The Blues scale (major, minor)


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blink+guitar
01-23-2008, 07:54 PM
ok well i was under the impression that their was only one blues scale and it was deprived from the minor pentatonic scale with a added b5.and that this blues scale is considered thhe blues scale, as in their was only one, becuase the blues scale contains notes from the two parent scales in the key ( E blues scale contains notes from E major and E minor). and that you can play this blues scale over minor or major blues forms.

BUT when i was in the muso talk forum they where talking about how you use the minor blues scale over minor blues forms and the major blues scales over major blues forms.

So i looked up the major blues scale and i believe the intervals were 1 2 3 b5 5 6, which doesnt make sense to me becuase i thought the reason the blues scale sounds 'bluesy' (other then the fact the way you play it and feel it) was becuase of the blue notes like b3 and b7. and this major blues scale looks to be made from the major pentatonic with the added b5 again.

so could someone please tell me how this works and what should i be playing over what.


thanks

gopherthegreat
01-23-2008, 09:15 PM
it sounds like a happier blues scale.

that extra note sounds bluesy. thats pretty much it, i think.

blink+guitar
01-23-2008, 09:16 PM
no i mean are you sopposed to play major over major and minor over minor or can you mix it up a bit.

gopherthegreat
01-23-2008, 09:18 PM
no i mean are you sopposed to play major over major and minor over minor or can you mix it up a bit.
play the major scale over major keys, and minor scale over minor keys. but you can also use the minor scale over major keys if its appropriate. in my opinion, using the major scale over minor keys just sounds out of place, though.

i hope you could follow that :haha

blink+guitar
01-23-2008, 11:06 PM
^ yer probably becuase it doesnt contain notes from both the parent major and minor keys like i said before

SuburbanCowboy
01-24-2008, 12:59 PM
no i mean are you sopposed to play major over major and minor over minor or can you mix it up a bit.

Mix it up as much as you can while staying true to the feel of the song. Try building up some "tension" with minor key licks, then "resolve" it with a major key lick. Or you can do the opposite. The idea is to get the right balance of sweetness and grit. You want to keep listeners interested, as well as yourself. :cheers:

browar
01-25-2008, 06:18 PM
Isn't the major blues scale:1 2 b3 3 5 6?

blink+guitar
01-25-2008, 09:46 PM
Isn't the major blues scale:1 2 b3 3 5 6?

no, becuase its the major pentatonic scale with the added b5, heres a link if you want to check out the major blues scale: http://12bar.de/scale_generator.php

TNfootballfan62
01-25-2008, 10:51 PM
I always try to mix in the major and minor scales when i can. It doesn't work as well for me over minor blues as it does for major blues, but mixing provides some great tension and release.

GD_GC
01-27-2008, 03:40 PM
OK basically the whole idea of the blues is playing the minor based blues scale over the major chords. This provides that "bluesy" sound we all know and love so much. The deal with the major pentatonic is that it is notes from the major scale of whatever key you are in. If you play this scale, it will give you a southern rock, almost Allman Brothers like sound. A lot of blues musicians mix the 2, and I've found that if you really want to make it sound the "bluesyist," you need to rely a lot more on the minor than the major, and only through in the major for color. If you rely all the way on the major, it will start to sound more Southern rockish then blues, but that isn't necessarily a bad thing, and if thats the sound you want, go for it!

Just a heads up, all of that was pertaining to major chord progressions and such. If it is a minor chord progression, stick only with the minor pentatonic/blues scale, and possibly the Dorian mode, which contains some of the same notes as the major pentatonic, but is a minor scale. Using the major pent. over minor chords will not work, but using minor pent. over major chords = that bluesy sound we all love.

I hope that helps, I was kind of just rambling there, but it makes sense in my own mind :p:

blink+guitar
01-27-2008, 10:49 PM
^ yer GD_GC thats what i gathered after i messed around with the major blues scale. i hadn't tried the dorian mode over minor blues, im going tp now. thanks guys!

INDUSTRIALMETAL
01-27-2008, 10:56 PM
You could also mess around with the Relative keys. So a C Major Blues Lick in a A minor setting could yield interesting results.

TheDev01dOne
01-29-2008, 06:46 PM
I always use 1 scale so I assume I'm missing one..

Can someone make a map of the 2 different scales for me? So I can see what he difference is?

Also I know a guy who is amazing at using Major relative keys for blues solos. Sound great when it's done right but it's really hard and just sounds like **** if you screw up IMO.

GD_GC
01-29-2008, 06:50 PM
Well the major pentatonic is the minor pentatonic, same boxes and stuff. Just start the box a minor 3rd BELOW whatever the tonic is and there you go. You will quickly be able to discover what notes work better than others in the scale though.

BluesLP1990
01-30-2008, 08:33 PM
alright, so i'm going to sound like an old fart. but hear me out. You're not going to learn how to play the blues well, or get a blues sound by looking up scale definitions on the internet. You've got to listen to a lot and watch some fingers closely if you can.
Here's the deal:

-Over any blues song (major, minor, dominant, whatever) you can use the minor pentatonic til your G string breaks or the drummers arms fall off.
"blue" notes sound best in conjunction with the minor pen. Lots of notes can be blue notes, you just have to find them. The b5 is most common because it's in almost every turnaround lick ever. there are plenty more though. the 7 sounds great added the minor pen.

-Over any major or dominant blues (but not minor) you can also use the major pen. it may sound a bit country sometimes, most people say it sounds "happier." technically, there's really nothing wrong with using the diatonic major scale, it just probably won't sound very bluesy.
you can alternate between major and minor pents as much as your heart desires on major/dominant blues, just as long as you don't blabbermouth too much and it sounds good.

-Minor blues. stick with the minor pen and blue notes and throw in licks using the natural minor diatonic, especially over the IV chord.

Lastly a lot of questions get asked about the mixolydian and dorian scales with blues.
i've ever found too much use for them except for pulling single notes. basically the mixolydian is the major scale built from the perfect fourth (tonic of the IV chord) and i've never paid enough attention to the dorian scale to even know if i'm using it or not. Do a little experimentation with these, but you probably won't use them much in standard blues.

but really, i can't stress enough that the blues is not about scales, intervals, or that sort of thing. you've got to listen any chance you get and pick up what sounds good to you, then play it and find your own voice in it. there are very few rules in blues that can't be broken.
Cheers!

GD_GC
01-30-2008, 08:41 PM
alright, so i'm going to sound like an old fart. but hear me out. You're not going to learn how to play the blues well, or get a blues sound by looking up scale definitions on the internet. You've got to listen to a lot and watch some fingers closely if you can.
Here's the deal:

-Over any blues song (major, minor, dominant, whatever) you can use the minor pentatonic til your G string breaks or the drummers arms fall off.
"blue" notes sound best in conjunction with the minor pen. Lots of notes can be blue notes, you just have to find them. The b5 is most common because it's in almost every turnaround lick ever. there are plenty more though. the 7 sounds great added the minor pen.

-Over any major or dominant blues (but not minor) you can also use the major pen. it may sound a bit country sometimes, most people say it sounds "happier." technically, there's really nothing wrong with using the diatonic major scale, it just probably won't sound very bluesy.
you can alternate between major and minor pents as much as your heart desires on major/dominant blues, just as long as you don't blabbermouth too much and it sounds good.

-Minor blues. stick with the minor pen and blue notes and throw in licks using the natural minor diatonic, especially over the IV chord.

Lastly a lot of questions get asked about the mixolydian and dorian scales with blues.
i've ever found too much use for them except for pulling single notes. basically the mixolydian is the major scale built from the perfect fourth (tonic of the IV chord) and i've never paid enough attention to the dorian scale to even know if i'm using it or not. Do a little experimentation with these, but you probably won't use them much in standard blues.

but really, i can't stress enough that the blues is not about scales, intervals, or that sort of thing. you've got to listen any chance you get and pick up what sounds good to you, then play it and find your own voice in it. there are very few rules in blues that can't be broken.
Cheers!

+439857093487509 This guy totally knows what hes talking about, and put into words what I couldn't figure out how to say.

Dimebag22
01-30-2008, 09:00 PM
+439857093487509 This guy totally knows what hes talking about, and put into words what I couldn't figure out how to say.
Indeed. Great job man :cheers: You really explained it well. :)

blink+guitar
02-01-2008, 02:56 AM
lol didnt know this thread was still goin i just came back to the blues forum and its here again. but what blueslp1990 said , i totally get you and understand the point your trying to get across. so thanks for reassuraing(or how ever its spelt)