The History of - Queens of the Stone Age


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red157
11-04-2007, 05:34 PM
It’s ten years ago (Or the 20th November, 1997 to be more precise); four men take to the stage at the OK Hotel in Seattle, playing just seven songs. This marked the first formal gig of Josh Homme’s new band Queens of the Stone Age and was the beginning of something bigger than even he could have expected.

Early QOTSA
The band had existed under the name Gamma Ray since 1996, even managing to release an EP before the German metal band of the same name threatened legal action. After the name change and successful debut gig, Homme performed with the line-up of Matt Cameron, John McBain and Mike Johnson only twice more. A split EP was even released with Homme’s previous band, the desert legends Kyuss, before Queens of the Stone Age played live again. It was a completely different group of players that accompanied him in touring the self titled debut record. Co-owner of the Rancho De La Luna (Home of the Desert Sessions), Dave Catching joined alongside two other Kyuss veterans, drummer Alfredo Hernandez and bassist Nick Oliveri. The latter was found by Homme performing in his own band, Mondo Generator, after recording had completed and thus didn’t appear on the album (Besides his voice accepting a place in QOTSA on the track “I Was a Teenage Hand Model”).

Queens of the Stone Age the record was received enthusiastically by those who heard it. Wildly different to anything Homme had done before, it’s seen as an attempt at escaping the Stoner rock tag that had dogged him through most of his career. A mix of all the genre’s that had influenced him, it was Homme’s music with him saying they “should be able to play what we think is good”. Unlike many bands penchant for not playing their older songs, much of the album is still played live today. The moderate success of the record allowed QOTSA to tour throughout 1999, though by June of that year, Alfredo Hernandez announced his decision to leave. Such sudden line-up changes are now synonymous with the band and a new drummer was found in Gene Trautmann (Who himself lost out to Hernandez in an audition for Kyuss).

Rated R Era
As the new millennium dawned, Queens of the Stone Age found that their second album was eagerly anticipated among those sick of the endless stream of nu-metal bands. What would eventually become Rated R contained everything even those with a passing knowledge of QOTSA would now associate with the band (Numerous guest musicians, vocalists and styles). They had found their crossover hit with “The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret” and their anthem in “Feel Good Hit of the Summer”. Though the less than subtle narcotics references didn’t do anything to dissuade the public view that they were a ‘drugs band’. It also marked the first appearances of Oliveri and former Screaming Trees singer, Mark Lanegan, performing vocals on a QOTSA album; not to mention benefiting immensely from Chris Goss’ production.

Touring for the album kicked off in 2000, boosted by the addition of master lap steel player Brendon McNichol (Replacing Catching). Rated R was a critical and commercial success and released around the same time as Mondo Generator’s first album – Cocaine Rodeo, allowing some flexibility in set lists as Oliver notes, “We do Desert Sessions songs live, we do some Mondo songs, we really try to mix it up live.” By 2001, Mark Lanegan began touring with the band, a feat he’d continue for four years. Things didn’t go all well; they infamously played their worst show ever at the German Rock am Ring festival, causing each member to brand themselves with the same tattoo, "Freitag 4.15” (Friday, and time of day). Queens of the Stone Age had managed to break into the mainstream and it was with their next release that they’d truly enter the public’s consciousness.

Deaf Era
If expectations weren’t raised enough for their next album, the bar was placed even higher when Homme announced former Nirvana-drummer Dave Grohl as the replacement for Gene Trautmann (Who recorded only two tracks before being replaced). Mark Lanegan also announced he was appearing on the forthcoming record, as well as touring, where he’d be joined by former member of A Perfect Circle Troy Van Leeuwen as the next in the series of QOTSA multi-instrumentalists. Upon release in 2002, Songs for the Deaf was received ecstatically by critics and public alike, boosted by the enormous success of lead single “No One Knows”. Grohl also toured in support of the album, playing a series of high profile festival gigs as well as smaller clubs, before playing his final gig in Japan. He fondly recalls his time in Queens of the Stone Age as “the best band I’ve ever played in.”

Things moved on without Grohl, as Homme hired former Danzig man-mountain Joey Castillo as his replacement. The band’s profile rose even higher with the release of second single “Go With the Flow” and it’s groundbreaking music video. Throughout 2003, they continued touring, managing a string of dates for the second Mondo Generator album, A Drug Problem That Never Existed, amongst their own shows. It was in January of the following year when things suddenly grinded to a halt. Oliveri played his final show (In a mini-skirt to boot) on January 11th and it was announced by Homme soon after that the often naked but always bald bassist had been fired. Reaction to the move was one of shock and confusion, not least from the record company who forced out an EP of old tracks instead of the expected full length album. Homme needed time before returning under the Queens of the Stone Age name, instead spending the rest of the year drumming for Eagles of Death Metal before picking the rest of the band up where they left off.

Lullabies Era
Much of Lullabies to Paralyze was written when Oliveri was still in the band and it seemed Homme’s goal to get the record out of the way, as was the anamocity facing him in some corners. Desert Sessions player and some time QOTSA producer Alain Johannes replaced Oliveri both on the album and life, with his partner Natasha Shneider accomanying the band on tour. Lanegan also contributed to both the album and the early stages of the tour, before deciding his Queens tenure was duly over. Like the previous releases, Lullabies was met with critical and commercial success upon it’s release in 2005, though not quite to the scale of Songs for the Deaf. That same year, Queens of the Stone Age released a live DVD/CD entitled Over the Years and Through the Woods, taken from two shows in London, England. A notable performance came on December 20th, when Kyuss lead vocalist, John Garcia, performed three songs with Homme and the band. A well earned break was taken in 2006, with a few festivals and shows the only appearences in a relatively QOTSA free year.

Era Vulgaris
It seems, for many reasons, that 2007 and the latest album, Era Vulgaris, marks the true return for Queens of the Stone Age after the firing of Oliveri. The same line-up who recorded Lullabies returned, with Lanegan even making a solitary appearance on “River in the Road”. Sadly, it marked the departure of Johannes and Shneider, though they were quickly replaced before QOTSA embarked on their next tour, the largest for four years. So brought in were relative unknowns Mikey ‘Shoes’ Schuman on bass and Dean Fertita as a second multi-instrumentalist. Chris Goss returned for production on what would eventually become a bigger commercial success than Lullabies despite none of the lead singles (“3’s & 7’s” and “Sick, Sick, Sick”) doing paticularly well in the charts. Stylistically, it depicts another stark change that may not be to everyones tastes, but remains a great record, a result of the longest time spent recording a Queens of the Stone Age record yet.

QOTSA has always been Josh Homme’s band. His project where he can bounce off whoever’s with him at the time, to make whatever sounds best to him. That can easily be forgotten when considering the great character’s that have been in the band over the years (Grohl, Oliveri and now the bouncing Schuman). It’s the music that matters, however, so let’s hope they’ll still be around in another decade, as inventive and straight up fantastic as they’ve ever been.

This article any good?

HawkaLuigi
11-04-2007, 10:59 PM
It's pretty good, but maybe you could throw in some odd facts about things that went on with the band, maybe some songs to check out from each era, etc? Just a thought. :cheers:


:livid:

Tom.
11-05-2007, 05:41 PM
Good article, the only improvements would be highlighting some of the key songs of the album and bit misc/trivial information on each era. Ooh and the go with the flow video was hardly groundbreaking, check out 'psychosis safari' by 80's matchbox b-line, srsly, it's very similar

http://youtube.com/watch?v=QRJ2fChqClE

But overall, great article.

psychodelia
11-05-2007, 09:45 PM
It’s ten years ago (Or the 20th November, 1997 to be more precise); four men take to the stage at the OK Hotel in Seattle, playing just seven songs. This marked the first formal gig of Josh Homme’s new band Queens of the Stone Age and was the beginning of something bigger than even he could have expected.

Underdeveloped introduction. I certainly wouldn't use your opening sentence in its current form. You begin by saying "it's ten years ago"... the "it" doesn't refer to anything. Certainly rearrange it to say something like, "On the 20th of November, 1997, four men took to the stage at the OK Hotel in Seattle, playing just seven songs." I still am not a big fan, but it's an improvement. I think the main thing that's killing your introduction is that you don't really have a thesis... saying QOTSA has become bigger than Josh Homme imagined is just a vague generalization.

Early QOTSA
The band what band? Right, Queens of the Stone Age. Say "Queens of the Stone Age", rather than "the band" at the beginning of a paragraph. had I know it's a minute thing, but you can remove "had". If you can say the same thing with fewer words, do it! existed under the name Gamma Ray since 1996, even managing to release an EP before the German metal band of the same name threatened legal action. After the name change and successful debut gig, Homme performed with the line-up of Matt Cameron, John McBain and Mike Johnson only twice more.You haven't mentioned this lineup at all before this point, so bringing it up as though we should be familiar with the names is a bit weird. Certainly introduce their names before this point, and maybe consider expanding a bit on the band at this stage A split EP was even released with Homme’s previous band, the desert legends Kyuss, before Queens of the Stone Age played live again. It was a completely different group of players that accompanied him in touring the self titled debut record. could easily be reworded to say, "A completely different group of players accompanied him in touring the self-titled debut record." Less words, and you don't have the vague "it" at the beginning. Co-owner of the Rancho De La Luna (Home of the Desert Sessions), Dave Catching I'd put this guy's name at the beginning of the sentence joined alongside two other Kyuss veterans, drummer Alfredo Hernandez and bassist Nick Oliveri. The latter was found by Homme performing in his own band, Mondo Generator, after recording had completed and thus didn’t appear on the album (Besides his voice accepting a place in QOTSA on the track “I Was a Teenage Hand Model”).

Queens of the Stone Age I believe record titles are italicized the record was received enthusiastically by those who heard it. Wildly different to anything Homme had done before, it’s seen as an attempt at escaping the Stoner rock tag that had dogged him through most of his career. A mix of all the genre’s <- no apostrophe that had again, don't need the "had" influenced him, it was Homme’s music with him saying they “should be able to play what we think is good”this is confusing, maybe rework the last part of the sentence to be something like, "...Homme's music; Homme said the band, 'should be able to play what we think is good.'" Even then, the quote is a bit confusing; it's Homme's music, but the band also contributes what they think is good? Elaborate on that point, perhaps. . Unlike many bands <- you need an apostrophe penchant for not playing their older songs, much of the album is still played live today. The moderate success of the record allowed QOTSA to tour throughout 1999, though by June of that year, Alfredo Hernandez announced his decision to leave. Such sudden line-up changes are now synonymous with the band and a new drummer was found in Gene Trautmann (Who himself lost out to Hernandez in an audition for Kyuss).

Rated R Era
As the new millennium dawned, Queens of the Stone Age found that their second album was eagerly anticipated among those sick of the endless stream of nu-metal bands. What would eventually become All of this is unnecessary; I'd begin the sentence with something like, "The new album, titled Rated R, contained..." Rated R contained everything even those with a passing knowledge of QOTSA would now associate with the band (Numerous guest musicians, vocalists and styles)since these things (guest musicians, etc.) seem to be an important point in this sentence, I wouldn't put them in parenthesis. I'd also consider reworking the sentence in general . They had again, I don't think this "had" is necessary found their crossover hit with “The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret” and their anthem in “Feel Good Hit of the Summer”. Though the less than subtle narcotics references didn’t do anything to dissuade the public view that they were a ‘drugs band’. shouldn't be two sentences! Combine It also marked the first appearances of Oliveri and former Screaming Trees singer, Mark Lanegan, performing vocals on a QOTSA album; not to mention benefiting immensely from Chris Goss’ production.

Touring for the album kicked off in 2000, boosted by the addition of master lap steel player Brendon McNichol (Replacing Catching). Rated R was a critical and commercial success and released around the same time as Mondo Generator’s first album – Cocaine Rodeo, allowing some flexibility in set lists as Oliver notes, “We do Desert Sessions songs live, we do some Mondo songs, we really try to mix it up live.” By 2001, Mark Lanegan began touring with the band, a feat he’d continue for four years. Things didn’t go all well; they infamously played their worst show ever at the German Rock am Ring festival, causing each member to brand themselves with the same tattoo, "Freitag 4.15” (Friday, and time of day). Queens of the Stone Age had managed to break into the mainstream and it was with their next release that they’d truly enter the public’s consciousness.



More in next post...

psychodelia
11-05-2007, 09:45 PM
Deaf Era
If expectations weren’t raised enough for their next album, the bar was placed even higher when Homme announced former Nirvana-drummer Dave Grohl as the replacement for Gene Trautmann (Who recorded only two tracks before being replaced). Mark Lanegan also announced he was appearing on the forthcoming record, as well as touring, where he’d be joined by former member of A Perfect Circle Troy Van Leeuwen as the next in the series of QOTSA multi-instrumentalists. Upon release in 2002, Songs for the Deaf was received ecstatically by critics and public alike, boosted by the enormous success of lead single “No One Knows”. Grohl also toured in support of the album, playing a series of high profile festival gigs as well as smaller clubs, before playing his final gig in Japan. He fondly recalls his time in Queens of the Stone Age as “the best band I’ve ever played in.”

Things moved on without Grohl, as Homme hired former Danzig man-mountain Joey Castillo as his replacement. The band’s profile rose even higher with the release of second single “Go With the Flow” and it’sI believe there's no apostrophe here groundbreaking music video. Throughout 2003, they continued touring, managing a string of dates for the second Mondo Generator album, A Drug Problem That Never Existed, amongst their own shows. It was in January of the following year when things suddenly grinded to a halt.I'd revise this sentence to make it more concise: remove "it was" and "when", and replace grinded with ground. Oliveri played his final show (In a mini-skirt to boot) on January 11th and it was announced by Homme soon after that the often naked but always bald bassist had been fired. Reaction to the move was one of shock and confusion, not least from the record company who forced out an EP of old tracks instead of the expected full length album. Homme needed time before returning under the Queens of the Stone Age name, instead spending the rest of the year drumming for Eagles of Death Metal before picking the rest of the band up where they left off.

Lullabies Era
Much of Lullabies to Paralyze was written when Oliveri was still in the band and it seemed Homme’s goal to get the record out of the way, as was the anamocity use spellcheck! facing him in some corners. Desert Sessions player and some time QOTSA producer Alain Johannes replaced Oliveri both on the album and life lol, weird way to put it. Perhaps just say that he replaced Oliveri as the bass player? , with his partner Natasha Shneider accomanying spellcheck! also, his partner? Is that his lover, or did this guy play an instrument for QOTSA? the band on tour. Lanegan also contributed to both the album and the early stages of the tour, before deciding his Queens tenure was duly over. Like the previous releases, Lullabies was met with critical and commercial success upon it’s release in 2005, though not quite to the scale of Songs for the Deaf. That same year, Queens of the Stone Age released a live DVD/CD entitled Over the Years and Through the Woods, taken from two shows in London, England. A notable performance came on December 20th, when Kyuss lead vocalist, John Garcia, performed three songs with Homme and the band. A well earned break was taken in 2006, with a few festivals and shows the only appearences in a relatively QOTSA free year.

Era Vulgaris
It seems, for many reasons, that I'd eliminate everything before 2007, but that's up to you 2007 and the latest album, Era Vulgaris, marks just "mark" the true return for Queens of the Stone Age after the firing of Oliveri. The same line-up who recorded Lullabies returned, with Lanegan even making a solitary appearance on “River in the Road”. Sadly, it marked the departure of Johannes and Shneider, though they were quickly replaced before QOTSA embarked on their next tour, the largest for four years you mean the largest IN four years. Unless it's a four year tour? . So brought in Revise this sentence to begin "Homme brought in ...." were relative unknowns Mikey ‘Shoes’ Schuman on bass and Dean Fertita as a second multi-instrumentalist. Chris Goss returned for production on what would eventually become a bigger commercial success than Lullabies despite none of the lead singles (“3’s & 7’s” and “Sick, Sick, Sick”) doing paticularly well in the charts. Stylistically, it depicts another stark change that may not be to everyones tastes, but remains a great record, a result of the longest time spent recording a Queens of the Stone Age record yet.

QOTSA has always been Josh Homme’s band. His project where he can bounce off whoever’s say whoever is with, not whoever's with with him at the time, to make whatever sounds best to him. That can easily be forgotten when considering the great character’s no aopstrophe that have been in the band over the years (Grohl, Oliveri and now the bouncing Schuman). It’s the music that matters, however, so let’s hope they’ll still be around in another decade, as inventive and straight up fantastic as they’ve ever been.

This article any good?

Comments, suggestions etc. are bolded. I think your article mostly lacks any definitive statement about the band, but I suppose that we can ignore this if you are purely reporting facts. In that case, beef up on the facts. Don't assume everyone knows these players, so name them and what they do. Josh Homme seems to be a huge part of this band, so some background information on him would probably be great. An analysis of the band's sound and its evolution could be interesting, more stories like the one about the worst gig (what exactly made it bad anyway).

Also, you might want to cite any sources you use, and consider an important question; what does your article offer that other things don't? Why couldn't we just go on Wikipedia to get information on QOTSA? Think about that, and maybe you'll get some ideas for direction.

Cheers, let me know if you're confused about anything :)

red157
11-06-2007, 08:46 AM
Wow, thanks psychodelia.

All valid and constructive points I'll take in to account once it's rejected (Submitted it a few days ago... Hoping it does get rejected now).

I was using word to write the article, but the spellchecker failed towards the end and I didn't notice.

But yeah, thanks.

rockguitarist20
03-26-2008, 02:07 AM
awesome info, nice detail

thanks man