A couple of Jazz questions.


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SealCubMassacre
02-17-2008, 08:53 PM
Which scales are best for jazz playing?

Can anyone recommend some jazz artists with good bass playing? I know of Weather Report but I want more!

Thanks and sorry if that has been done before, I've never been in this part of the site before and i'm a complete jazz newbie.

:p:

tomohawkjoe
02-17-2008, 09:00 PM
Jazz incorporates so many things into music, your best bet is to learn about modes
and modal jazz

as far as artist
I really dig these guys
Joe Pass (http://youtube.com/watch?v=aWa6aChSf1w)
John Coltrane (http://youtube.com/watch?v=8j_TDoOPnIA)
Dave Brubeck Quartet (http://youtube.com/watch?v=DDOgYw5-pNs)
George Benson (http://youtube.com/watch?v=7Df_7IaKmfI)
I'd also recommend looking into Jazz Fusion

SealCubMassacre
02-17-2008, 09:04 PM
Jazz incorporates so many things into music, your best bet is to learn about modes
and modal jazz

as far as artist
I really dig these guys
Joe Pass (http://youtube.com/watch?v=aWa6aChSf1w)
John Coltrane (http://youtube.com/watch?v=8j_TDoOPnIA)
Dave Brubeck Quartet (http://youtube.com/watch?v=DDOgYw5-pNs)
George Benson (http://youtube.com/watch?v=7Df_7IaKmfI)
I'd also recommend looking into Jazz Fusion

Wow you're everywhere today haha.

Thanks bro! I know all my modes but I don't know how to put them into action with jazz music, like which modes are appropriate for certain passages.

I guess it's just practice.

Nick_
02-17-2008, 09:06 PM
^I disagree - modal jazz is a very distinct style that an awful lot of jazz doesn't really go with.

Bebop is the dominant influence in modern jazz and it is mostly using extended chords and their alterations (which are a very similar concept to "modes" but a different way of approaching it).


Anyway start off with some Mingus - extremely good writing/arranging & awesome bass playing.

tomohawkjoe
02-17-2008, 09:09 PM
^I disagree - modal jazz is a very distinct style that an awful lot of jazz doesn't really go with.

Bebop is the dominant influence in modern jazz and it is mostly using extended chords and their alterations (which are a very similar concept to "modes" but a different way of approaching it).


Anyway start off with some Mingus - extremely good writing/arranging & awesome bass playing.
Yeah, I know Modal Jazz was used more in Jazz Fusion (correct me if I'm wrong, seriously, I hate giving out false information), but I heard it was used slightly in jazz
I think by Davis, not sure though.
Actually, could you give me some bebop if its not to much to ask man
I keep hearing about it and I really want to check some out.

carrotcake
02-17-2008, 09:12 PM
Marcus Miller (Haha my names Marcus too :p: ) is a great 'slap' style jazz player.

Him or Victor Wooten.


As for which scales (seeing that you know the modes), just try whatever sounds best!

kmbuchamushroom
02-17-2008, 09:44 PM
Yeah, I know Modal Jazz was used more in Jazz Fusion (correct me if I'm wrong, seriously, I hate giving out false information), but I heard it was used slightly in jazz
I think by Davis, not sure though.
Actually, could you give me some bebop if its not to much to ask man
I keep hearing about it and I really want to check some out.
Modal jazz is when the song is based on a certain mode rather than a key or chord progression basically. Two of the most famous examples are So What and impressions, so you were right in saying Miles was into that. There is probably some modal jazz in fusion, but I'd say its mostly in Hard bop and some be-bop.

Suggested Bee-bop:
Dexter Gordon
Ray Brown
Dizzy Gillespie
Thelonius monk
Oscar Peterson
Cannonball Adderly
Sonny Rollins
Percy Heath

Hard bop:
Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers
Horace Silver
Charles Mingus
Hank Mobley
Lee Morgan
Curtis Fuller
Paul Chambers
Wes Montgomery
Grant Green
NH°P
Joe Henderson


(Hard Bop is where its at!)

tomohawkjoe
02-17-2008, 09:53 PM
Thanks man

Nick_
02-18-2008, 12:35 AM
Miles was into a lot of different stuff, he kept progressing. He was right there for modal jazz and fusion.

He got his start playing bop with Parker, though.


Those recommendations are excellent. I'll add Freddie Hubbard and Clifford Brown to the Hardbop list, and give props for the Dexter Gordon - he gets overlooked far too often.

Resiliance
02-18-2008, 07:59 AM
Man... You want a good bassplayer? Checkout anything and everything Niels-Henning ěrsted Pedersen ever did.

Rebelw/outaCord
02-18-2008, 08:29 PM
On jazz scales:

The funny thing about jazz is that when you look at it from a Rock and Roll perspective, it seems impossible. Most of the time, you're never using the same scale for more than 4 bars (except in modal jazz).

It comes to you with time, though, as you learn your arpeggio shapes and modes and see how they all fit together. I'd recommend getting a book on jazz harmony or improvisation and working out of that for a while... there's so much information to put together for a beginner that it's somewhat insane to try and scour the internet for all of it.

Jimmy94
02-18-2008, 11:05 PM
to answer your question about jazz scales:

take lessons, your question shows you need them. It is very difficult to become proficient in jazz without lessons.

INDUSTRIALMETAL
02-19-2008, 12:57 AM
Scott Lafaro's work with the Bill Evans trio is amazing. If you are looking for an exciting but challening melodic player, Steve Swallow is a good place to look. His collaborations with Carla Bley are particularly good. Further more, Renaud Garcia Fons is an amazing player who explores many diffirent influences, and uses the bow quite frequently.

As far as learning Jazz lead guitar, I can only emphasize learning chord construction., along with the solid tips already offered If you understand the notes that can be reached within a chord within a solid context you will begin to understand the idea of "tonality" and how it can be challenged.