simplest way to paint a guitar.


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The Iron Man
12-26-2006, 01:34 AM
Is the simplest way to paint a guitar to spray paint it, then apply about 3 coats of clear and thats it?

Dostoevsky
12-26-2006, 01:38 AM
no, not even close. you need to use a special type of spray called 'nitro cellulose'. regular spray paint will, truth be told, look like shite no matter how much work you put in

you can get some nitro at StewMac or Warmoth for fairly cheap

guitarist5150
12-26-2006, 01:42 AM
car paint

dave293
12-26-2006, 01:43 AM
http://www.reranch.com/basics.htm

The Iron Man
12-26-2006, 01:43 AM
no, not even close. you need to use a special type of spray called 'nitro cellulose'. regular spray paint will, truth be told, look like shite no matter how much work you put in

you can get some nitro at StewMac or Warmoth for fairly cheap
nitro cellulose is just laquer as I see on stewmac. I need a colour.

Edwardthegreat5
12-26-2006, 01:46 AM
no, not even close. you need to use a special type of spray called 'nitro cellulose'. regular spray paint will, truth be told, look like shite no matter how much work you put in

you can get some nitro at StewMac or Warmoth for fairly cheap
Regular DupliColor spray will work quite nicely, actually. And nitrocellulose isn't what you need to use a clear, you can use polyurethane if you want it to age better.


And three coats of clear wont even begin to make guitar look good, you're gonna need a lot of Coats, somewhere around 20. Just read the tutorial on reranch.

And dont forget about sanding first.

kaplac
12-26-2006, 01:48 AM
Jesus.

duplicolor car paints will work perfectly fine.

And dostoevsky, nitro won't make it look any better if you dont' have a refined technique first.

Your jobs only look like shit becuase you dont' know how to paint properly. If you have good technique you will get perfectly good looking finishes with acrylic lacquer automotive sprays.

For a good tutorial on painting read the on on here. www.reranch.com

But keep in mind most people will screw up their first couple finishes, you have to learn from trial and error.

edit: Eddie, poly doens't "age" better. It doesn't yellow after ten years like nitro lacquers do. Actually I think polys start to yellow after like 50 years or something.

Edwardthegreat5
12-26-2006, 02:03 AM
Jesus.

duplicolor car paints will work perfectly fine.

And dostoevsky, nitro won't make it look any better if you dont' have a refined technique first.

Your jobs only look like shit becuase you dont' know how to paint properly. If you have good technique you will get perfectly good looking finishes with acrylic lacquer automotive sprays.

For a good tutorial on painting read the on on here. www.reranch.com

But keep in mind most people will screw up their first couple finishes, you have to learn from trial and error.

edit: Eddie, poly doens't "age" better. It doesn't yellow after ten years like nitro lacquers do. Actually I think polys start to yellow after like 50 years or something.
Exactly, is last longer, which is what I meant. :p:

kaplac
12-26-2006, 02:11 AM
oh ok

Then eddies right

:)

LuthierofTexas
12-26-2006, 02:21 AM
Eddies not right. The TS asked what the easiest way to get a paint job done, which is to take it and have someone do it. Thats the easiest way.

But as for the technicalities of painting and finishing guitars, Eddie is right. Byt the way, dont listen to Dostoevsky. Hes obviously a dumb f*ck.

Edwardthegreat5
12-26-2006, 02:23 AM
Eddies not right. The TS asked what the easiest way to get a paint job done, which is to take it and have someone do it. Thats the easiest way.

But as for the technicalities of painting and finishing guitars, Eddie is right. Byt the way, dont listen to Dostoevsky. Hes obviously a dumb f*ck.
:(

Damn you.

ZootCst
12-26-2006, 03:00 AM
Eddies not right. The TS asked what the easiest way to get a paint job done, which is to take it and have someone do it. Thats the easiest way. :D

The easiest way would actually be to just leave it like it is, or maybe throw some stickers on it.

I've done a few cheapo spraypaint finishes that actually looked pretty good, but I do have quite a bit of painting experience.

dave293 recommended http://www.reranch.com/basics.htm for some refin advice. That's a great site, check it out.

Tyrssen
02-29-2012, 12:59 PM
Wow -- lots of strongly-held opinions, here, a few obviously coming from experience. Allow me to add my two cents worth.

Basically, you're right; ya spray it, then clear coat it. That said, "it's all in the prep work." Sand off the gloss of an existing finish, or take it down to about #320 grit on bare wood. Then spray several coats of gray primer (it builds up nicely) and wet-sand it with #400 grit sandpaper. This should be done with your sanding paper on a block of wood or a proper rubber sanding block from the local auto parts shop, at least on front and back, to achieve a truly flat finish. The rest, you'll have to do carefully by hand, without a block.

Now you're ready to spray your color; but the man's right, technique is everything. Assuming one is using spray cans from KMart or similar, if you've never painted anything before, PRACTICE on some scrap ... wood, metal, anything! "Technique" in this case simply means keeping the spray pattern even, level, and the same distance from the surface that's getting painted. Overlap each "stroke" by 1/3 to 1/2. When you can achieve a nice, even finish, do it on your actual work piece.

Who in blazes would bother with nitro or any other form of lacquer, in this day and age? Basic automotive polyurethane enamels work great, are easy to use, dry quickly, and give excellent results. This is basically what you'll find in a spray can. And I'll tell the nay-sayers right now, no I'm NOT full of shit, I've spent several decades painting cars, vans, motorcycles, and yes, even a few guitars.

Okay, what this means is, you have an incredibly wide variety of finishes to choose from! Straight color, metalflake, metallics, and a bunch of "special effect" finishes are all available in spray cans. Be sure to lay on a little "extra," because your next step is more sanding. When dry (a couple hours, but give it a day just for safety's sake) wet-sand CAREFULLY with #400 grit (yeah I know, some folks go as nuts as #1200 or so, but it just ain't necessary.) #400 will give enough "surface" for your clear coat to hang on to. When done with the wet-sanding, now shoot clear ... same technique, be careful so it doesn't run. Runs can be fixed but it's a bitch.

When the clear is dry, it might look perfect as-is, or you have the option of compounding for a super-shiny finish. If you choose to go that route, once again, automotive products come to the rescue. Any auto parts store will have some form of rub-out compound; get some "coarse" and some "fine," rub the bejeebers out of it (without going through your clear or finish coats) and you're done.

As a confidence-builder, just to prove that YOU can do this, see the wide variety of videos on YouTube. You'll see a lot of different methods, and probably pick up some interesting tips, as well.

poppameth
02-29-2012, 01:48 PM
Anything solvent based is going to yellow. Poly is no exception. I work in a paint and flooring store and we use poly all the time. The thing about the products is their sensitivity to sunlight. UV keeps them from yellowing as fast. So leave your guitar in a stand and it won't yellow as quickly. Keep it in a case all the time and it will yellow much faster. If you want to avoid yellowing you use waterborne products.

Roc8995
02-29-2012, 02:48 PM
This thread is five years old. I'm guessing he's figured it out by now. :bonk: