Single Pick Up Guitars


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L3x
12-04-2006, 03:06 AM
Hey guys what's up,

I've got a quick question for you guitar guru's. The other day I was trying out some guitars at my local shop, I picked up a Jackson Signature Series Guitar of Christian Olde and noticed it only had 1 EMG 81 pick up in it. It was the first time I've ever tried to play with such a guitar. I plugged it into a JCM900 and man did this thing sound heavy. To my surprise it sounded awesome with a thick metal sound that I've always wanted. Afterwards, I tried another Jackson Dinky with 2 EMG's in em, not sure if it was 81/60 or whatever, but it didn't have the same sound.

My question is, what are the advantages and disadvantages of single pick up guitars? What's the sound different? And I'm still really puzzled to why a single pick up guitar sounded so much better then the other Dinky I tried which had 2 EMG's.

Thanks in advance,

Cheers

breadfan82
12-04-2006, 03:15 AM
I think any guitar with only one pickup is very confining. The sounds and tones won't be as versatile as aguitar with two or more pickups. It all boils down to personal preference, but I prefer two humbuckers as opposed to one, just for versatility.

Y00p
12-04-2006, 03:16 AM
It doesn't really make any difference to sound. Except that you miss the versatility of the neck pickup and the possibility to actively change between them, but that's it, really.

And what Dinky was it? Cause I'm thinking it might've been EMG Hz's; the non-active, less-heavy EMG's. AFAIK a lot of the 'cheaper' Dinky's have been fitted with these.

High_o
12-04-2006, 03:17 AM
i dont know any advantages, but there mostly in signature guits cos this means that people feel that it has been customised to the artist's specs, and would more willingly fork out for it. This means the guiatar is way less versatile. The difference in sound is due to the placement (bridge, neck, mid) which is the same as using a pickup selector

teamzaius
12-04-2006, 03:20 AM
There is no real difference. The type of pickup and where it is placed determines what kind of sound you get. I suppose that the wood taken out to route a second or third pickup into a guitar may take away some of the "heavy" sound but I doubt it. Chances are the Olde guitar sounded heavier because it is made of mahogony whereas the Dinky is made of Alder. As far as single pickup ads/disads, the only one I can really see is that with one pickup you get a less versatile sound.

yeahyeah
12-04-2006, 04:04 AM
Supposedly the lack of another magnet choking the strings' vibrations makes harmonics on single pickup guitars more clear than on guitars with more than one pickup. But I couldn't really tell the difference between an esquire and a tele on the bridge pickup. Single pickup guitars look really cool though

locolive
03-31-2009, 06:47 PM
Hi guys, can anyone tell me is there some pedal or simulator,or...., anything else that could make my single bridge pickup fat 50 (from fender mastrbuilt) sound like humbucker. I tryed boosters and line drivers but its not the same.i need more drive. Pleae help me.
Nikola

JELIFISH19
03-31-2009, 06:54 PM
It's a better signal. The more wiring a guitar has, the more signal loss there is. It's also the reason why companies like Caparison choose to have only one volume control on guitars sometimes. It could be a matter of lacking a tone control instead of the missing pickups. I'm not sure. It's probably both though.

6 STRING NOOB
03-31-2009, 06:57 PM
single pickup guitars are maide for playing lead and soloing. and most are considered "metal" guitars cuz u rarely use the nmeck pickup anyways in metal. because you want that chunky sound.

i have 2 i like them both. the edwards and jackson. good guitars, not for rythm playing though

CLIFF_BURTON
03-31-2009, 06:59 PM
Supposedly the lack of another magnet choking the strings' vibrations makes harmonics on single pickup guitars more clear than on guitars with more than one pickup. But I couldn't really tell the difference between an esquire and a tele on the bridge pickup. Single pickup guitars look really cool though

The magnets have no effect on the strings.

CaptDin
03-31-2009, 07:04 PM
I like single-pickup guitars, but I am sort of a metal guy, and I rarely use the neck pickup anyway. Plus, the less crap in your guitar, the less there is to go wrong.

zephyrclaw
06-16-2009, 07:03 AM
Wouldn't the simplest explanation be because an expensive signature model is of course generally more superior in quality than a bottom-of-the-line one? It's pretty reasonable to expect a Dinky to sound worse than a signature model, considering the massive price difference.

dorfmeister
11-25-2009, 12:10 PM
My question is, what are the advantages and disadvantages of single pick up guitars?

I think the biggest advantage is simplicity. You have to really listen and find a way to adjust your playing to make it work with the more limited palette you've got from that one basic sound you've got with that one pickup. Also gets you to maybe adjust the volume on your guitar to get subtle variations in the sound of that one pickup.

Kurapica
11-25-2009, 02:08 PM
The main difference is the signal path. Some guitars with one pup run straight from the pup, into the volume and out. You get a very pure sound this way and you will find that the volume knob is suddenly a whole lot more useful. It has a dramatic affect on the tone and you won't really find yourself struggling with a "missing pickup" like you might think you would.

Needless to say, I'm an Esquire, Melody Maker, LP Jr and SG Jr kind of guy :cheers:

Rock Pig
11-25-2009, 02:25 PM
single pickup guitars are maide for playing lead and soloing. and most are considered "metal" guitars cuz u rarely use the nmeck pickup anyways in metal. because you want that chunky sound.

i have 2 i like them both. the edwards and jackson. good guitars, not for rythm playing though
They are not by any means made for lead and soloing - the point of a single pickup guitar is that some players (such as Eddie Van Halen and, apparently, Christian Olbe Wonders) don't use it very often and so there's no need for the minor signal degradation and slight harmonic choking that the extra wiring and extra magnets cause respectively.
In metal however the neck pickup is a very commonly used pickup for lead guitar due to its smooth, flattering tone.
There is no reason a single bridge pickup guitar isn't good for rhythm playing - in fact, I very seldom hear of heavy metal rhythms played on the neck pickup because, under the levels of gain used, chords don't sound as open and chugging loses clarity.
I have to say that I respectfully disagree with pretty much every point you made there.

azn_guitarist25
11-25-2009, 07:48 PM
They are not by any means made for lead and soloing - the point of a single pickup guitar is that some players (such as Eddie Van Halen and, apparently, Christian Olbe Wonders) don't use it very often and so there's no need for the minor signal degradation and slight harmonic choking that the extra wiring and extra magnets cause respectively.
In metal however the neck pickup is a very commonly used pickup for lead guitar due to its smooth, flattering tone.
There is no reason a single bridge pickup guitar isn't good for rhythm playing - in fact, I very seldom hear of heavy metal rhythms played on the neck pickup because, under the levels of gain used, chords don't sound as open and chugging loses clarity.
I have to say that I respectfully disagree with pretty much every point you made there.

Lol that's alright the kid lies (doesn't own the edwards or jackson or a custom shop esp like he said he does) so you can obviously take anything he says with a grain of salt.