Do re mi


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myearshurt
09-18-2007, 08:24 PM
what is it?

psychodelia
09-18-2007, 08:25 PM
Solfege. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solfege

ExtremeMetalFTW
09-18-2007, 08:28 PM
Do=B or C
Re=D
Mi=E

rage6945
09-18-2007, 08:37 PM
C major scale

bangoodcharlote
09-18-2007, 10:48 PM
Do=B or C
Re=D
Mi=E Nay.

C major scale And Nay.


Psychodelia's got it.

Vittu0666
09-18-2007, 11:36 PM
It's just another name for the scale degrees.

Do - 1
Re - 2
Mi - 3
Fa - 4
So - 5
La - 6
Ti - 7
Do - Octave

insideac
09-19-2007, 12:30 AM
Doe, a dear, a female dear!....Nah im just kidding. Its just names that they gave notes, I guess it helps you sound them out or something, if you play a C scale and say the Do Re Mi thing over it, itll fit.

nightwind
09-19-2007, 01:00 AM
Nay.

And Nay.


Psychodelia's got it.


Someone is bringing sexy back :cool:


There is such a thing as fixed Do though.

EDIT: I just realized that's in the wiki.

srecko
09-19-2007, 02:47 PM
Players sing those when they want to lock the major scale intervals in their heads.

Do Re Mi Fa So La Ti Do
T T S T T T S

hippie_cune
09-19-2007, 05:42 PM
its called the solfeg... theres one for each of the 12 degrees of a scale

Do di Re ri Mi Fa fi Sol si La li Ti Do (and its different when you descend)

Do is your root note.. the tonic.

think of the formula for the major scale 221 2 221 or WWH W WWH as intervals between each note

Do
-2-
Re
-2-
Mi
-1-
Fa
-2-
Sol
-2-
La
-2-
Ti
-1-
Do

dont listen to fools who say C major scale... its ALL the scales (infact when a scale has a name [major/minor/augmented/blues..ect] its formula will be the same no matter what note you start on) ... DUH!

nightwind
09-19-2007, 07:44 PM
dont listen to fools who say C major scale...


You shouldn't be so sure if you are unsure.

Fixed Do solfege.

hurlyz
09-19-2007, 08:58 PM
You shouldn't be so sure if you are unsure.

Fixed Do solfege.+1.... Where I live, everybody (even music teachers) uses that kind of "naming" for notes, fixed do solfege! (chord symbols using A to G but the rest, ie scales notes etc. are with Do to Si)

C = Do
D = Re
E = Mi
F = Fa
G = Sol
A = La
B = Si

:)

juan9122
09-19-2007, 09:02 PM
In Mexico all the teachers use Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Si instead of C D E F G A B

Sguit
09-19-2007, 09:12 PM
letters are used mostly (if not only) in english

cubs
09-19-2007, 09:18 PM
Yeah, in Mexico and almost any other latin country, if you tell someone to play Do they'll play a C.

Do=C
Re=D
Mi=E
Fa=F
Sol=G
La=A
Si=B

ibason
09-19-2007, 09:37 PM
Doe, a dear, a female dear!

Re, a drop of golden sun :dance:

Pabli7o
09-19-2007, 10:31 PM
They use it all over the world except the U.S.

My band's rhythm guitar player says "u know i dont speak spanish" whenever i talk to the bass player.

In school we sing in numbers in FIXED do. Why would you even try movable do? thats too fishy.

srecko
09-20-2007, 09:03 AM
Well, I'm pretty sure it's the intervals of the major scale.

Resiliance
09-20-2007, 09:14 AM
+1.... Where I live, everybody (even music teachers) uses that kind of "naming" for notes, fixed do solfege! (chord symbols using A to G but the rest, ie scales notes etc. are with Do to Si)

C = Do
D = Re
E = Mi
F = Fa
G = Sol
A = La
B = Si

:)

Yes, Belgium also uses absolute solfège note names. Even for chords. Cmaj would be Do groot (groot means large).

But... Movable do is also used.

I think it's stupid, but I have to adjust.

SdKfz
09-20-2007, 09:58 AM
It's just another name for the scale degrees.

Do - 1
Re - 2
Mi - 3
Fa - 4
So - 5
La - 6
Ti - 7
Do - Octave

No it is not another name for scale degrees. I am greek and I know that
do = C
re = D
mi = E
fa = F
Sol (not So) = G
La = A
Si (not Ti) = B

sTx
09-20-2007, 10:00 AM
^ Yeah, so, those are the notes for C major/A minor.

SdKfz
09-20-2007, 10:01 AM
its called the solfeg... theres one for each of the 12 degrees of a scale

Do di Re ri Mi Fa fi Sol si La li Ti Do (and its different when you descend)

Do is your root note.. the tonic.

think of the formula for the major scale 221 2 221 or WWH W WWH as intervals between each note

Do
-2-
Re
-2-
Mi
-1-
Fa
-2-
Sol
-2-
La
-2-
Ti
-1-
Do

dont listen to fools who say C major scale... its ALL the scales (infact when a scale has a name [major/minor/augmented/blues..ect] its formula will be the same no matter what note you start on) ... DUH!

Hey, I am greek and I know exactly what I am talking about ok? Here is Greece we use them for the notes.
What you said there is pure shyt. Do is C, can't you get it?
Don't talk about something you don't know about

nightwind
09-20-2007, 11:27 AM
Hey, I am greek and I know exactly what I am talking about ok? Here is Greece we use them for the notes.
What you said there is pure shyt. Do is C, can't you get it?
Don't talk about something you don't know about


^What does being greek have to do with anything? If we are pulling ranks, then I win. I'm a music major in university and am also a well reputed mod here. Not that being a mod means anything, but I know I haven't given loads of accurate information.

In most places but north america, Fixed Do is used. Do = C

In north america, Movable Do is used. Do = 1st degree of scale

No need for either you, or hippie to be so matter-of-fact when you are both wrong.

SdKfz
09-20-2007, 11:36 AM
Here in Greece people say ''Sol'' and mean G, that's all...

GuitarMunky
09-20-2007, 11:51 AM
No need to argue (although I understand this is UG)

wiki:

In music, solfege (or solmization) is a pedagogical technique for the teaching of sight-singing in which each note of the score is sung to a special syllable, called a "solfege syllable" (or "sol-fa syllable"). The seven syllables normally used for this practice in English-speaking countries are: Do, Re, Mi, Fa, So, La, and Ti. (In other Western countries, the older names "Sol" and "Si" are retained for "So" and "Ti".)
Traditionally, solfege is taught in a series of exercises of gradually increasing difficulty, each of which is also known as a "solfege" (or "solfeggio"). By extension, the word "solfeggio" may be used of an instrumental étude.

Fixed Do solfege
Fixed do solfege is employed in Israel, Spain, Italy, France, Belgium and Latin American countries, among others. In this system, each solfege syllable corresponds exactly to the name of a note, so that, e.g., any written "C" is sung as "Do", etc. Since these syllables are, in these countries, the names of the notes for which they are used, this system would be analogous to an English-speaker singing a tune on "A, B, C" etc.

Movable Do solfege
Movable do is frequently employed in England and America (although many American conservatories use French-style fixed do). Originally it was used throughout continental Europe as well, but in the mid-nineteenth century was phased out by fixed do. In this system, each solfege syllable corresponds, not to a pitch, but to a degree of the scale: the first scale degree of a (major) scale is always sung as do, the second scale degree as re, etc. (For minor keys, see below.) In movable do, a given tune is therefore always solfeged on the same syllables, no matter what key it is in.
The names used for movable do differ slightly than those used for fixed do, because chromatically altered syllables are usually included, and the English names of the syllables are usually used:

nightwind
09-20-2007, 11:52 AM
Here in Greece people say ''Sol'' and mean G, that's all...


Yes, but Greece is not everywhere.

SdKfz
09-20-2007, 12:26 PM
Yes, but Greece is not everywhere.

:peace:
Hey, did you know that the music modes were invented in Ancient Greece?

nightwind
09-20-2007, 12:41 PM
Yep. They were also named after places that represented that feeling. For example, what is now Turkey was called Phrygia, and was apparently a pretty lively place. Children were made to listen to Dorian music, because of it's sweet serene feelings. Similar to how we have parental advisory stickers on CDs nowadays, parents controlled what modes of music they listened to. There is a story about how a man went to Sparta with a lyre of 8 strings instead of 7. The guards refused entry because they couldn't be sure of his intentions with that extra string.

Greeks did a whole lot more than just modes. They treated music like science. They weren't so interested as much in the actual art of it as discovering how it worked. It was ranked among math astronomy and geometry.

You guys did however, suck pretty hard at notation. Greeks used a strange system of grammatic symbols for every note. There was about 60 different symbols for a three octave span. To make things more complicated, different symbols were used for vocal music than instrumental music. It's no wonder this system didn't catch on.

SdKfz
09-20-2007, 01:00 PM
I see...
The thing about the 8-string lyre is pretty funny, but I believe it.
Interesting, once a again a stranger know more things about Greece than I do...

nightwind
09-20-2007, 01:06 PM
^I'm sure you know plenty of the actual living breathing culture of Greece. I just read books!

SdKfz
09-20-2007, 02:06 PM
Do you know a Lysandros from Ancient Sparta? That's my name!

marmoseti
09-20-2007, 02:11 PM
Is that the same person as Lysander? I had to learn about him at school (not music related), campaigned in Thrace didn't he? I can't really remember, it was last year :)

And just to prevent this from being spam, I've always used do re mi etc. to be any major scale, but that's pretty irrelevant because the actual answer has already been found :)

SdKfz
09-20-2007, 02:14 PM
Is that the same person as Lysander? I had to learn about him at school (not music related), campaigned in Thrace didn't he? I can't really remember, it was last year :)

And just to prevent this from being spam, I've always used do re mi etc. to be any major scale, but that's pretty irrelevant because the actual answer has already been found :)

Yes, he is the same person as Lysander.
So you don't use do re mi for minor scales?

hippie_cune
09-20-2007, 05:07 PM
^I'm sure you know plenty of the actual living breathing culture of Greece. I just read books!


yes i seem to be missing the importance of being greek..

well check this dude... im a texan!

and i go to skool for music.. so i too know exactly what i speak of...

and Do IS NOT C... it can be, it is obviously what most people say when you ask them what do is..

but unless youre working with a fixed do [though in my college training i have NEVER come across this] Do is JUST the root note... and its octave.

hippie_cune
09-20-2007, 05:10 PM
No need for either you, or hippie to be so matter-of-fact when you are both wrong.


hey neither of us are wrong..

we just live in different countries.

nightwind where you go to skool at? im gettin my associates in a community college, then im gonna transfer to a big uni.

nightwind
09-21-2007, 12:07 AM
yes i seem to be missing the importance of being greek..

well check this dude... im a texan!

and i go to skool for music.. so i too know exactly what i speak of...

and Do IS NOT C... it can be, it is obviously what most people say when you ask them what do is..

but unless youre working with a fixed do [though in my college training i have NEVER come across this] Do is JUST the root note... and its octave.


You are unclear on what fixed Do is. This means that Do is C. Not to be confused with movable Do, which means Do is the root note.

I am aware you live in different places, but both of you had said that "my way is the only way you are wrong". In saying that, you were wrong.

I'm going to the university of Ottawa in Canada.

hurlyz
09-21-2007, 12:42 AM
^ Hah nice I live close to you then... I live in Montreal's suburbs... not very far!

insideac
09-21-2007, 12:43 AM
Yeah well...I live really close to psychedelia! so hah! lol

marmoseti
09-21-2007, 11:26 AM
So you don't use do re mi for minor scales?

I don't use it at all, but I've only sung it for a major scale before :)

hippie_cune
09-21-2007, 11:31 AM
see my first message...

the minor scale still uses the solfeg.. its there are different names for each note, so for the minor you just use the flattened MI..which i think is me (pronounced may)..

but dont take my word on the 'me' part.. cause im actually more sure that thats what Mi is called when you sharp it.

hurlyz
09-21-2007, 02:44 PM
Yeah well...I live really close to psychedelia! so hah! loland you're moving (I hope) close to me haha :p: