Rythm guitar


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beatlesgrl234
01-02-2008, 06:57 PM
What should one know to be a rythm guitarist in a rock band?

Doodleface
01-02-2008, 07:01 PM
different voicings of chords
not to show off
sometimes not playing is more powerful than playing.

gallagher2006
01-02-2008, 07:04 PM
Power Chords
Basic Open Chords
How not to try and steal spotlight
How to count a beat

Should do fine.

BobMarleysGhost
01-02-2008, 07:05 PM
Learn solos.

ortrigger
01-02-2008, 07:07 PM
all kinds of chords, basic scales, keeping the rhythm (duh), to not steal attention from the vocals and lead guitar, theory. probably more but i don't want to type anymore.

Dishburn
01-02-2008, 07:14 PM
Bealtesgrl,

Learn to drive a van and carry the heavy stuff... Just Kidding.

Doodle is right. It's really an underrated position. Practice until you can play really tight and anticipate the changes. Rhythm guitar's are very important for that layered sound. Good Luck.

Dish

beatlesgrl234
01-02-2008, 07:18 PM
Thanks for all your advice, it's been really helpful.

kumamilesbear
01-02-2008, 11:30 PM
yes, yes, basic open chords and power chords...
WRONG
ALL OPEN CHORDS, power chords, ALL BAR CHORDS, ALL NON-BAR, NON-OPEN, NON-POWER chords. counting in your head, keeping your rhythm tight and clean.
personally, i always play rhythm guitar when i play guitar, cuz i cant play lead worth a ****.

Mockingbird452
01-03-2008, 04:18 AM
Okay, this may be a stupid question, but when I read these Rythm Guitar Threads, I always see: Keep the Rhythm, and count the beat...

I dont really get how the rhythm guitarist needs to count the beat, can somebody tell me. I do know that they shouldn't do anything flashy, but thats about it.

VIRUSDETECTED
01-03-2008, 05:13 AM
Okay, this may be a stupid question, but when I read these Rythm Guitar Threads, I always see: Keep the Rhythm, and count the beat...

I dont really get how the rhythm guitarist needs to count the beat, can somebody tell me. I do know that they shouldn't do anything flashy, but thats about it.


Because if the rhythm guitar and the lead guitar go off-sync it sounds like a cat in a blender.

Matt Chavie
01-03-2008, 05:17 AM
They're saying that you are a fancier bassist. As in you play a steady string of notes/chords, and act as a backing track to the lead guitar. You act as a piece of paper for him to draw all over.

felixdcat
01-03-2008, 05:23 AM
It's hard. You mustnt get carried away with the vocals. Just shut your ears and work like a clock. And learn how to construct any chord :)

henza_x
01-03-2008, 05:24 AM
Keeping the beat with strumming and keeping the same strummin gpattern in a song.

I sometimes change it up, without noticing it and its really a bad habit. I mean, it stays in time perfectly fine but it should subconscious that it repeats.

And not important depending on genre, but triplets help.

cortez0
01-03-2008, 06:04 AM
keeping the beat in a band isn't that hard, just follow the drums.

Learn a lot of rythm patterns and some theory this way if your lead says: I want to jam in C, you can make a rythm right on the spot.

Feel bad inc.
01-03-2008, 07:55 AM
Learn basic open chords and power chords. Basic bar chords to. You dont need a huge amount of chords for most rock bands tho. Also I would suggest theory, also learn some lead guitar parts so you can relate to your lead guitarist, this is very important to at least know some lead...

Paleo Pete
01-03-2008, 10:09 AM
Most of it has already been covered, good job guys.

As for the question about counting...I don't consciously count 1,2,3,4 any more, it's automatically there in my head, but you need to know when the chord progression changes, and you need to know when the lead comes in, and vocals, so you can follow the dynamics of the song. It always gets a bit louder during leads, quieter during the verses, play accordingly. And if the lead player wants to drop back and play some laid back, quiet stuff, be ready to drop your volume accordingly.

Here's where being able to count comes in...if you stop to work out the details of a song and the band wants some emphasis on a certain chord and says right here on 2, you need to know which beat 2 is.

In general though, it's just to be able to keep in time and keep your place in the song.

As far as general advice, I think it's mostly been covered. Follow the dynamics, blend in, know your chords and chord progressions, be able to lock into what the bass and drums are doing and stay there. It's not called a rhythm section for nothing...

Learn to play clean and distorted, and keep the volume level down while distorted so the lead guitar can come out on top and be heard. That goes along with working with the dynamics. Stay on top of your tuning, you'll be playing chords all night and one instrument out of tune ruins everything. It's more noticeable with chords than with leads.

For a rock band, your most common sound will probably be a slightly overdriven clean sound, work with your amp and effects until you can peg it every time. My favorite rhythm sound is a low wattage (30 or less ) tube amp cranked to 10. Fender Princeton or Peavey Classic 30 should be great, I've played alongside a Princeton, guitar and amp was all the guy needed.

Be steady as a rock. Practice with a metronome so you can develop good timing, lock into a rhythm part and don't let go even if the neighbor's dog starts yanking on your pants leg.

A good rhythm player is very difficult to find, most people can't resist the urge to show off and try and play lead. That's the main reason I stay away from two guitar bands, it's just too much hassle getting them to work together instead of turning it into a guitar battle. If you can be the best rhythm player in town, every band in town will be looking for you.

Mockingbird452
01-03-2008, 04:17 PM
Okay, I'm starting to see what a good Rhythm Guitarist does now. I was listening to some songs last night at like 1 ( :rolleyes: ) and I figured out why counting is important.

As for one more thing, when I listen to some live performences, I BARELY hear the Rhythm Guitar, but in their ear monitors, could they hear themselves fine? :confused:

Thanks, again.

Paleo Pete
01-04-2008, 08:01 AM
As for one more thing, when I listen to some live performences, I BARELY hear the Rhythm Guitar, but in their ear monitors, could they hear themselves fine?

Usually yes, and in fact a lot of the time they hear themselves fine without the ear monitors, the stage mix is not what you hear out front, it goes through the PA first and most sound guys mix the rhythm guitar too low to suit me, I think it should be heard, but not loud enough to be annoying or detract from the lead or vocals.

It depends on how you set up. If you don't mic your amps, monitors only carry vocals, and the amps have to carry the sound, and if you can't hear your amp you're out of luck. I've only played in one bar band that ran everything through the PA and that was because we all wanted GOOD sound quality out front and had a sound guy who could get it, he was an audio nut, wanted it to sound just like listening to the album, but louder. He got it.

We didn't run any guitars back through the monitors, didn't need to since we could all hear our own amps and each other. Many profressional bands run everything into the PA and back through the monitors, so in reality you could show up with a 10 watt practice amp and play in the Astrodome. Just run it through the monitors.

Usually you won't be doing that though, so you'll need a guitar amp with enough power to hold its own onstage, usually 30 watts (tubes) or more, twice that if you run a solid state amp. Tube amps do sound better, I'll never own another solid state again. The trick with rhythm guitar is to get your volume level so you can hear it, and blend with the band too, without drowning out the lead guitar or overpowering the vocals, That takes attention to your sound and volume level, and being able to work with the dynamics of a song. With the band I mentioned above I could whisper into the mic and you could hear it out front, we were that particular. We used dynamics a lot, dropping the volume way down sometimes, so I or the other guitar player could do those really quiet licks you hear sometimes, then pushing it to all out for a rocking song, especially to close out a set or the night. When you drop it back to really quiet, the rhythm guitar has to still be there and not overpower the lead...that takes practice, it's not as easy to do as you might think, and it's one of the reasons a top notch rhythm player is worth his or her weight in gold.

So, when you see live performances, the ear monitors or wedge type in front of the band, are always for vocals, and whether they also carry the instruments depends on how the band sets up. If you don't see mics in front of the guitar amps' speakers, it's only vocals in the monitors, they depend on the amps to get the onstage volume. In both cases, yes, you should be able to hear yourself.