how much do gigs pay?


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gtrhero93
06-09-2007, 09:53 PM
how much does a small-venue gig usually pay?

ark
06-09-2007, 09:58 PM
next to nothing, really.

being a musician doesnt get good until youve earned it, and evenso, there are tons of bands and artists that deserve good pay, but they usually just make enough to make it to the next town, and thats gold.

the best way to make money is to market yourself by getting merchandise, cds, and stuff like that and sell it.

give it a few years and youll learn all about it on the road.

Zar938
06-09-2007, 09:59 PM
none for you :(



it depends on where you play, that's such a silly question to ask

ask the place where you're playing before you start spending your money

sidoody
06-10-2007, 01:52 AM
careful when u need to sell tickets...sometimes if u cant sell all that u said u would, you end up losing money, sometimes hundreds

PaperStSoapCo
06-10-2007, 02:14 AM
i havent been to a show yet where any of the bands made money. its all small time local stuff... and i never been to a real concert. i hang my head in shame

Dutch_Apples
06-10-2007, 04:41 AM
It depends on what you negoitate and what mood the booker is in when you seal the deal. I live in a rural area and most places start out at $300 for a 3 one hour sets (keep in mind that means you are playing covers and are in a bar) as for "venue".. if by venue you mean 30 minutes at the local KOC.. maybe $25 if people show up?

jazkel24
06-10-2007, 08:54 AM
It depends on lots of things- the venue, the number of people who show up, the kind of gig you're playing (covers, originals, light dinner music).

I'm working at getting gigs for my jazz quartet.

I figure (feel free to tell me if i'm wrong) we should be able to make $300 a night starting out. This might seem like a lot, but split it 4 ways, and use it cover petrol, and its really not too much. I know a duo (well-established, with an decent booking agency) who make $750 a gig. It takes time and connections (which can be established over time) and a fair bit of practice before you'll really start earning money off it.

My old drum teacher was doing 3 gigs a week, and he was putting money away. Cover bands will pay better at the start, there isn't too much money in originals until you build up a fairly large fanbase.

The most important thing- MOST IMPORTANT is be professional. Turn up early for everything, bring EVERYTHING you need, be over-prepared, be easy to contact, and at the start volunteer for anything and everything.

Gurgle!Argh!
06-10-2007, 10:09 AM
careful when u need to sell tickets...sometimes if u cant sell all that u said u would, you end up losing money, sometimes hundreds

don't play pay to play gigs. ever.

anewhope
06-12-2007, 05:16 PM
Depending how big you are on your scene will depend what you get. If you're a small fry then you'll probably get petrol money or a few drinks, medium then you might get a set amount of tickets you can sell and keep the takings for yourselves and if you're the big fish then you can negotiate.

It all goes on how many people you are going to be able to bring in and line the promoters pocket ;)

CAPTAINAMAZING
06-12-2007, 06:32 PM
Hmm this is an interesting thread. All of our gigs we've negotiated the price... and since we're young teens the most we've gotten is $200 :(

bassplayerric
06-12-2007, 06:41 PM
It's all going to depend on a variety of things, most have already been mentioned.

The trick is when starting out is getting people to come to your show and spend money at the place. The more money the place makes when you play, the more often you will be invited back. The more people come to see you, the more money you can ask for.

It's really like resume building.

anewhope
06-13-2007, 05:55 PM
Most importantly, if you're playing small venues then you should take it as an opportunity to play and not be concerned about what they pay you. We've driven hundreds of miles on tours and getting nothing but a pint or two but lauding the opportunity to be playing.

Think of it as you're given an opportunity to play, not an opportunity to get some cash

bassplayerric
06-13-2007, 07:32 PM
But don't get into the habit of playing for nothing, because that is all you will be offered. Word gets around.

Opening up for another band for free is okay, so are showcases and stuff like that.

NEVER pay to play :no: .

Club owners can usually pay DJ's a heck of a lot less than most bands. Keep that in mind.