Lead guitar theory


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New Guitarist
04-07-2007, 07:42 AM
i want to be a good lead guitarist what are the things i would practice??
(step by step pls...)

Mky
04-07-2007, 07:57 AM
Scales

∆nimus Prime
04-07-2007, 08:13 AM
Alternate picking

bigmanwithanaxe
04-07-2007, 12:00 PM
Practicing technique and learning music theory is the way to go.

FenderJTx
04-07-2007, 12:57 PM
i want to be a good lead guitarist what are the things i would practice??
(step by step pls...)
I wouldn't say that I'm exactly a good lead guitarist myself but here are some tips.

-Keeping rhythm
-Technique
-Dynamics
-Understanding the notes in scales
-Improvisation (and understanding what notes to hit and when to hit them)

alfie98
04-07-2007, 02:09 PM
Scales are the most important.

KIDRoach
04-07-2007, 08:39 PM
Music theory, and that is a lot of stuffs.

Scales
Modes
Ear Training
Alt Picking
Sweep Picking

And the list can go on.

leo_17ec
04-08-2007, 12:13 AM
Hello there, got 3 yrs playing guitar, always as a lead, last 2 I focused on Yngwieīs style, I already made a cover of his song Far beyond the sun, actually I got the speed to play it, but could anyone tell me what I precisely need to improvise and what kind of scales do I need in metal, also would be good I someone tell me how to play them when improvising

Page&HammettFan
04-08-2007, 02:04 AM
i want to be a good lead guitarist what are the things i would practice??
(step by step pls...)
You want to know how to play some scales... Theory is a very useful thing.

Improvising has always been an improtant tool for lead players, I think, but isn't completely a necessary skill. But if you wanna be a really good lead guitarist, I'd advise learning to do it. It's really easy though ;) It may take a while getting good at it, though, so don't be discouraged if you think your solos suck at first. I know mine sure did.... But I've been improvising for a while now, and can honestly say, I practice so much that I see an improvement each month in my ability to do it. A lot can be learned from playing other peoples' music, though, in the style that you want to play. You can then bring those licks over into your solos.

You should practice alternate picking. That's a useful skill. I personally don't do it, though. I do a similar picking style called Economy Picking. There's a lesson on it on this site. I advise reading both, and practicing both, and see which you prefer.

bluesrocker101
04-08-2007, 12:18 PM
1. Know you notes and intervals.
2. Get into the basic scales, modes and chords formulas.
3. Learn the chord/scale relationships of those modes
4. Learn the 2 other minor scales (Harm. Minor and Mel. Minor) and their modes
5. Chord/scale relationships with the new modes.
6. Look at the Diminished scales and whole tone scale and learn the chord/scale relationships.

Well, I could go on forever about theory. But when you're a lead guitarist, never think that you don't have to worry about chords. Chords are extremely important when you're a lead guitarist. They tell you what modes, chord tones to land on, flavors and moods, etc... to deal with. know your chords and extensions.

Blind In 1 Ear
04-08-2007, 12:22 PM
learn how to follow chords.

edg
04-08-2007, 12:38 PM
Step:

1) Learn the 1st pentatonic "box" position at the 5th fret (that would be A minor pent).
2) Get an "A Blues" backing track (I happen to have one at http://edg.dmusic.com/music/ it is meant to be looped)
3) Practice improvising 1) over 2)

That would be about the easiest, virtually theory-free, way to get started.

Beyond that you should learn about scales and how the fretboard works, learn
the remaining 4 pentatonic positions and then learn maj and min arpeggios up
and down the neck. That should keep you busy a while.

EDIT: Oh by the way, at my site I also have an example solo over the same backing
track and it uses ONLY the pentatonic 1st box position.

LethalAe86TypeR
04-08-2007, 12:44 PM
Phrasing.

jamiedonnelly93
04-08-2007, 03:47 PM
Play whatever the fcuk you think fits. Kirk Hammet knew shit all about scales and modes when in Metallica, he played what he thought sounded good, of course theory is good and theory helps but like John Fruciante says its good to brake the rules. If you stick to scales then your playing will seem copied unless you shred your tits off but apart from that, make stuff up and have fun!