Frustrated - is age a barrier?


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Imafrog
12-20-2007, 06:03 AM
:) :) I have a queastion for the seaoned giggers out there. Im only 14 right, but have done a couple of gigs - all covers, which i think is okay going... but I really want to take my original band and develop it and start giging a little, opening for friends bands and stuff. I will approach it purely as a bit of fun that won't last and experience...and that is my question.

As much as i hate it, 14 seems to be WAY to early to start anything that you can expect to last... and everything I do will be purely for experience for later. say if my band got 12 GOOD originals down... we couldn't record and tour at 15 or 16! We would have to wait years till we were 18 or older ( to be taken seriously and play at good places!) to make a break thruogh. So I find it hard to cmmit and take seriously an originals band right now, when it is almost garenteed that we will try to go to quickly and maybe even record at a free studio (there are plenty here) a crappy LP when we are 15 and ruin it for a 'proper" debut album. Do you agree? My view is that at my age, an original band opening for my friends slightly more advanced ones would be for gigging experience and fun, nothing that would or could last or go anywere, but still valuable. because lets face it... you just can't be taken seriously and its not like the band will last long enough or be patient enought to hold material for the 4 or 5 years till we are 18 - 19 to 'do it properly"! If I wanna take something further later in my life, I will get it goin in yr 12 or at uni I think! Agree? Any ways to get good exposure and experience on a local level at a young age? Do you agree that i should have no expectations tha it will last?

jazz_croatia
12-20-2007, 06:11 AM
I agree with you saying that you should wait for some time until you record something just because of the experience you gain during your playing years. The best way of exposure? You should try and play as many local pubs clubs and similar things. People love a good cover band. And if you get noticed you can get gigs on a weekly or monthly basis and earn some money. But don't think of your age as a barrier. I've got a few friends that recorded their debut albums at 16 and 17 years old and it has been quite successful. And you should try it to make last as long as it can. It's all up to you.

ipSprite
12-20-2007, 06:13 AM
don't rule it out, one of Paramore's members (cent remember) had to have school work sent to him on tour as he wasn't old enough to leave but the school recognised he had a real opportunity or summat.
so good luck

-xCaMRocKx-
12-20-2007, 06:33 AM
i like to think of silverchair. debut album out at 14, and now nearly 13 years later they're still pretty much the biggest thing in aus.

just something to think about...


but yeah, not being taken seriously because of your age sucks. dont worry though, you grow out of it ;)

livefastdiefun
12-20-2007, 07:02 AM
yeah man, my friend nearly missed his prom when he was 16 cause of a huuge gig, then played Reading Festival 3 months later.

check em out www.myspace.com/killthearcade

but yeah dont be too disheartened, just keep it up! :) x

Iron Sabbath
12-20-2007, 09:56 AM
i think after 13 giging can be an option. there are many bands out there of kids areound 12-15 going out and playing, heck look at the disney channel...hahhaha. Its a fun expierince and you cant really grasp the knoledge of giging untill its been an ongoing thing. Definitly have a set down before going on, even if it is the same every time for a while (i went through that). Best of luck

SlackerBabbath
12-20-2007, 10:18 AM
I started gigging at 16 without any trouble.
My band, Slack Babbath, (a Sabbath tribute) run a mini festival every August called Quazfest (Like Ozzfest, only my stage name is Quazi Washboard. see? :D ) and last August we had a young band called Rapid Fire on the bill. They did a couple of Metallica covers and a couple of Judas Priest covers and a couple of Iron Maiden covers, and they did them very well, but what was amazing about them was their age.
The drummer was 9 ( :eek: ) and the rest of them averaged out at around 12 or 13.
These guys got one of the biggest cheers of the day and gained a hell of a lot of respect from a much older audience.

My advice would be to record and play gigs at every available opportunity and stick with it, then once you're an adult, you'll have a huge advantage over most of the other bands around as you'll be old hands at it by then

axemanchris
12-20-2007, 08:40 PM
i like to think of silverchair. debut album out at 14, and now nearly 13 years later they're still pretty much the biggest thing in aus.



And with each album (you know.... as they get older...), they just keep getting better. :D

If you want to "make it" in the industry, you're never too young to start sharpening your skills. Gigging experience is good. Getting your chops up is good.

But more important than anything....
1. Developing connections. Meet who you can. You never know who will be able to help you later. That geeky kid in the AV club at school? He/She could be the next programming director for ClearChannel. Who knows, eh? Treat people well, and make sure they remember you and respect you.

2. Nobody goes anywhere without good songs. You're writing now. Good. Keep doing it. Before you release your first "official" album, you might find yourself with 2, 3, 5, or even 10 years of original songs. Out of all those songs, many of them will die a quiet death under the "I thought it was good when I was 15" category. The odd one here and there, though, will keep going - like a loyal friend - and never seem to lose their value. Those will be your keepers.

CT

Imafrog
12-20-2007, 09:44 PM
cool, thanks guys!

Dunjma
12-21-2007, 06:45 AM
in my opinion if you have good original songs why not get em on a cd to sell to people at gigs?
you'll get some money out of your hard work and its far more likely that people will remember you later on down the track.

p.s. love ur sig Imafrog

Sonic Blast
12-22-2007, 03:14 PM
I'm in the same sort of situation you are in. I'm 15, but there aren't really many places to gig where I live. You've just got to stick with it. And recording can take a long time. I do all of my recording at home and it's a blast. And you should start giging now so when you are older you have that experience. And get all of your origonals and thoughts and riffs down now because when you come back to them they might fit in exactly with what you are thinking of then even though they might seem like crap now. just stick with it. you'll love it all

wyldeshredder
12-23-2007, 11:12 PM
im 14 and my band focuses mainly on original material. writing your own tunes will only make you a better player. i write many,many songs that i work on with my drummer (who is a key part of our writing process) lots of these songs get chucked. because,they sound young,inexperienced,ect...but every once in a while i really hone in and come out with a really great song. if you start writing now, you may not have an album's worth of material by the time your 15 or 16. just write,get some experience under your belt, and stick with some original songs that make a lasting impression on you. play with them as much as you can,sometimes it takes a year before songs are in their final form. i guess im saying not to limit yourself because of your age. start writing and hone your skills as a songwriter, dont wait. you've got the time on your hands now,that you wont have when your 20,working full time, trying to make a fair dollar for yourself,aswell as trying to run a band. hope this helps

wyldeshredder
12-23-2007, 11:20 PM
and on the note of being taken seriously. it is very possible. as long as you can really play. my band opened for two fairly popular bands friday night. each has some radio airplay. we were taken quite seriously. we played 4 originals and a cover of the calling by santana. we finished the show with an original with a really fast harmonized solo at the end,and it really opened peoples eyes. there was only 60 people there,but i think we made a good impression on them. try not to blend in with every other band. try to create hooks in your songs. my band plays metal,although we have a reggae section in 1 tune...just go for it,get ur name it,even if u dont last,get some experience...good luck

rhoads4ever
12-24-2007, 03:06 PM
I remember gigging in high school. We played to older crowds and it was funny because people would have rock bottom expectations for us, so we never really disappointed. People always were impressed how seriously we took it. As long as you set yourselves and carry your selves like adults, and don't treat it like a high school football game, you'll do alright. And you learn a hell of a lot.

take_it_t
12-24-2007, 03:20 PM
Its all part of the learning experience. You can only get good at writing by doing it, everyone has to start somewhere. Just start writing music, theres no reason for you to hold off till your older to start writing music.

hurlyz
12-24-2007, 04:52 PM
Children of Bodom released 'Something Wild' (their first album) when they were 15~16 I believe... ;) :D

dream-thief
12-26-2007, 11:36 AM
I'm only 15 and my band are hitting the studios next week to record a 4 track demo.

The problem is we live far apart so we haven't played any gigs yet, but I hope age wont be a problem when we're trying to get them, As I'm not the youngest in the band, although the singer is 22....

outlaw metaler
12-26-2007, 07:29 PM
just play dude screw how old you are

epiplayer13
12-27-2007, 01:20 AM
at 34 i refuse to play in a band w/ anyone under 21 not that there not talented or good enough. on the contrary i have met some incredible musicians some better than me. however i refuse to bring a kid into the world of a full on club or bar gig and the lifestyle that goes with it. its just irresponsible. i do sponsor a venue where younger bands are showcased every couple of weeks in my town and do what i can to support them but to bring them into the dirty world of "rockstar parties" and crap no way plua i hate dealing with parents and school and crap like that i need to be around adults

SlackerBabbath
12-27-2007, 08:54 AM
^ At 41 I've introduced quite a few young bands and young musicians to the club scene, (by giving them supporting slots with my own band) and made sure they were well looked after while they were at the venue. (which is easy, you just make sure they bring their parents with them)
Yes, they may see the odd drunken adult, (but hey, they can see those in the street every day) but we don't actualy have that many 'rock stars' who have 'parties' around here that could be a bad influence on them.

electricnightma
12-27-2007, 09:18 AM
my bands restricted to play many venues coz of the same think bud, your not alone.

rhoads4ever
12-27-2007, 12:19 PM
^ At 41 I've introduced quite a few young bands and young musicians to the club scene, (by giving them supporting slots with my own band) and made sure they were well looked after while they were at the venue. (which is easy, you just make sure they bring their parents with them)
Yes, they may see the odd drunken adult, (but hey, they can see those in the street every day) but we don't actualy have that many 'rock stars' who have 'parties' around here that could be a bad influence on them.
+1 and there are those things, but there's a difference between being in a band, and getting caught up in that stuff. I think its better sometimes to show what happens when you take all that partying etc. to the max, and make it your life. I can't tell you how many losers I see at show etc. that remind me what a lifetime of substance abuse can do.

Gurgle!Argh!
12-27-2007, 12:44 PM
threadstarter: listen to and read about commander venus.

epiplayer13
12-27-2007, 03:15 PM
+1 and there are those things, but there's a difference between being in a band, and getting caught up in that stuff. I think its better sometimes to show what happens when you take all that partying etc. to the max, and make it your life. I can't tell you how many losers I see at show etc. that remind me what a lifetime of substance abuse can do.

I quite agree with you but the fact remains if a child goes into a club at 14 they are very impressionable. Its not just me there are looking at. I dont let my own children come to the shows i play in bars. I have a special place. like i said in my church every other sasturday i host a small show and give any young band in my area a place to play without all the drugs and alcohol around they can play for there friends and get a feel for playing for a crowd and my older friends enjoy watching them as well and we give them tips and pointers on how to play and work the crows and such they all love to play there. plus we get to tell them what to look out for when the time comes and they do start to play in bars and scenes around here. Houston is a big town and close to Austin we have plenty of "rock stars" most are wannabes i admit but they get these kids all starry eyed and then set really bad examples. at least as an adult i am not so easily swayed i can go into a bar and not be tempted to party it up and ruin a show or my life but how can you think a 14 or 15 yr old at such an impressionable time in there lives will be ok they have really only heard the stories and gotten mtv ideas of how cool it is to be a rock star. are there exceptions to this yes, but not enough to sway my opinion and let me take a minor into that.

JackFlash19
12-28-2007, 06:12 AM
look at minority. They are huge and are like 15

axemanchris
12-28-2007, 10:36 AM
look at minority. They are huge and are like 15

At that age, though, most would still consider you a "child star." (not that a band like them really qualifies as "stars" but whatever....)

I think what Slacker and Epiplayer, etc. are saying is important. Look what happens to many, if not most of your child stars: Michael Jackson, Brittney Spears, etc. They spend their childhood/impressionable teen years in the spotlight, un-equipped to deal with that kind of a lifestyle, and then wonder why they're so screwed up at the end of it. Michael Jackson is my favourite example, because he has *never* been "allowed" to be normal, nor has he really had the chance to learn. No bloody wonder he's a bizarre individual!

At the best of times, with the strongest of people, there are people looking to influence you, or at least screw you over somehow, or at least just make you look bad because of some ill-natured competitive streak or what-have-you. Kids are seen as easy targets.

CT

rhoads4ever
12-28-2007, 10:44 AM
I quite agree with you but the fact remains if a child goes into a club at 14 they are very impressionable. Its not just me there are looking at. I dont let my own children come to the shows i play in bars. I have a special place. like i said in my church every other sasturday i host a small show and give any young band in my area a place to play without all the drugs and alcohol around they can play for there friends and get a feel for playing for a crowd and my older friends enjoy watching them as well and we give them tips and pointers on how to play and work the crows and such they all love to play there. plus we get to tell them what to look out for when the time comes and they do start to play in bars and scenes around here. Houston is a big town and close to Austin we have plenty of "rock stars" most are wannabes i admit but they get these kids all starry eyed and then set really bad examples. at least as an adult i am not so easily swayed i can go into a bar and not be tempted to party it up and ruin a show or my life but how can you think a 14 or 15 yr old at such an impressionable time in there lives will be ok they have really only heard the stories and gotten mtv ideas of how cool it is to be a rock star. are there exceptions to this yes, but not enough to sway my opinion and let me take a minor into that.

I can understand that. I don't agree with sheltering people and not helping them do what they want or become what they want, but I know why you try and keep them away.

EDIT: to the post above me, I understand but I also think thats more of an "extreme" look on things, The likelyhood of starting band when you're 14 or 15 then hitting it "big" before you're 18 is slim to none you know?

axemanchris
12-28-2007, 11:37 AM
EDIT: to the post above me, I understand but I also think thats more of an "extreme" look on things, The likelyhood of starting band when you're 14 or 15 then hitting it "big" before you're 18 is slim to none you know?

Most definitely. It was just that the post I quoted was talking about a band making it sort of big when they were 15.

CT

rhoads4ever
12-28-2007, 11:38 AM
Oh yeah I'm an idiot sorry.

SlackerBabbath
12-28-2007, 12:32 PM
I quite agree with you but the fact remains if a child goes into a club at 14 they are very impressionable. Its not just me there are looking at. I dont let my own children come to the shows i play in bars. I have a special place. like i said in my church every other sasturday i host a small show and give any young band in my area a place to play without all the drugs and alcohol around they can play for there friends and get a feel for playing for a crowd and my older friends enjoy watching them as well and we give them tips and pointers on how to play and work the crows and such they all love to play there. plus we get to tell them what to look out for when the time comes and they do start to play in bars and scenes around here. Houston is a big town and close to Austin we have plenty of "rock stars" most are wannabes i admit but they get these kids all starry eyed and then set really bad examples. at least as an adult i am not so easily swayed i can go into a bar and not be tempted to party it up and ruin a show or my life but how can you think a 14 or 15 yr old at such an impressionable time in there lives will be ok they have really only heard the stories and gotten mtv ideas of how cool it is to be a rock star. are there exceptions to this yes, but not enough to sway my opinion and let me take a minor into that.
Where I live, the kids sell drugs on street corners.
The way I see it, if I can encourage some kids to turn away from that kinda lifestyle and encourage them to place their efforts into becoming a musician instead, then that's gotta be a good thing. And if I can encourage some kids to put a band together and be dedicated enough to organise themselves and rehearse a set until it's gig ready, then I'm kinda being a bastard if I don't deliver that gig. Once at the gig, you just kinda take 'em under your wing, be a good influence, show 'em how 'the professionals' do it, and even tell them a few nighmare stories of what happens to bands and musicians that don't stay clean, because all us older musicians know of someone like that.

rhoads4ever
12-28-2007, 01:52 PM
Slacker is right again. Its like those parents that just keep telling their kid "no" or shelter their kids for their whole high school and don't let them go out, party, etc. Eventually the kid graduates, and the 14 year old musicians turn 21, and have unlimited access. Isn't it better to guide them and show them how bad this really can be? I'm sick of meeting the moron who threw all his talent and life away for a cheap high, you know? I'm not against rock and roll partying, but everything sucks in excess. Don't be the sheltering parent.

chrisb12416
12-28-2007, 01:56 PM
Age is a huge influence.

And im a complete hypocrit. Because i don't like to see kid's playin metal and screaming and ****.. i won't look twice at bands doing that.. all the metal bands i like are in their 30's or older...










I'm 15. lol.

Symmetry4321
12-28-2007, 02:03 PM
I'm in a band with another 17 year old, a 16 year old a 15 year old and a 14 year old. We don't have that many songs but we are starting to pick up gigs with more and more frequency (although none booked for next year as of yet) and we have some truly hardcore fans (so hardcore that a few of them have covered 2 of our songs). We are all quite responsible people as in we won't try any of the drinking or drugs stuff at venues so thats not really the problem.

If you want to go for it in terms of making it young then we are in the same boat so go for it and hope to see your bands name up in lights one day (cliche i know)