune? There are things you can do to help. I'll start from the top of the guitar and work down.

Contents:
1. Machine heads
...a. Fitting Locking Tuners
...b. Other Tricks
2. The Nut
3. Tremelos
4. Strings
5. String trees

1. Machine heads
a. Fitting Locking Tuners
The first and most effective method of sorting out tuning issues is locking tuners, such as Sperzel, Gotoh or Schaller

What this does is to do something similar to the Floyd Rose's locking nut, and make certain that the strings cannot slip by clamping them down at the tuner instead of the nut. On a hard tail, this will end virtually all tuning issues, however it does cost a small amount of money and there are installation issues such as the fact that with some lucking tuners (eg Gotoh) the hole for the machine head in the headstock needs enlarging to accommodate for the new tuner

b. Other Tricks

If your machine heads are rather loose take a small screwdriver and tighten the screw in the middle of the button you turn, however not all have this most do but not all (thanks Silent Def you akward sod). If it is bone or wood take care not to over tighten, because you will split it.

While we are on machine heads, when you re-string make sure the string is wrapped round the post at least 3 times to prevent slippage, which wrecks your tuning.

2.The Nut
There could be two problems here, the worse of the two is that the grooves are too tight and squeezing the string. A temporary solution is to put graphite (pencil lead) in there either by colouring the slot in or dropping powdered graphite (break a pencil open and crush the lead to make this). A more permanent solution is to simply widen the slots with nut files. If you are not confident about doing this yourself, take it to a professional as you can really damage your guitar if this goes wrong.

The second is just friction from the string pressing against the nut. Once again this can be solved with some graphite in there to the decrease friction which is a major cause of tuning instability, unless it's locking (i.e. Floyd rose) in which case this section is irrelevant.


3. Tremelos
Unless it is locking (even then if it's a cheap model you'll have grief from it) it will go out of tune fairly fast. If you don't use it, lock the trem and turn it into a hard-tail - this can be done either by adding/tightening the springs in the back so it can't move or wedging it with bits of wood. Or even both if you want to go for overkill. However if you use it quite a bit then you need to reduce the amount of friction. Once again graphite is your friend, but it can only do so much before you find what you need is actually a better trem.

4. Strings
When you change your strings stretch them. This will get most if not all of the excess "give" in them, personally I stretch them as far as possible for 60 seconds each, and have absolutely no problem from them. However this may differ between gauges (I use 9's).

The other thing to take into account is down tuning, unless you're Tony Iommi and chopped the tips of your fingers off, don't down tune 9's to drop C! They will be too floppy and go out of tune; do a Stevie Ray and compensate with a heavier gauge (just don't go overboard and use 18's like he did at one point).

5. String trees
These don't appear on all guitars but on those the do have them make sure they are not screwed down too far. You need SOME downward angle on them but not too much or you will create too much friction both here and also at the nut.

Well hope that helped you out and I hope you stay in tune a little better for longer
Sillybuuger12
**************************************
Right I?ve run it through Microsoft word so that should sort it

The pics are usually posted in as links by the column/ lesson staff so no worries there

SilentDeftone
09-02-2005, 04:31 PM
I approve of this lesson.

-SD :dance:

Rankles
09-02-2005, 04:40 PM
APPROVED