Advice for new bands.


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Rykr
12-07-2007, 03:38 PM
It seems that there are a few real new players on here so hopefully I won't offend by offering some unsolicited advice. I don't know everything, but I have played in a few bands over the years and I have been to many local shows when I wasn't playing; and I have picked up a few things.

1. Keep your cool! Man, it doesn't matter how great you are, if your bandmates have bad attitudes, it will be remembered. "Who? Oh yeah, that band of a$$holes. What did they play again?" You don't want to be in that band.

2. Keep your egoes in check. Another thing that is seen/heard all of the time. "We are the best band around. We are gonna get signed quick. We are better than them but they get more $, stage time, fans, poonani, etc..." Nothing runs possible fans/friends away quicker than stroking yourself in public.

3. Be punctual! If you are supposed to play @ 10, be there @ 9. No one likes to have the lineup changed because a band didn't show up on time (especially when they do it on purpose to get a better time slot). If it can go wrong it will. Give yourself enough time to relax (or whatever your preshow ritual is), tune up, and sound check. Be prepared for the lineup to change, even at the last minute. Don't get mad if people start leaving before you play, it happens. Start your set strong so that if anyone is getting ready to leave they will change their minds!

4. Be patient. You may get screwed 5 times at a bar to get a good show or more $. Pay your dues by playing and being professional.

5. Stay semi-sober. (Doesn't apply to everyone, some handle alcohol/drugs well) If you need a drink or two to loosen up, cool. Don't over do it. My old band played a show one time and our other guitarist/singer got hammered, dropped to his knees and barfed right in the middle of a song. Last three songs he couldn't even stand to play. We took the mic. away from him and played some instrumental **** after that.

6. Don't give the bar staff crap. That is a good way to not get invited back.

7. Don't talk negatively about the crowd while on stage. You never know if the mic is gonna pick up "This crowd sucks!"

8. Do be confident. After hundreds of shows I still get stage fright. I used to vomit preshow. You can't be too timid on stage though. That doesn't encourage much crowd response. I am still working on this. I have always been the guy that had to kind of keep things in check with my previous bands. I don't have to in the band I am in now. Now I realize that I am not a great performer. Picture Malcom Young that's me.

9. Play to the crowd. Talk to them (not for minutes at a time though, it tends to get boring), include them in the show.

10. Be prepared!!!! Don't go to a show without cords, drumsticks, power strips (you can never have enough of these it seems), extra strings, instruments (you would not believe how common that one is), picks, I.D. (if playing in a bar), and be in tune. Delays over stupid stuff upset other bands and fans.

11. Don't destroy property. Kicking monitors off of a stage is fun but resist the temptation. Some bars actually encourage putting stickers or graffitti up, if not, don't do it.

12. Kind of goes along with most of these, but, PLAY NICE. With everybody. Even people you don't like. You never know where a great hook up is gonna come from. That band that you don't like may be able to hook you up with some great shows, gear, or contacts. ALWAYS GET CONTACT INFORMATION. From everyone. People in folk bands have set me up with shows. It's not a competition so help people out.

13. Have fun. After you work hard enough to get a few songs together and sounding good. Go enjoy it!


Sorry if I rambled on. There are so many things that I have forgotten and so many things that you will learn along the way. There is no way to list everything here. I am sure that other people have even better advice and will list it, so listen.

Deagle-Eyes
12-07-2007, 03:53 PM
Great. I'd do a column/lesson on this, if I were yoU!

phillyguitar
12-07-2007, 03:59 PM
Great. I'd do a column/lesson on this, if I were yoU!

Yeah man, a lot of good comments mostly about attitudes and respect for people and property, but this is a great set of rules/laws to follow

Rykr
12-08-2007, 01:04 AM
It seems like no matter where you go or who you see, attitudes are pretty much a problem. I guess it is kind of like table manners or golf course etiquette. The things that you don't know or think about are the ones that will pi$$ someone off. If someone really makes you mad, suck it up until you leave and then complain the whole way home.
Just my $ .02.

axemanchris
12-08-2007, 11:01 AM
Well done.

CT

claptonfan55
12-08-2007, 03:57 PM
Very good advice.

walt52196
12-16-2007, 04:02 PM
Yeah that a good way to do thing cheers m8 I always give them my opion but in a nice way I never used a cursed word or anything along that line But if there drinking remember that the drinks is talking not them

Pabli7o
12-16-2007, 04:24 PM
What bothered me about my band mates was that they never wanted to see the other bands play.... yet they didn't like it when everybody left after their friend's band played and there was was half the audience when we went up.

SUPPORT LOCAL MUSIC. buy their demo even if you dont like them, talk to them after their show "good job" "Great tunes" idk..."nice guitar!" and ask them their myspace and ****, you'll build up contacts and more ways to get invited to new gigs. makes sense.

What turns me off from a band is their extra hyper stage presence. 16 year olds acting like rockstars. If there're (and most times there are) any producers or agents looking for talent, they would laugh at your face.

I have some more... they'll come out soon.

Great post.

HethaHORRIFIC
12-17-2007, 08:34 AM
What bothered me about my band mates was that they never wanted to see the other bands play.... yet they didn't like it when everybody left after their friend's band played and there was was half the audience when we went up.

SUPPORT LOCAL MUSIC. buy their demo even if you dont like them, talk to them after their show "good job" "Great tunes" idk..."nice guitar!" and ask them their myspace and ****, you'll build up contacts and more ways to get invited to new gigs. makes sense.

What turns me off from a band is their extra hyper stage presence. 16 year olds acting like rockstars. If there're (and most times there are) any producers or agents looking for talent, they would laugh at your face.

I have some more... they'll come out soon.

Great post.



my band came third in the local band comp last year. we had only been together for a month or two before hand, so the music wasnt to great or tight. but unlike all the other bands, who stood still as a statue, played their songs and left, we sorta put on a rockstar attitude went out there and jumped around, my bass player even found his way onto the top of the foh speaker stack. chucked in with a guitar spin, the people loved us. and getting into the final and placing shows the judges did as well.
so rockstarness is okay, just as long as you dont over do it. and it doesnt look completely fake. eg. nerd with glasses head banging.

godisasniper
12-19-2007, 05:19 PM
hey, I object to the nerd with glasses headbanging comment, being a nerd with glasses who headbangs (and thus loses his glasses)

Zeelod
12-19-2007, 08:55 PM
Another tip to remember is that fans basicaly= customers. Now, no matter how much it is about the music that you're creating, you still want people to listen and support your band and what not. You have to treat your music like your band's "product", and your job as the band is to sell the fans( who are basicaly your customers) your music.

Another thing is that Sucess, leads to more Sucess.

Developing contacts with other bands/fans/venues/local radio/ and any other contact is essential to the growth of your band. A break can come from anywhere, even small ones.

Keep reminding people you exist with bulletins, e-mails, shows, telling other people about your band, and at shows. Hand out flyers and stickers and what not with your band's website on it or something.

Yeah, just a few tips from me.

axemanchris
12-19-2007, 11:28 PM
Another tip to remember is that fans basicaly= customers. Now, no matter how much it is about the music that you're creating, you still want people to listen and support your band and what not. You have to treat your music like your band's "product", and your job as the band is to sell the fans( who are basicaly your customers) your music.

Another thing is that Sucess, leads to more Sucess.

Developing contacts with other bands/fans/venues/local radio/ and any other contact is essential to the growth of your band. A break can come from anywhere, even small ones.

Keep reminding people you exist with bulletins, e-mails, shows, telling other people about your band, and at shows. Hand out flyers and stickers and what not with your band's website on it or something.

Yeah, just a few tips from me.

:dance: :dance: :dance:

Nicely done.

CT

SlackerBabbath
12-20-2007, 10:05 AM
Another tip to remember is that fans basicaly= customers. Now, no matter how much it is about the music that you're creating, you still want people to listen and support your band and what not. You have to treat your music like your band's "product", and your job as the band is to sell the fans( who are basicaly your customers) your music.

Actualy, as a professional musician, your job will more than likely usualy be to attract customers to bars so the brewery can sell them their product. That is after all what you will be paid for at the end of most gigs. But it's a good idea to sell them your product while they're there. Then maybe if your very lucky, you'll eventualy be in a position where you're job is to actualy sell your product. :D

axemanchris
12-20-2007, 08:07 PM
Very, very true.

CT

walidb123
12-27-2007, 07:39 AM
Cool advice man.

rhoads4ever
12-27-2007, 01:03 PM
Kind of goes along with most of these, but, PLAY NICE. With everybody. Even people you don't like. You never know where a great hook up is gonna come from. That band that you don't like may be able to hook you up with some great shows, gear, or contacts. ALWAYS GET CONTACT INFORMATION. From everyone. People in folk bands have set me up with shows. It's not a competition so help people out.

FANTASTIC advice.

I also want to add the biggest mistake I SEE in local music. Being in a band is about being that kid who's always talking about his band and inviting people to his shows, posting fliers, advertising, going to see other bands etc. etc. If you want to be involved in the music scene and in playing, TAKE THE TIME to be involved in a music scene. I've gone and seen one of my buddies band and at my next show had him, his band and their girlfriends etc come, thats about 8 other people to my show just for me taking about an hour out of my time. Don't be embarrased to be in a band, if you are, why are you in one?

JackFlash19
12-28-2007, 05:30 AM
Yea guys. all great advice. I'll contribute some of my own.

You may get screwed by a bar/club/booking agent, but there really isn't much you can do besides stand up for yourself and take it all in stride. However if you don't bring alot of people to a show, and at the end of the night the bar doesn't pay you as much as you expected, don't get angry. The bars want you to come play so they can make money off of you (and vice versa). Bands and venues are a symbiotic entity and work together.

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE help support your local scene. I know alot of bands leave and their fans dart off after they don't have to be there anymore. DON'T do this. Not only will you make contacts with the bands you're playing with that night, you might actually like their music and be able to take something from their show and implement it into yours (think 'doing research').

Rhodes had FANTASTIC advice : Go to shows besides yours! Hit up a band via myspace, tell them you're from so-and-so band, and you are lookin forward to checking them out. At the show, reintroduce yourself, and talk to them for a bit. Bands love fans coming out, but they value and respect their peers interest and effort in supporting them. This may not seem like a big deal, but actually going out and making the physical contact with them (as opposed to entirely being on myspace etc) will go miles further for you than the internet ever will. It's true, if you support your friends (or fellow bands), they will support you.

Also a great idea to have is business cards. If you are in a band, yes you ARE a business. Have something simple, like a logo, your band name, your myspace, and contact information. Have some in your pocket to give to people asking about your band. I can't tell you how many times I've been in clubs, the music has been loud and you're having trouble getting the name and such across. Not only will it set your name in their heads easier, they will put it in their pocket, only to come across it later (that's three times they've heard your name->on stage, you in conversation, and the card later). Most likely they will at least check out your myspace. And most likely they will keep the card in their wallet or planner (along with the other business cards) and tada!

Teaming up with other bands to do things like rallies, benefit shows, and such is also a great idea. You can usually recruit businesses for free and allow them to advertise. Raise money for a cause, bring a lot of people together to hear you, your fellow bands, and sell some merch.

But yes, SUPPORT YOUR MUSIC SCENE!!! Drag your friends to shows, go to shows alone just to hear a band. You love music anyway, so it shouldn't be a chore.

Be as professional and courteous as possible (as everyone else has said). Give someone the benefit of the doubt if they are short or curt with you. They might be having a bad day, you never know. Cut them a little slack, and they may return the favor for your kindness. Don't get down if clubs don't message you back or book you for a while. You have to realize that there are COUNTLESS bands asking to play there, or they are booking bands they want to have a certain date. Keep at it, but try not to badger them. Nothing turns clubs off more than a band who repeatedly asks "can we come play?'.

Yes, show up early please. Load in, and if there is a band after you, don't take your sweet time getting off stage. MOVE IT! The other band has to load everything on AND get setup to not cut into their set length.

Lastly, at a gig, this should go without saying, but sadly, it still happens......DO NOT STEAL STUFF THAT ISN'T YOURS!!! Pedals, cables, guitar stands, metronomes, in-ears....anything that's not yours, DON'T take it! We are all broke-ass musicians and we work just as hard to buy that guitar as you did. Don't strip it from us. Also a tip, take colored electrical tape, and wrap it around 1 end of all of your bands cables. Write the band name on it so it's easy to find. I've saved cables I almost left behind like this, and didn't accidentally take cables that weren't mine bc I saw there wasn't tape on it.

Not much else I can think of at the moment. Professionalism, courtesy, and scene support. Top 3.

Zeelod
12-29-2007, 02:48 AM
Actualy, as a professional musician, your job will more than likely usualy be to attract customers to bars so the brewery can sell them their product. That is after all what you will be paid for at the end of most gigs. But it's a good idea to sell them your product while they're there. Then maybe if your very lucky, you'll eventualy be in a position where you're job is to actualy sell your product. :D

oh, yeah I see what you're saying. Where I come from there aren't really any bar venues or pubs, just venues specificaly for music and bands. The vnues make money by the bands fans basicaly.

slut_shuttle
12-29-2007, 08:05 AM
on point Id like to add on, if someone is being a bitch to you, accept it. not only because of the Benifit-of-the-doubt thing, but some people hold grudges. and some people have alot of freinds. and even more people are a nasty combonation of the two. talking **** about another band/person/bar/etc publicly, all those people can and most likely will completly trash you and your band. watch your mouth, publicly.
underage people, drink your beer and smoke your weed at home, not backstage. no musician or venue owner likes seeing 16 year olds leaning against there amps drinking a beer.
make sure you try and play what people want to hear. and I'm definetly for interecting with the crowd. thats all i got

Paleo Pete
12-30-2007, 01:54 PM
All good advice, especially the original post, very well done.

A lot of this I've seen personally. I played with a classic rock band years ago a half mile from a metal club. After my band built a good reputation we played there one night and two songs before our 2nd break these 4 guys come almost running up to the stage, pointing and talking to each other, checking out the equipment, dressed in obviously metal stage clothes. (think 80's hair bands - spandex, etc, kind of a Dokken/Motley Crue look) Turns out they were the metal band from down the street on their break, jumped in the car and raced to our show to catch us for a few minutes, then back to their show. I never expected it, but that metal band and a couple of others that played there sent us a lot of people when they started teling friends and people in the audiences about us. It turned out the metal bands down the street all loved our classic rock band and were great advertisements for us. We made a point to go see them when we could also, and I tried to go see every band in town when possible, a couple of them always insisted I sit in and would tell the audience where and when my band played next.

Stealing...Can't agree more, very bad idea. Especially stealing from the club. I had to kick out a drummer who stole some stuff from a club, he tried to start a fight and the club never hired us again even though we got a new drummer and played a show there free to make amends.

Drinking... 2 beers and you play sloppy, 3 and you suck. Get drunk twice and I'll kick you out of the band, guaranteed. Play now, party later. Consider the band your job. would you get drunk on the job if you were driving for UPS? No, so don't drink when you play. It's your job, treat it as such.

Professionalism...that includes a lot of the other individual points. Have your equipment ready to go, with extra mic and guitar cables, extra batteries, extra tubes, a lot of tube amp players have a standby amp on hand. Be there early every time and HELP LOAD THE DAMN EQUIPMENT. Very few things are as irritating as hauling in heavy PA speakers with a bad back while some idiot half my age sits there and watches...usually with a beer in his hand...

Again, some excellent points guys, I hope a lot of the beginners see this and read it and PAY ATTENTION...

In fact I think it should be a sticky.

12joey.c12
12-30-2007, 03:49 PM
Hey people ta for the advice, very useful. I have one problem, our drummer is really good and we practise in his outdoor open garage/shed thing, but lately hes been saying wed have a practise and then not having one, he's done this several times and me and the bass player ( we are a three peice) are getting sick and fed up, yet we want to be in a band and the drummer is really good. What should we do?

JackFlash19
12-30-2007, 07:14 PM
^ sit him down and ask him why he keeps doing that. I'll excuse everything as long as they give me an honest legit reason. Ask him how serious he is about the band, maybe sit down and write out some goals you would like to achieve and discuss the steps needed to get there. Alot of the stuff you may think can go unsaid between band members probably shouldn't. Also if you write out your goals on paper it, in effect, helps to materialize them and make them seem more achievable. Hang them up in your band practice space on the wall in big letter by the door so you see it every time you leave.


In fact I think it should be a sticky.

nice post. You don't usually think metal bands like other kinds of music sometime, but you never know. LOL I was reading through and thought it should be stickied also. I was about to write it when I got to the end of your post, so I'll just do x2 ;)

R.I.P.Jimi
12-30-2007, 11:33 PM
Thanks. I'm new to guitar, but eventually when I can play some decent material I want to start a band, adn this has really helped me. And am I correct in that the audience, club etc. doesn't expect the best from new bands, and that you won't be flamed for not beign the best?

Zeelod
12-31-2007, 02:59 AM
Thanks. I'm new to guitar, but eventually when I can play some decent material I want to start a band, adn this has really helped me. And am I correct in that the audience, club etc. doesn't expect the best from new bands, and that you won't be flamed for not beign the best?


Well, it's fair to say that they don't expect anything out of you when you're a new band, in fact they won't care at all really that you're new

You could also argue that the age of the band doesn't really matter. If the band is good and makes good songs then the people will like. If the band sucks and can't make a good song then the people will think, well, they will think nothing of you except, "Well, there goes another mediocre band" and nothing much else.

In my experience and opinion, no one cares how long the band has been together, it's about the quality of the music that will hit them.

Paleo Pete
12-31-2007, 09:39 AM
I'll agree with that, audiences generally don't expect a new band (if they know it's a new band) to be phenomenal, but you don't want to go out there and suck out loud either. Your first few gigs will be rough around the edges, especially if everyone in the band is doing their first gigging band scene, you'll find out things you never expected concerning equipment and sound quality, as well as playing live itself as opposed to rehearsals. It's an entirely different scenario and atmosphere. I've never had much trouble, I've been playing live since I was 9 or 10, but a lot of people get stage fright, some so bad they actually get nauseated and throw up. Others just get a case of "butterflies"...nervous, anxious, a bit scared maybe...

That's the reason for the advice earlier in this thread to make sure you have spare cords, power strips, things like that. I don't know how many times I've had to solder someone's guitar or bass cable 10 minutes before a gig because they stepped on it the night before or it got yanked when someone tripped on it, and don't have a spare. I've done it myself when I didn't know my spare wasn't with me. Now it all stays in a gig bag. I even keep a spare guitar tuner handy if my battery goes dead or someone else needs one.

Then you'll find some songs that sound great in the practice room are empty onstage in a larger building, some don't get the audience's attention, someone is so nervous he can barely play at all, much less play well, there are a dozen things that can go wrong and ruin your gig.

And stay on top of tuning. 2 degrees temperature change and you're out of tune. Don't even bother tuning up until your guitars and basses have been in the room for at least a half hour to come to room temp, especially if it's really cold. I give mine an hour. Then you have the chance it also might crack the finish if you open it up in a warm room when it's been in a freezing trailer for 3 hours. I've played under AC vents, I freeze and my guitars stay in tune about 30 seconds after the AC comes on. No staying in tune then, it's a huge mess and you sound horrible.

So be prepared, if you're new to playing and gigging, no the audience doesn't expect you to be great, but they do expect you to at least play some good music they can get into and have it polished enough to sound decent. If you're not ready and your band sucks, you won't get many gigs. If you sound decent, you may get a little leeway if the audience knows it's a new band. But have it together as well as possible before trying to gig.

axemanchris
12-31-2007, 11:35 AM
The audience won't know you're a new band unless you tell them.

If you're good the audience is happy. If you suck - new or not - the audience will not be pleased. They could be doing other things - watching CSI, getting laid, doing laundry, whatever. They chose to go out and see music. Don't disappoint.

CT

Tsucchi
12-31-2007, 03:18 PM
The SADDEST thing to see on stage is a band that keeps apologizing. Some new band that played before mine started off saying "Hi, we're new and we kinda suck and don't know the words so if you don't like us that's why," and after each song finished with, "Yeah... sorry I told you we don't really know what we're doing."

Not only does that turn off the audience immediately, but makes it harder for the next band to get the crowd going so they have to work TWICE as hard because of the bunch before them. Best thing is confidence and having a :) on, because even if you mess up if you look like you're having fun everyone else will have a good time too.

cjb2293
12-31-2007, 04:50 PM
A thing i know that can also annoy bands at a gig is when people don't help set up equipment! it might take a few minutes to set up an amp and pedal board by yourself, but if you don't help with the drums it could take a while and will take away from your playing time. Also some amps can be pretty heavy so make sure you help each other when setting up. Help each other when you take your equipment off-stage too so you can get it off fast and the next band can get on.

JackFlash19
01-01-2008, 08:05 PM
Oh yea, forgot. ALWAYS have brand new 9volt batteries in your gig bag. Several of them. Sometimes the band before or after you will need one, and they will thank you bc you just saved their life. Regardless of how much or little I use my tuner pedal, I always replace the battery about every 4-5 shows. Nothing worse than having a tuner pedal battery go down and you think you are in tune when you are not. (my ear is good, but not great for tuning :( )

Tubyboulin
01-01-2008, 08:14 PM
Deffinitly Get this like Stickied as "THE ONLY NEW BAND Q+A THREAD!"

great advice in here. im just starting up a band with a few buddies of mine, and a lot of this advice is gonna come in Handy!

rhoads4ever
01-02-2008, 11:26 AM
Oh yea, forgot. ALWAYS have brand new 9volt batteries in your gig bag. Several of them. Sometimes the band before or after you will need one, and they will thank you bc you just saved their life. Regardless of how much or little I use my tuner pedal, I always replace the battery about every 4-5 shows. Nothing worse than having a tuner pedal battery go down and you think you are in tune when you are not. (my ear is good, but not great for tuning :( )
That goes for everything. Always have an extra cable, batteries, picks, strings etc. have a small tool set with screwdrivers, pliers etc. as well, you have no idea how many times I've helped myself and others with this stuff.

slavehack
01-02-2008, 08:56 PM
GET A PUREVOLUME PAGE!!

I cannot stress this enough. These things are for the people who don't want to look through all of this myspace crap. They can read up on when you have shows, and can look at pictures and listen to your music.

www.purevolume.com

It's how my band started getting our name out there.

R.I.P.Jimi
01-02-2008, 10:01 PM
Thanks for all the replies, a great and helpful thread. no, i don't have a band yet, but i just wanna know when I do. Yeah, Confidence is important, i hate it when people keep on apoligizing, l like just get the **** going. Thanks guys!!!!!

Paleo Pete
01-04-2008, 08:14 AM
Tsucchi had a good point, don't apologise all night, tell the audience ONCE we're a new band, if we make a mistake here and there, please bear with us, then shut up. Play your ass off, and try to be prepared to begin with so if you're not great, at least you don't suck out loud...

Don't say we kinda suck,we're not that good, or any such thing, just something like what I posted above and leave it at that, let them know you're new and you may be a bit rough around the edges, but don't put yourselves down or apologise all night. Most of all, be confident...and don't even think about bringing attention to mistakes, ignore them. If it's really bad and stops the song, try and make a joke of it. Get a laugh out of it, and let people know you can see some humor in it if nothing else...but I really hope you don't have to endure that humiliating scene...I have...

axemanchris
01-04-2008, 09:23 AM
If it's really bad and stops the song, try and make a joke of it. Get a laugh out of it, and let people know you can see some humor in it if nothing else...but I really hope you don't have to endure that humiliating scene...I have...

I bet all of us have at some point..... or at least come close to it. I don't remember ever having to stop a song at a gig, but I won't say it has never happened. I DO remember some real train wrecks where everyone just kinda lumbered along faking it as best they could to avoid stopping, while everything around us just kinda went to hell. Neither the audience nor the band had any idea what was going on on stage. :lol: Sh!t happens to everybody. The difference between a pro and an amateur is how they deal with it.

CT

axemanchris
01-04-2008, 09:30 AM
Tsucchi had a good point, don't apologise all night, tell the audience ONCE we're a new band, if we make a mistake here and there, please bear with us, then shut up.

And if you have a couple of rough spots, that's fine. If you have rough spots all over the place and you feel compelled to spend the night apologizing to the audience, you really shouldn't be gigging in the first place.

If it is going that badly, pick the best song you haven't done yet and cut your set short. End on a good note, and have the audience thinking, "they were okay for a new band.... too bad they only played three songs" instead of having the audience thinking

"Jesus, these guys suck. How much longer are they going to play. I think I left something out in the car. I'll be back in 20 minutes. Actually, let's go next door and get something to eat. Are they done yet? No?! Awww... man......

....

Holy crap.... they're finally done! Someone should have gotten the hook long ago. Who were they anyways? They're called Dream Theatre, you say? Geez, I'll have to remember to NEVER go see THEM again! In fact, next time we go out, let's just go see a movie or go to a dance club or something where we know the music will be good. :( "

Remember, your audience isn't there to pat your back and tell you you're great. Your audience gave up something else to come out and see live music. In this day and age, that's awesome in itself. Please, for all of our sakes, don't make them regret they did.

CT

epiplayer13
01-05-2008, 12:59 AM
awesome advice not only for young or new musicians. i run a small venue adn i work with the bands pretty close. there are some i dont like as people but i still let them play even tho if sounded that way i would never stand in front of a crowd.. teh only thing i can add.

please please please from a promoter and supports standpoint. be ready dont show up for your first show ever or first show as a new band adn have 4 song kinda ready. if you have 4 songs or stuff better be tight. and if it isnt dont bother gigging yet get it together. i wont play a show with a band until we havea minimum of 10 songs ready and tight. we may not play them all but there there in reserve if we need them what if some one cancels and we get more stage time what if someone requests and you all know it