A Beginer's Guide Prog Rock


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Doodleface
04-08-2007, 07:26 PM
What is Prog? How Do I Identify Prog? and More Questions are Answered


What Is Prog?

this is a definition straight from www.progarchives.com

" Progressive rock ("prog") is an ambitious, eclectic, and often grandiose style of rock music which arose in the late 1960s principally in England, reaching the peak of its popularity in the early 1970s, but continuing as a musical form to this day. Progressive rock was largely a European movement, and drew most of its influences from classical music and jazz fusion, in contrast to American rock, which was influenced by rhythm & blues and country, although there are notable exceptions in the New World such as Kansas and Rush considered by many to be the finest examples of the form. Over the years various sub-genres of progressive rock have emerged, such as symphonic rock, art rock and progressive metal.

Progressive rock artists sought to move away from the limitations of radio formatted rock and pop, and "progress" rock to the point that it could achieve the sophistication of jazz or classical music. It is admired by its fans for its complexity, requiring a high level of musical virtuosity to perform. Critics have often derided the genre as pompous and self-indulgent. This is because, unlike such stylistically consistent genres as country or hip hop, progressive rock is difficult to define in a single conclusive way. Outspoken King Crimson leader Robert Fripp has voiced his disdain for the term. The major acts that defined the genre in the 1970s (Yes, Genesis, Emerson Lake and Palmer, Rush and King Crimson) do not sound alike. There is also debate on whether bands such as The Beatles, Phish, and Radiohead belong to the genre. "


Well, I'm guessing some (most?) of you didn't read all that, so I'll break it down for you.

Progressive Rock (prog)originated in England in the 60s and reached its peak of popularity in the early 70s but still continues to this day. It was infuenced by Classical and Jazz music, although over the years it has branched out quite a bit. Prog artists wanted to 'progress' rock to the point where it would be as highly regarded as classical or jazz.



Okay, now you know what prog is, I'll tell you some elements of Prog

-Often contains long pieces of music, that can run over 30 minutes long.
-Concept albums with incricate plots that can make CSI cower in fear.
-Synth and other electronic instrumentation
-Use of odd time signatures and 'weird' scales
-Songs divided into different parts (such as the 5 part Octavarium by Dream Theater)

note: these elements are not universal nor does a band need all of them to be considered 'prog'


As stated earlier, Prog branches out into different sound quite a bit, and their is no generic 'prog' sound, unlike Hardcore music for example. Different sub-genres of prog include: Symphonic Prog, Prog Metal, Space Prog, Folk Prog, Neo-Prog, and Krautrock.

Each has its differences and each is common due to the elements of prog.
Symphonic Prog for example, is heavily influenced by classical music and even contains classical pieces redone by the band and put into an original song.

Examples:

Symphonic Prog: Yes, Genesis, Emerson, Lake, and Palmer
Prog Metal: Dream Theater, Tool, Fates Warning
Space Prog: Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, Tangerine
Folk Prog: Jethro Tull, Gentle Giant, The Moody Blues
Neo-Prog: Marillion, IQ, Arena
Krautrock: Can, Neu!, Ash Ra Tempul

their are more sub-genres, but I'm much too lazy to do them all



My Recommondations:

looking to get interested in Prog, or want some awesome albums to add to your collection, here are my picks

Awake - Dream Theater
Scenes From a Memory - Dream Theater
Close to the Edge - Yes
Tales from Topographic Oceans - Yes
Thick as a Brick - Jethro Tull
2112 - Rush
The Wall - Pink Floyd
Dark Side of the Moon - Pink Floyd
Selling England by the Pound - Genesis
In the Court of the Crimson King - King Crimson
Red - King Crimson
Laterlus - Tool
Brain Salad Surgery - Emerson Lake and Palmer
Tarkus - Emerson Lake and Palmer
Garden of Dreams - The Flower Kings





All information was from www.progarchives.com

Son of a Brit
04-08-2007, 07:36 PM
You Forgot to recomend Dream Theater - Images And Words, and Octavarium

You also forgot to add Dragonforce to Prog Metal

Doodleface
04-08-2007, 07:41 PM
You Forgot to recomend Dream Theater - Images And Words, and Octavarium

You also forgot to add Dragonforce to Prog Metal

I consider Dragonforce to me more Power Metal, and either way, they are not heavyweights in Prog Metal

and I didn't put in Images and Words or Octavarium because theirs already 2 albums by DT, although they are sweet, If i put in all my favourite prog albums It'd more like

Yes - All Albums from 1972-1984
Genesis - All Albums before 1976

and stuff like that :p:

Doodleface
04-08-2007, 11:53 PM
so who approves/denies this?
and how do I know when it happens?

yawn
04-08-2007, 11:57 PM
Cool. I guess you can submit it when more people (and maybe a mod) give their approval as well.



But, after you submit it, just don't expect it to be approved anytime soon :o



*still waiting for the approval of my article from January*

Doodleface
04-09-2007, 12:31 AM
yeah.. I submitted it, and it said I could re-submit it, after It got approval here.

psychodelia
04-09-2007, 09:10 PM
It's rather thin. Most of the writing is a quote taken from a website, even though this is your article.

As far as the writing you have goes, there's five elements that might make a band "prog", a list of subgenres that aren't explained, and a list of your recommendations that aren't explained either.

So, you probably want suggestions on how to beef it up. The most straightforward way is for you to go through a history of prog rock. Present the music that paved the way for prog, and then go through some of the most important bands and movements.

Prog rock bands are very different in sound, and outlining at least some of these differences for the beginner is important. The differences between Jethro Tull, King Crimson, and Dream Theater are vast, but without some kind of guidance, a reader would only have the barest idea of why they are different.


An example of a good article explaining a genre is this one on Funk. http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/genres_battles/its_all_about_funk.html
Give it a read, and then consider beefing up your article a bit.

Doodleface
04-10-2007, 10:52 PM
It's rather thin. Most of the writing is a quote taken from a website, even though this is your article.

As far as the writing you have goes, there's five elements that might make a band "prog", a list of subgenres that aren't explained, and a list of your recommendations that aren't explained either.

So, you probably want suggestions on how to beef it up. The most straightforward way is for you to go through a history of prog rock. Present the music that paved the way for prog, and then go through some of the most important bands and movements.

Prog rock bands are very different in sound, and outlining at least some of these differences for the beginner is important. The differences between Jethro Tull, King Crimson, and Dream Theater are vast, but without some kind of guidance, a reader would only have the barest idea of why they are different.


An example of a good article explaining a genre is this one on Funk. http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/genres_battles/its_all_about_funk.html
Give it a read, and then consider beefing up your article a bit.

Thanks for the tips, I will do that, but not for a bit sadly, Its almost 11 and I need sleep, and I'm on vacation till Monday as of tommorow afternoon.