A2 chord?


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Epiphany
10-23-2005, 02:19 PM
In this song that Im learning theres an A2 chord and I went to the all chord chart in the lessons section and I couldnt find an A2 chord? And I also couldnt find a C#m7.......so am I just missing something or what, but could someone please tell me what these two chords are.

seljer
10-23-2005, 02:25 PM
A2....my guess is that Asus2 was what they meant

Asus2
x02200


and C#m7
x46454

young_is_god
10-23-2005, 02:25 PM
C#m7

4
5
4
6
4
x


sorry cant help on A2

Sugar man
10-23-2005, 02:27 PM
Try this site

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/

Egrodyne
10-23-2005, 02:31 PM
sometimes it can mean a different postion such an open A or A at the 5th fret barred.....

Marcel Veltman
10-23-2005, 04:08 PM
I think Seljer is right on this. I found this A2 chord once in a chord sheet of a song of which I have a recording, and Asus2 exactly matches the sound of that A2 thing. Try it and trust your ears.

FroDaddy
10-24-2005, 08:07 AM
Seljer is right on both chords. Just so you know the theory behind the construction of the Asus2 chord....First of all, a major chord is made up of the root, 3rd, and 5th degrees of the major scale. Therefore, with an A major chord, you have A, C#, and E as the constructing notes. This chord is called A suspended 2 because the 3rd (C#) in the chord has been taken away or "suspended" by the 2nd note (B) from the A major scale. I'm guessing you've also seen the Asus4. From what I've just told you (if it's clear enough), you should be able to tell me what an Asus4 chord is or any sus4 chord at all.

Logz
10-24-2005, 08:16 AM
This chord is called A suspended 2 because the 3rd (C#) in the chord has been taken away or "suspended" by the 2nd note (B) from the A major scale. I'm guessing you've also seen the Asus4. From what I've just told you (if it's clear enough), you should be able to tell me what an Asus4 chord is or any sus4 chord at all.

Asus2 is different to A2.

Asus2 implies the intervals 1 2 5, removing the need for the Major 3rd.
A2 implies 1 2 3 5, adding the 2nd and keeping the 3rd. You can also call this chord Aadd9

FroDaddy
10-24-2005, 09:17 AM
Oh, yeah you're right. I guess I was concentrating on what Seljer said.

funtimesman
06-11-2010, 07:18 PM
please paypal me a $1 if this is helpful to funtimesman@live.com

you guys are right imho to an extent because the popular way (note not necessarily to experienced musician correct way) to look at A2, in internet land is the second version of a normal a chord the tabber put up, like with the highest sounding note being the third scale tone like C# instead of the fifth, like E. however, i always try to use the shortest notation to get across the chord, for example Emaj7 is EM7 to me. wiki for "chord notation" its great! so A2 to me is what I used when (because of issues with Chordsmith or chordpro format or fitting songs into a word processor down to a paragraph or less for easy reading/playing, for example Chorsmith presents problems when the chord notations get long because the next word in lead sheet won't start until the chord notation above it ends, thus taking up valuable character space on a line...i really hate when songs go on for more than one page in a word processor.) I need to write a chord that includes the major triad for an A chord (A, C#, and E, the 1, 3, and 5 scale tones) and a second or ninth scale tone (the same not here B, but the ninth is like an octave higher than the 2nd) because writing Aadd9 takes up 5 characters, but A2 is nice and short. i don't write A9 because
that implies a 7th scale tone is included (usually the minor 7th) but A2 lets you know that you don't include the seventh, just the major triad plus a ninth or a 2nd (to me those are pretty much the same thing, although playing the second and the root together can sound to dense when they are separated by only two half steps, but not always...)

The second way is to use 2 instead of 9, implying that it is not a 7th chord:

* C2

Note that in this way we potentially get other ways of showing a 9th chord:

* C7add9
* C7add2
* C7/9

Generally however the above will be shown as simply C9, which implies a 7th in the chord. Added chord notation is useful with 7th chords to indicate partial extended chords. For example:

* C7add13

This would indicate that the 13th is added to the 7th, but without the 9th and 11th.

The use of 2, 4 and 6 as opposed to 9, 11 and 13 pretty safely indicates that the chord does not include a 7




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_notation

"Added Chords

An important characteristic of jazz is the extensive use of sevenths. The combination of 9th (2nd), 11th (4th) and 13th (6th) notes with 7ths in a chord give jazz chord voicing their distinctive sound. However the use of these notes is not exclusive to the jazz genre; in fact they are very commonly used in folk, classical and popular music generally. Without the 7th, these chords lose their jazzy feel, but can still be very complex. These chords are called added chords because they are basic triads with notes added. Added chords can be described as having a more open sound than extended chords. Notation must provide some way of showing that a chord is an added chord as opposed to extended. There are two ways this is shown generally, and it is very common to see both methods on the same score. One way is to simply use the word 'add':

* Cadd9

The second way is to use 2 instead of 9, implying that it is not a 7th chord:

* C2

Note that in this way we potentially get other ways of showing a 9th chord:

* C7add9
* C7add2
* C7/9

Generally however the above will be shown as simply C9, which implies a 7th in the chord. Added chord notation is useful with 7th chords to indicate partial extended chords. For example:

* C7add13

This would indicate that the 13th is added to the 7th, but without the 9th and 11th.

The use of 2, 4 and 6 as opposed to 9, 11 and 13 pretty safely indicates that the chord does not include a 7th unless specifically specified. However, it does not mean that these notes must be played within an octave of the root, nor the extended notes in 7th chords should be played outside of the octave, although it is commonly the case.

It is possible to have added chords with more than one added note. The most commonly encountered of these are 6/9 chords, which are basic triads with the 6th and 2nd notes of the scale added. These can be confusing because of the use of 9, yet the chord does not include the 7th. A good rule of thumb is that if any added note is less than 7, then no 7th is implied, even if there are some notes shown as greater than 7.

Similarly, even numbers such as 8, 10 and 12 can be added. However, these double the main triad, and as such are fairly rare. 10 tends to be the most common; it can be used both in suspended chords and (with an accidental) in major or minor chords to produce a major-minor clash (e.g. C7(♭10) indicating the Hendrix chord of C-E♭-E-G-B♭). However, because of enharmonics, such chords can more easily, and perhaps more intuitively, be represented by ♯2 (or ♯9) for a minor over a major or ♭4 for a major over a minor. In any other case, an 8, 10 or 12 simply indicates the respective note from the triad doubled up one octave."

tenfold
06-11-2010, 07:45 PM
A2? Maybe they mean Aadd9? Post the chord chart if possible.