Your Blues Playing Techniques


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Stinging_Acid
05-28-2006, 07:39 PM
Besides using the pentatonic scales, and the 12 bar blues, what else do you guys incorporate into your playing when you're jamming out the blues? And what do you think is particularly your style: slide, vibrato, etc.

hendrixcrazyfan
05-28-2006, 07:52 PM
when i play the blues, which is mostly what play, i dont ever think about what im doing. blues is the most soulful music ever created, and it HAS to come from the heart and not from the head, or else it sounds like total ****. when i play i clear my mind and just let it flow out as it comes. if you stop to pay attention to what you doing. it comes out too technical. so study your heros, and try no to think too much, and it usually just happens on its own

Jackolas
05-29-2006, 02:01 PM
when i play the blues, which is mostly what play, i dont ever think about what im doing. blues is the most soulful music ever created, and it HAS to come from the heart and not from the head, or else it sounds like total ****. when i play i clear my mind and just let it flow out as it comes. if you stop to pay attention to what you doing. it comes out too technical. so study your heros, and try no to think too much, and it usually just happens on its own

Holy crap, thats true. I was playing yesterday with my amp for the first time in a while over some backing tracks and it all just flew out of me. I hadn't played like that in a while it feels like sometimes.

^

Thats worded really weird but you know what I mean.

fenderfreak101
05-29-2006, 02:34 PM
See, for me, playing blues has nothing to do with technique. It's all about just flowing and jamming, and not worrying about how it's gonna sound. If you concentrate on what you're doing, then its not genuine, and it sounds forced.

I can't remember who said that "Blues is easy to play, but hard to feel", but, whoever it was, I agree completely.

Stinging_Acid
05-29-2006, 04:17 PM
^I think that was B.B. King himself, I might be mistaken.
And I know exactly what you all mean, it just flows when it's really good.

The Master Plan
05-29-2006, 04:45 PM
I checked that up it's actuallay Jimi Hendrix.
For me its heavy slide sounding vibrato's and slow long bends.

~AdNy
05-29-2006, 05:20 PM
defiantely what was said above about playing from the heart, not from the hands or mind. some thigns i tend to do when playing, is try to mimic a lot of slide stuff, without a slide. it tends to sounds really great: such as huge vibratos, 12-fret slides, quick riffs with spaces in between. long bends are of course an essential. and of course full use of my army of licks :D

Dan Steinman
06-04-2006, 08:20 AM
and of course full use of my army of licks :D
hey, it does help to have some legit chops and an army of licks. ideally, you can come up with some licks in the moment, but sometimes you do have to use your head to get a new lick together. this doesn't mean it'll be any less heartfelt when you play it again, in fact it'll sound better because you paid attention to it and put some time into perfecting it.

dblacker
06-04-2006, 01:28 PM
There are players at all levels of technical complexity who play with a great deal of feeling and soul. Every great player has put some serious and focused time in on their instrument. Whether it's a guy like Albert King, who uses just a few notes to convey the feeling, or somone like Brian Setzer who's seriously studied the styles of Blues, Swing, Bebop, Rockabilly, etc. it doesn't really matter. The more important thing is to uncover your own style and voice, and know what your ear wants to hear. What will set you apart as a player is uncovering your own style. The tradition of blues / jazz improvisation has been one of licks, phrases and musical ideas that have been handed down from one generation to the next. Every great player from Louis Armstrong to Stevie Ray Vaughn has incorporated the styles, phrases and ideas of past generations into their playing to express what they are trying to say. So it does help to put some focus into your playing and try to find influences that reflect what you want to say. Here are some downloadable online lessons that cover many different styles of blues playing and may be of interest.

David Blacker's blues guitar lesson's from truefire.com (link below)

http://truefire.com/list.html?store=audio_lessons&viewauthor=3669