Bass through P.A system?


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radio_schizo
12-04-2005, 12:06 PM
Would it be ok to play the bass straight into the P.A. mixer without an amp for a small show? Becuase I have a gig soon and my amps broken, and I could have sworn I read somewhere that you can do this.

Plus, when recording you can plug it straight into the mixer, so I don't see why you wouldn't be able to for this.

Thanks.

Bumper
12-04-2005, 12:24 PM
Yeah, it's fine.

UtBDan
12-04-2005, 12:26 PM
^ not necessarily true.

If you have a bass with passive pickups, you need a DI Box.


Even with that, the PA system needs some subwoofers and not just normal PA cabs to handle the bass. Otherwise, it can and will explode on you. And you don't want that.

telemaster1952
12-04-2005, 12:28 PM
^ not necessarily true.

If you have a bass with passive pickups, you need a DI Box.


Even with that, the PA system needs some subwoofers and not just normal PA cabs to handle the bass. Otherwise, it can and will explode on you. And you don't want that.

^not necessarily true either

if you are using a passive bass, to boost the bass you want a DI box but it will work fine without one, subs would be a good idea, but depending on how high you want to go with the bass

Bassilo
12-04-2005, 01:03 PM
I played a gig (look at my Your Worst Gig thread - pics there) in a small restaurant, it had a P.A there with 2 12" speakers. It worked. WIth a passive bass - there's a gain knob for that on a p.a. Since I have an active one, gain was on like a 3 for me.

FunkMaster
12-04-2005, 01:11 PM
DI is needed when sending the signal a long way to the desk. A DI doesn't amplify the sound, it can reduce the sound though, but it converts the signal from an unbalanced to a balanced signal. So active and passive basses will get a DI between bass and amp most of the time.
Subwoofers isn't a must have, but a prefer have. Having subs will make your sound better. Having a lot of power is a must have. A 200w PA wont be enough for vocals and bass.
So it all depends on the size of the PA.

radio_schizo
12-04-2005, 01:36 PM
Sorry, but what is a D.I box? I think I have a vague idea.

seljer
12-04-2005, 01:44 PM
Sorry, but what is a D.I box? I think I have a vague idea.

direct input box

used for taking instrument/mic level signals to line level signals and turning unbalanced signals into balanced ones

radio_schizo
12-04-2005, 01:50 PM
Surely can't you do that with the mixer aswell?

UtBDan
12-04-2005, 02:09 PM
direct input box

used for taking instrument/mic level signals to line level signals and turning unbalanced signals into balanced ones

actually, its direct inject, but no one ever wants to say that.

I don't know if you can do it with a mixer, I was just always taught that passive basses would damage the PA without a DI. And as far as I was taught, that was basically the DI's only purpose.

FunkMaster
12-04-2005, 03:30 PM
Every decent mixer has a balanced (XLR or stereo jack) and unbalanced input (mono jack).
So if you're standing 3 meters away from the desk, you can plug in directly.
However, most FOH desks are about 30m away from the stage. An unbalanced signal cable is more sensitive to noise and hum (anyone recognises the radio/telephone signals comming from their amps??). The longer the cable, the more risk. To avoid this, they transform the signal into a balanced signal.
Another thing is that most stage blocks (that is the end of the multicore cable on stage with the female XLR, the other end is at the FOH desk)- if not all stage block - use balanced xlr signals.
If you want more info on DI's, do a google search. Terms: "direct injection box" or "DI box"...

and seljer, the don't put a DI between mics and desks. DI's just convert unbalanced to balanced. it converts instrument to mic(/line) levels. The switch between mic and line levels hapens at the desk.

Bumper
12-04-2005, 04:24 PM
SO.....it will work.

FunkMaster
12-04-2005, 05:08 PM
^depending on the size of the pa...

83lespaulstudio
12-04-2005, 06:34 PM
thank you, Funkmaster for that very accurate and informitive explanation.
you guys listen up, there is alot to be learned, here. :cool:

playing through a P.A. should work fine. i have done it several times. but it does effect the sound. going through the P.A. puts you out in front of the drums, and guitars. your sound will reach the audience first. not really a big problem with guitars(high fequency), but unless you mic the kick drum, it could sound out of phase.
this phasing effect makes it hard to get a tight, bottom end. pardon the pun. :cool:

fitzsy05
12-05-2005, 09:25 PM
gits fine to plug it into the PA, just turn the treble up and drop the strings. also, with the sound level levers turn them all down to the lowest setting. dont forget (dont plug it in with a mike as well).

83lespaulstudio
12-06-2005, 07:12 PM
gits fine to plug it into the PA, just turn the treble up and drop the strings. also, with the sound level levers turn them all down to the lowest setting. dont forget (dont plug it in with a mike as well).

there is no need to adjust the bass set-up, to play through a P.A. :cool:

Johnnymacbrown
07-24-2012, 08:11 PM
Depends on the room characteristics and the number of people.... A PA speaker can only handle so much output. They work the hardest when they are pushing bass waves. Your amp uses the most wattage when bass waves are being produced. In a small venue with only a few hundred people its best not to line-in the bass. The less the PA has to do the better the quality it can reproduce. Bass waves are omni directional and are high energy. Above 1500 cps the lower the energy level the waves have and therefore the more they have to be aimed toward the listener
When you buy a home theater system the bass cabinet can be placed anywhere but the speakers which provide the high end are positioned toward the listener.

Tostitos
07-24-2012, 08:18 PM
How do you even dig up an almost 7 year old thread?