how many watts do i need to be heard over drums?


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Chancelor101
01-22-2006, 08:57 PM
How many watts does the guitars and bass need to be heard over drums?

Uncle Salty
01-22-2006, 09:08 PM
Solid State, I would say about 30 for guitar, Bass at least 50
Tube for guitar: about 15 or 25
those are just my rough estimates, however

Chancelor101
01-22-2006, 09:13 PM
well i played with a 50 solid state all of the way up and i couldntnt hear it, but i was in a very small room when we played. but i have about 80watts now and we'll be playing in a garage, so...i guess that will work?

The Nameless666
01-22-2006, 09:13 PM
get a 75 watt if you are in a band and will be playing any kinds of shows

mw7
01-22-2006, 09:14 PM
ive been playing with my solid state 30 watt amp with drums. it could make it, but the sound quality is very bad, since my amp is turned up so high. for a solid state amp i would recommend 50 watts and over though. for tube, 30 watts at least. bass 65 watts and up

Chancelor101
01-22-2006, 09:17 PM
THANKYOU!!! we have a cheap pa that will make the guitars loud enough and we have a 60w bass amp.

patroller69
01-23-2006, 04:35 AM
WE always use about 50/60 watts and thats fine ! :liplick:

cokesodanotdrug
01-23-2006, 06:40 AM
uh..well, my guitarist used to play with a 15w amp and I could hear him over my drums, and I was beating the **** out of my drums, but I'd say 30w should do it at the very least, if you wanna be safe just get 100w to work with, turn it down if you need to (need as in NEED) and leave it up otherwise :p:

Rocker4500
01-23-2006, 01:28 PM
WE always use about 50/60 watts and thats fine ! :liplick:


I use a 60 and it knocks em dead! Also, if you have access to a PA system then you could either mike up your amp or line out into the PA system. So it doesn't really matter if you've got a small solid state. As long as it's not a rubbish little pratice amp then you should be fine.

apc--ibanez
01-23-2006, 09:27 PM
i use a 65 and thats fine. i use to have a 15 and that never worked

Chancelor101
01-24-2006, 10:43 PM
great then im set. thanks all

legions
01-25-2006, 02:23 AM
i use a 120watt.... so, i've never really had problems... but my guess would be at least 75....60... or something in that range...maybe, it depends on what style of music kind of, and it depends on how hard the drummer plays

golfskip
01-25-2006, 02:54 AM
I've used a 15wt stereo chorus Peavey on some pretty big stages and it's enough to get it mixed with the drums .(everything is running through the PA.)
As far as the bass rig, nothing less than 100wt ov

That_Pink_Queen
01-25-2006, 03:46 AM
My 2 watt Roland Microcube can be played w/ drums...all depends on the individual amp and speaker efficiency.

Rocker4500
01-25-2006, 11:53 AM
Also, the first time I played in a jam/band situation, the drums where miked up, and my 60 watt Roland Cube wasn't. I turned up to 10 and heard nothing whatsoever.

paul filth
01-25-2006, 01:54 PM
me and a friend are sort of doing a really small gig (no drummer) and this place is a hall that sits about 200 people, will a 15watt and 10watt amp do it!?

Lennon321
01-25-2006, 01:57 PM
Our drumer is so loud we need 120 to match it for both bass and guitar.

I used to use a 30 watt for bass and I had to turn it all the way up to hear the damn thing. It was so raunchy we called it phaser bass

golfskip
01-29-2006, 01:39 AM
Our drumer is so loud we need 120 to match it for both bass and guitar.

I used to use a 30 watt for bass and I had to turn it all the way up to hear the damn thing. It was so raunchy we called it phaser bass
:mad: put him in a plexi glass cage!

jfbrown42
02-03-2006, 08:23 PM
Once we got a drummer, I moved up from my little Crate practice amp to a Peavey Renown (a solid-state Twin Speaker Combo Amp) with 160 watts. It's still going strong 20+ years later.

NFFC_1865
02-04-2006, 09:18 PM
me and a friend are sort of doing a really small gig (no drummer) and this place is a hall that sits about 200 people, will a 15watt and 10watt amp do it!?

No. They wouldn't even do a rehearsal!

C3_Rocka
02-06-2006, 08:10 AM
My 2 watt Roland Microcube can be played w/ drums...all depends on the individual amp and speaker efficiency.


What? 2 watts?

AK Guitarist
02-07-2006, 12:08 AM
What? 2 watts?

Those Micro Cube's have some serious balls, I tell ya!

I played with a drummer at church with my Cube 30 when I was in Texas and I had no problem being heard with the amp cranked around 3.5. It really depends on the size of the room and the drummer, though.

If you've got a competent drummer who knows how to play at a sane level, then 30w SS will get you heard, even in a small room, where as some drummers (ie My current drummer) just beat the hell out of the heads and symbols and I have a hard time being heard with my 5150 half stack unless I'm cranked over halfway.

Sir Edwin CBE
02-07-2006, 02:29 AM
**** - 15W solid state or tube should do, but ideally you'd want 30W so you're not risking damaging anything and it gives you more flexibility.

The-Kicks
02-07-2006, 03:11 PM
30watts at least.

rathmusbass
02-12-2006, 03:58 AM
the thing about amps is that you should have an amp that if at full blast you would drown out your drummer. You should never drown them out, but you should get an amp that could, because then you will be able to comfortably be heard without pushing the amp too hard.

jajp001
02-13-2006, 12:55 PM
I use a hundred watt amp with 6 inputs. The lead guitar gets put in the High z input, rythm in second one and bass in fourth or fifth. If you've got anything like this, it does the job.

RainMustFall
02-14-2006, 08:45 PM
I was using my 15 watt at my friend's house (thank God I'm replacing it this week), and he was playing drums. Turned up halfway, I was playing a single-note type progression rather audiably, but when I tried to throw in some chords, it got drowned out. I dunno why, maybe because playing the chord forced the amp to share the volume between many strings and it got drowned out.

wakemxbmx89
10-16-2007, 04:20 PM
i have a crate 65 watt tube amp and thats enough but it doesnt blow the drummer away
and i have a 120 watt bass amp and thats good at a low level but when you get it all going you cant hear any high end stuff

davibrods
10-17-2007, 04:33 PM
me and my guitarist friend can hear each other fine with microcubes over drummer mans drums. in fact, i didn't even have to turn it past the volume i normally practise at anyway.

willieturnip
04-26-2008, 04:53 PM
Ive got a 100watt marshall 2x12 into an 800watt pa. Seems to do the job ;).
Not doing my ears any good though..

Wonthefu
04-26-2008, 05:58 PM
I can easily hear my 5W Valve Junior over drums and vocals in my basement...

scguitarking927
04-26-2008, 09:09 PM
get a 100 watt if your going to be buying a 65 or 70 watt amp, they're usually only about 50 or 60 dollars more depending on what brand you get. Like i got a Marshall MG amp 100 watt. It was only about 60 dollars more than the 50 watt. save your money and just invest in a 100 watt.

grampastumpy
04-26-2008, 09:59 PM
For bass, AT LEAST 150 to get some degree of audibility, at least 200 to sound decent.

t3h guitar n00b
04-27-2008, 04:53 AM
15 watt for guitar, and about 30 watt for a bass works for rehearsals. My rhythm guitarist has a crappy fender frontman, and a few pedals, and on about 7 or 8 is perfect for practice.

pugnapugnapugna
04-27-2008, 10:22 AM
15 watts tube is easily enough to be heard over drums. 5 watts tube will even cut it.

WhyteChocl8
04-28-2008, 09:32 PM
I play a Dean bass and have a Kustom amp that is 65watt and I had it about 3/4 of the way and it was sounding very nice over the drums. Our Guitarist uses an epiphone Les Paul and a solid state 30watt Line6 amp which was holding pretty well but a 50watt would proboly be a safe bet if ya dont wanna blow the speakers. If you play a decent place live yu can always mic up the amps as well.

RobinTrower12
04-30-2008, 10:15 PM
I've done some small gigs with my Roland Cube 60, and i've had to put it up to 1/2 volume and its been loud enough to be heard over my really damn loud drummer. For bass, you'll need at least 100 watts, especially for gigs.

CurbstompBass
04-30-2008, 10:36 PM
The bass is going to need alot more watts than you'd think. About 4 times the amount of the guitarist to have equivalent volume and not distort. You may be able to get by with 100 watts for really small gigs and a light-handed drummer, but you'll want 200+ for anything else.

chikin pickle
04-30-2008, 11:04 PM
It really depends on room size, types of speakers you have in your amps, how hard your drummer plays etc. I've played with a drummer using a 20 watt roland amp and could hear myself fine. But I would suggest aroung 75-120 solid state if you want to keep your clean channel clean, either 2x12 combo or halfstack. Anything over a halfstack is sonic overkill.

And to blowing speakers guy, if you have good speakers with the correct power rating they shouldn't blow.

BluMetalPlayer
05-01-2008, 10:37 PM
i have a 50 watt tube amp. When i play at a show in a room about the size of a gymnasium, i turn it up to about 4. VERY LOUD AMP! also great tone. tube amps are the way to go. My drummer also plays extremely loud and i usually only need 3 but for solos my solo button is set to 4

Archeo Avis
05-01-2008, 11:11 PM
Wattage does not measure volume. More important is the skill of your drummer (that is to say, how many ways he can hit the drums besides "really ****ing hard")

bangoodcharlote
05-01-2008, 11:28 PM
Wattage does not measure volume. More important is the skill of your drummer (that is to say, how many ways he can hit the drums besides "really ****ing hard") Are you saying that a 10-watt amp cranked up to 10 is could be as loud as a 100-watt amp cranked up to 10 (exaggerated for dramatic effect)?

Archeo Avis
05-01-2008, 11:31 PM
Are you saying that a 10-watt amp cranked up to 10 is could be as loud as a 100-watt amp cranked up to 10 (exaggerated for dramatic effect)?

Every other thing being completely equal, it will have a small effect. In reality, where different amps are made differently, it is not a measure of volume in any meaningful way.

bangoodcharlote
05-01-2008, 11:33 PM
I'll be very frank; I don't believe you.

Gurgle!Argh!
05-02-2008, 12:50 PM
hey guys, can you tell me how long a piece of string is?

Archeo Avis
05-02-2008, 03:08 PM
I'll be very frank; I don't believe you.

All other things being equal, you would have to increase the wattage ten fold to achieve a two fold increase in volume.

thedefrockednun
05-02-2008, 03:46 PM
hey guys, can you tell me how long a piece of string is?

kinda radom dont you think????

but it depends u talkin bout Guitar strings of strings for knitting (sarcasm)?

Gurgle!Argh!
05-03-2008, 04:39 PM
^...

...

...

Unforgotten
05-03-2008, 07:20 PM
it depends on your drummer, your amp and your style but i would say 50watt for solidstate and a bit lower for tube

KRSplat
05-04-2008, 12:24 AM
All other things being equal, you would have to increase the wattage ten fold to achieve a two fold increase in volume.
I get your point, but a two-fold increase in volume is actually pretty significant.

ilovemySG
05-04-2008, 12:31 AM
idk, IMO if your tone is set right you can cut through at a relatively low volume. agree>?

fromrehab
05-04-2008, 04:41 AM
i have the same problem, my drummer beats the **** out of his kit, it like a compitishion to see who is louder...... :wtf

thedefrockednun
05-04-2008, 11:30 AM
i have the same problem, my drummer beats the **** out of his kit, it like a compitishion to see who is louder...... :wtf


heres a solutionP buy a great amp like 250 watts and put 6 microphones next to the amp and link each to a pa system and THEN u put full volume, ur drummer wud loose that competition i think lol.

hunter33
05-06-2008, 10:39 AM
I use a 60 watt SS combo amp with a 12" speaker, and it easily gets over the drummer with plenty of spare headroom.

I used to use a 15 watt SS amp with an 8" speaker and it was just not strong enough, had no choice at the time but to mic it to the PA. I also have a 15 watt tube amp with a 10" speaker. It's marginally strong enough to get over a drummer but has to be cranked. I generally use the 60 watt SS amp because it easily has the power and has the tones I need.

Not just tube or SS wattage, but also speaker size (air displacement) makes a difference and so do ur mids settings. A smaller speaker(s) and/or scooped mids will make the amp sound not as loud.

willieturnip
11-23-2008, 08:20 PM
hey guys, can you tell me how long a piece of string is?


Haha, exactly.

musiclover_92
11-23-2008, 11:42 PM
I have a Fender 30 and a fender 15...the 15 can be heard over the jazz drummer on the rock-ish songs ( and he is a basher). The 30 hasn't been used with a drummer yet but I am confident it will work. SS both of them, saw a nice 65 Fender Reverb at GC I would steal.

solid_moose
11-25-2008, 04:37 AM
Bass 150+, but really bass is best DI'ed.

axemanchris
11-25-2008, 08:54 AM
I used to play (back in the day) a 10W Peavey Decade (SS), and I could get it up over a drum kit. I had it dimed, but it did the trick. We played a big outdoor show, and miked up through the PA, you'd never have known it was a little 10W practice amp!

CT

Lurcher
11-25-2008, 09:22 AM
I used to have a SS 60w head on a standard 4 x 12 and was completely swamped by my mate who used an AC30. Difference? I has a strat and he had a Les Paul. Over a drummer like my Animal, my 50w SS Fender with an SG was okay for practice or small gigs. Big jobs I slaved to a 150w valve head and 800w cab. ALWAYS have plenty to spare with the speakers and use double the amp rating you think if the guitar is weedy. Remember, you can turn down but a drummer loses style if he hits lighter than he's used to.

Brian

Samzawadi
11-25-2008, 10:14 AM
Solid state - as much wattage as possible, really, because you'll want to run it as low a volume as you can to avoid the signal degrading.

Bass should be at the absolute minimum double the largest guitar amp, and preferably treble. I've done a show with a 65w bass amp against a 30w guitar, and it worked, but the bass was definitely cranked and the guitar was nowhere near. It was a very small venue, too, and I can't imagine it having gone well if we were trying to be heard more than 20 feet away.

Arbitror
11-25-2008, 11:15 AM
People often underestimate the amount of wattage that us bass guys really need. 150 watts is chump change for us.

H4T3BR33D3R
11-25-2008, 03:30 PM
When I had my Hot Rod Deluxe (Which is about 40 watts give or take), I had no problem being heard without cranking it.


It's all about how you EQ your amp. If you scoop your mids a tone, you won't cut through.

M.P.A.Guitarist
11-25-2008, 10:02 PM
50w would do fine

freshtunes
11-25-2008, 10:25 PM
Solid state 75 watts is preffered. Tube 50.

Thrash_Head1990
12-12-2009, 09:17 AM
Will a 25watt be close to as loud as a 30 and is it loud enough for band practice

Phil Starr
12-12-2009, 01:04 PM
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/gear_maintenance/making_it_loud.html

hope this is useful

ChrisMill5
12-12-2009, 02:34 PM
I play a 250 solid state bass amp and it has to be turned up at least halfway to match the drummer.

Souls United
12-12-2009, 10:59 PM
My 75 watt solid state fails pretty badly in my current band situation. I'm looking to upgrade to a 55 watt tube amp. Back before the other members got their new amps though it was good.

Of course, I'm competing with a 1200 watt bass amp, drums, and a 60 watt tube amp. Plus a pretty loud PA.

concealer
12-15-2009, 10:05 PM
i play a full stack... and i cant hear me. You should just get a full stack.... or two

JR2204
12-16-2009, 12:55 AM
me and a friend are sort of doing a really small gig (no drummer) and this place is a hall that sits about 200 people, will a 15watt and 10watt amp do it!?

200 people is a really small gig for you? Damn.