is there an audience for blues today?


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skydogzoso1986
04-21-2006, 10:01 AM
i was wondering, my band is playing blues/rock and we like to do lots of blues jams etc. do you think many young people will come to see us, even if we play blues? in modern rock not many solos are played and people not really care about it anymore imo. what do you think? i'm sticking to the music, so that's not the problem, i just want to know if people would care

crazynickman
04-21-2006, 10:13 AM
im a huge fan of blues rock and im 16- i also play in that style most often, so imo there definitely is an audience.

Slurgi
04-21-2006, 10:22 AM
Here where I am in Iowa I think if you played straight blues you'd hear crickets chirping between sets.

:(

gpb0216
04-21-2006, 10:23 AM
i was wondering, my band is playing blues/rock and we like to do lots of blues jams etc.Blues/rock is great, blues jams are great, but lots of blues jams can get tedious unless you're on the SRV / Jimi Hendrix level. Just respect your listeners' tolerance for jamming and you'll be fine.
do you think many young people will come to see us, even if we play blues?I think this depends on your band's projection and skill.
in modern rock not many solos are played and people not really care about it anymore imo. what do you think? i'm sticking to the music, so that's not the problem, i just want to know if people would carePeople almost always welcome a beautifully appropriate guitar solo, played with discretion and skill. Respect your audience's ears and attention span and they'll come back to hear you again and again.

SinisterLefty
04-21-2006, 10:45 AM
Definately an audience for blues still out there. I'm a big blues fan and love listening to many styles of the genre. I've been stepping in with a band that does a lot of blues/rock and it pulls some nice crowds. As far as age I have seen people from 16 to 50 show up, so it's a big age gap too(thats a plus). Do not look at it as "will people care?", if you play it well and put feeling into your music, and interact with the crowd, you will make them care. Remember that the only way for something to remain popular to the masses it has to continue to be heard, so just by playing that style you are keeping it alive for new people to hear and appreciate.

skydogzoso1986
04-21-2006, 11:24 AM
okay thanks for the info. i wasn't going to stop playing blues/rock because i don't really care what people think, i just want to make good music that suits me and want to gig a lot, that's whatfor i want there to be a nice audience ofcourse. our style will be like hendrix/cream/allman bros so there will be a lot emotion in the songs. i also want to try something new and not do the regular things, but i hope people will like it. thanks again!

Kaiguy
04-21-2006, 01:10 PM
People thought blues was dead in the 80's - then Stevie ray Vaughn came along (even though I think he's boring). I think straight blues gets old fast unless the band is very inventive, but Blues influenced hard rock like Zeppelin is still going strong.

P.S. As an aspiring bottle-necker, blues is kinda my only hope :)

MiniMusicMasta
04-21-2006, 01:25 PM
If you play exciting, steady paced blues then many people would come and see you but if all you did was like slower relaxed stuff then maybe not so many.

Just my opinion.

skydogzoso1986
04-21-2006, 01:42 PM
okay thanks, the aim is at playing fast blues so then there shouldn't be a problem i think. kaiguy, one question, do you play in standard tuning or what tuning do you use for bottleneck? i've been trying to get into it but it's very hard. i heard rory gallagher always uses standard tuning, which sounds amazing i think. but G tuning should do good to, not?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAIlnxfBpnw&search=rory%20gallagher => this one is played in standard tuning too i think, pretty amazing guitar player :)

crazynickman
04-21-2006, 04:48 PM
i think by Straight blues you all mean Delta blues, as opposed to electric Chicago blues, right? i dont see any problem with delta except that your audience will get bored if they dont like it, but knowing your roots is important. by the way im much more a fan of blues-hard rock like Cream than Howling Wolf or Robert Johnson, even though they both rock ass (yea thats right i said rock ass. problem?)

splice
04-21-2006, 05:51 PM
depends where your from.....i dk much about where yall live but im from ms and theres blues all around

Dog Eat Dog
04-21-2006, 07:43 PM
okay thanks, the aim is at playing fast blues so then there shouldn't be a problem i think. kaiguy, one question, do you play in standard tuning or what tuning do you use for bottleneck? i've been trying to get into it but it's very hard. i heard rory gallagher always uses standard tuning, which sounds amazing i think. but G tuning should do good to, not?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAIlnxfBpnw&search=rory%20gallagher => this one is played in standard tuning too i think, pretty amazing guitar player :)


Open G is fine for playing bottleneck, I use that open D, and Open E for slide but open G is the best, easy to play and easy to tune to. But thats just me i dont know what Kaigui does.

John Swift
04-21-2006, 08:10 PM
i was wondering, my band is playing blues/rock and we like to do lots of blues jams etc. do you think many young people will come to see us, even if we play blues? in modern rock not many solos are played and people not really care about it anymore imo. what do you think? i'm sticking to the music, so that's not the problem, i just want to know if people would care

There's an audience for more or less any kind of music; its just that the size of the audience varies with the type of music, I play in two contrasting styles of Blues bands one is Rock/Blues and the other is more Delta/Chicago Blues, of the two the Rock/Blues definately has more outlets/venues, learn to read your audience and use common sense regarding material, play to the audience and the venue instead of being self indulgent.

coralfankevin
04-22-2006, 05:22 AM
My last band was blues rock and we got to know a few othe bands in the area who also played it. My band would play every couple of months with about three other bands and pull in about 100 hundred people with no real advertising, so there are definitely still audiences out there

John Swift
04-22-2006, 05:35 AM
My last band was blues rock and we got to know a few othe bands in the area who also played it. My band would play every couple of months with about three other bands and pull in about 100 hundred people with no real advertising, so there are definitely still audiences out there
Hi Kevin what happened to you did you drop out? long time no hear.

coralfankevin
04-22-2006, 05:41 AM
Hi John, sorry for not getting back to your email a while back but because of limited internet access I didn't see it until about a month after you sent it. I'm still at Uni and I've got about 7000 words of essays to do in the next week and a half, which will be interesting. I left my bluesy band a while back because the singer had turned into an arse, so now I'm in an indie band which I'm gradually persuading to be more riffy :)

rockminister
04-23-2006, 12:16 AM
Daddy Rich is cool! He draws good crowds. Park Place Entertainment books him sweet gigs!

CheckOutSerafin
04-23-2006, 11:59 AM
im a huge fan of blues rock and im 16- i also play in that style most often, so imo there definitely is an audience.
Yeah, I'm basically the same. What kind of blues exactly are you thinking of playing?

psychodelia
04-23-2006, 01:16 PM
There is one thing I would advise for jamming: know your limits. Most of us are not at the Duane Allman level where we can solo for a half hour and keep people interested.

If you find that you aren't interested in what you are playing, the audience isn't either. In an emergency, where you find you're just mindlessly noodling, keep a couple of your better licks in reserve so you can pull out of the solo on a high note. My teachers have always told me to leave to audience wanting more, not less. If you leave an audience wanting you to play more solos, you're in business.

~~cemetary~~
04-23-2006, 04:59 PM
around where my dad lives, everyone seems to love the blues

crazynickman
04-24-2006, 07:51 PM
Yeah, I'm basically the same. What kind of blues exactly are you thinking of playing?
heavy Cream/ Led Zeppelin/ HEndrix (Crossroads, When The Levee Breaks, Voodoo Child, etc) influences but i also love the Who so very varied-I only listen to classic rock so a lot of the blues-rock guys from then. I'm trying bottleneck but i hate retunining my guitar all the time :p: and i stick to regular 12-bar, sometimes a bit of Canned Heat/ Ten Years After boogie (like I'm Going Home) but for the most part hard rock with obvious blues roots...::gasps for air::
you?

skydogzoso1986
04-26-2006, 03:36 AM
heavy Cream/ Led Zeppelin/ HEndrix (Crossroads, When The Levee Breaks, Voodoo Child, etc) influences but i also love the Who so very varied-I only listen to classic rock so a lot of the blues-rock guys from then. I'm trying bottleneck but i hate retunining my guitar all the time :p: and i stick to regular 12-bar, sometimes a bit of Canned Heat/ Ten Years After boogie (like I'm Going Home) but for the most part hard rock with obvious blues roots...::gasps for air::
you?

hey man, that's in the exactly same direction i want to go, but can't. just curious, what's your band line up? and do you make your own songs?

John Swift
04-26-2006, 06:24 AM
One of the problems with naming a particular genre of music is that what one person calls Blues another calls Rock.
Hendrix in most peoples eyes is more likely to be called Rock ie Puple Haze/Hey Joe, All Along The Watchtower was written By Dylan you would hardly call that folk although Redhouse is Old Style Blues, Led Zeppelin were really Progressive Rock, Cream were more Jazz orientated, the Who were really a mid 60s Rock Band their record company/management aligned them to the Mod Movement for publicity purposes.
This is a problem when people run out of names, styles suddenly develope family trees,exactly the same thing has happened with Country Music, some misguided people actualy called Shania Twain's "Man I Feel Like A Woman" a country song, that's as silly as calling The Who's My Generation a blues song.

crazynickman
04-26-2006, 06:29 PM
hey man, that's in the exactly same direction i want to go, but can't. just curious, what's your band line up? and do you make your own songs?
im not in a band anymore but my last band was all "emo" so i got out of there quick; they were my friends but they didnt know good music

One of the problems with naming a particular genre of music is that what one person calls Blues another calls Rock.
Hendrix in most peoples eyes is more likely to be called Rock ie Puple Haze/Hey Joe, All Along The Watchtower was written By Dylan you would hardly call that folk although Redhouse is Old Style Blues, Led Zeppelin were really Progressive Rock, Cream were more Jazz orientated, the Who were really a mid 60s Rock Band their record company/management aligned them to the Mod Movement for publicity purposes.
This is a problem when people run out of names, styles suddenly develope family trees,exactly the same thing has happened with Country Music, some misguided people actualy called Shania Twain's "Man I Feel Like A Woman" a country song, that's as silly as calling The Who's My Generation a blues song.
when i named all those songs and bands i was giving a general idea of my personal sound; crossroads is a huge influence on what i play etc. and yes i know about genre confusion, there never was so many genres until around the 80s when each separate band was branded with its own genre.

daddyrich
05-29-2006, 11:09 AM
Daddy Rich is cool! He draws good crowds. Park Place Entertainment books him sweet gigs!

Umm, no. I have always booked all of my own shows. Park Place is a bunch or either crooks, or dumbasses or a combination of the 2. Don't use them. They never got me a single gig. I had to pay them $200 ( which i scammed back out of them)

So yeah, hello to everyone. please check out my tunes.

http://www.daddyrich.net

or For the best priced audio mastering:

http://www.loudcds.com

Thanks
-Rich :(

Vin2254
05-29-2006, 02:35 PM
I dont know, but theres an audiance for good music. If thats what your playin you should be alright.

John Swift
05-29-2006, 04:28 PM
I play in two Blues bands, the main one gets upwards of six gigs a month; so yes there is a market for blues bands but you've got to be good, we're doing the 'Colne R&B Festival' this year.

SomeEvilDude
05-29-2006, 06:12 PM
I dont know, but theres an audiance for good music. If thats what your playin you should be alright.

I concur. There's a direct audience for every genre, and there'll be people who don't like it, people who do and people who are indifferent.

But they key thing is, as I've said in many other posts, is that as long as you play good, entertaining music and put on a decent show, chances are that people will be at least be interested.

Mattalac
06-02-2006, 08:16 AM
im a huge fan of blues rock and im 16- i also play in that style most often, so imo there definitely is an audience.

Same, but I wouldn't go to a gig, reason being, I go to have fun and rock out mostly, even if I don't liek the music. But if you were good, i'd definately buy your music.