If I have a Capo on the 4th fret with chords...


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Pat McRotch
02-13-2008, 09:05 PM
Ok so I got a capo on the 4th fret...the chords I'm using are...C, G, Am, Em...what key am I in?

Also...what if I got it on the 2nd fret...the chords also being...C, G, Am, Em...


Thanks... :)

sucay
02-13-2008, 09:10 PM
E (4th)
G#/Ab (2nd)

edit: G# and Ab are the same notes

Pat McRotch
02-13-2008, 09:16 PM
E (4th)
G#/Ab (2nd)

edit: G# and Ab are the same notes


Thanks for help...I know I seem like a non theory person...It's just I have no experience with capo's so was a bit confused.... :p:

Once again thanks man :)

isaac_bandits
02-13-2008, 10:07 PM
E (4th)
G#/Ab (2nd)

edit: G# and Ab are the same notes

No.

I shall prove this.

G = GBD
C = CEG
Am = ACE
Em = EGB

We get the notes A, B, C, D, E, and G. I am almost certain it is diationic, but it has not been defined whether we will be using F or F#. If we are using an F#, than it would be in the key of G, and if we use F it would be in the key of C. Alternatively it could be using a relative minor, Em if using F#, and Am if using F.

The second fret capo just means the key is raised by two semitones.

The fourth fret capo means the key is raised by four semitones (or by two, if you compare it to the second fret capo)

Pat McRotch
02-13-2008, 10:10 PM
No.

I shall prove this.

G = GBD
C = CEG
Am = ACE
Em = EGB

We get the notes A, B, C, D, E, and G. I am almost certain it is diationic, but it has not been defined whether we will be using F or F#. If we are using an F#, than it would be in the key of G, and if we use F it would be in the key of C. Alternatively it could be using a relative minor, Em if using F#, and Am if using F.

The second fret capo just means the key is raised by two semitones.

The fourth fret capo means the key is raised by four semitones (or by two, if you compare it to the second fret capo)



Ok so...?.... :confused:

isaac_bandits
02-13-2008, 10:14 PM
Ok so...?.... :confused:

Which chord do you start and end the chord on? Do you use a D chord ever? Do you use a Dm chord ever?

Pat McRotch
02-13-2008, 10:54 PM
Which chord do you start and end the chord on? Do you use a D chord ever? Do you use a Dm chord ever?


This is chord pattern.....

C, G, Am, Em....

Then I use

C, G, B7, Em

isaac_bandits
02-13-2008, 11:39 PM
This is chord pattern.....

C, G, Am, Em....

Then I use

C, G, B7, Em

OK. B7 has the notes B, D#, F#, A.

You are playing in Em. The scale tones are E, F#, G, A, B, C, D. The B7 chord uses the major seventh scale degree (which is normally not in the song), but is necessary to create the V7 chord necessary for a perfect cadence. The rest of the chords, as well as the melody, will not need the seventh to be major.

Pat McRotch
02-14-2008, 12:34 AM
OK. B7 has the notes B, D#, F#, A.

You are playing in Em. The scale tones are E, F#, G, A, B, C, D. The B7 chord uses the major seventh scale degree (which is normally not in the song), but is necessary to create the V7 chord necessary for a perfect cadence. The rest of the chords, as well as the melody, will not need the seventh to be major.


Alright so I understand that...So what key is it in with capo on 4th fret.

Mekchrious
02-14-2008, 12:48 AM
Go up a half step every fret. So an Em goes to Fm, then F#m at the second fret, Gm on the third, G#/Ab on the fourth.

isaac_bandits
02-14-2008, 09:26 AM
Alright so I understand that...So what key is it in with capo on 4th fret.

Using a capo makes the guitar a transposing instrument. It would still be notated as Em, however it would no longer be in concert pitch (where a C on that instrument sounds the same as a C on another instrument). Putting a capo on the fourth fret makes the guitar a E instrument, which means that when a guitar plays a "C" it is actually sounding an E because of the capo (one must treat the fret the capo is on as the zero fret). There for it is in concert G#m, but is being played on an E instrument, which is a transposing insturment.

NOTE: It is only coincidence that it is an E instrument playing in Em. If the key was Am, with a capo on the fourth fret, it would still be an E instrument, but it would be playing in concert C#m, while playing, what to it would be considered Am.

Pat McRotch
02-14-2008, 01:04 PM
Using a capo makes the guitar a transposing instrument. It would still be notated as Em, however it would no longer be in concert pitch (where a C on that instrument sounds the same as a C on another instrument). Putting a capo on the fourth fret makes the guitar a E instrument, which means that when a guitar plays a "C" it is actually sounding an E because of the capo (one must treat the fret the capo is on as the zero fret). There for it is in concert G#m, but is being played on an E instrument, which is a transposing insturment.

NOTE: It is only coincidence that it is an E instrument playing in Em. If the key was Am, with a capo on the fourth fret, it would still be an E instrument, but it would be playing in concert C#m, while playing, what to it would be considered Am.



...Well...when it's on second fret I can play my harmonica in the key of A....Cause without capo the key is G...