Gaelic Folk Music


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ToiletScrub
03-05-2008, 03:00 PM
This might be an odd one. I'm learning some folk music, and I found my parent's Rankin Family CD's and remembered they existed. Ballads are boring, but fun party songs (like the Mull River Shuffle - check that out) are brilliant to play.

So long story short, I'm wondering if you guys know any good Gaelic (Scottish/Irish) chord progressions.

Eggmond
03-05-2008, 06:01 PM
theyre mostly mixolydian

koxx
03-05-2008, 09:14 PM
If you would like a band then try Roddy Woomble. He has a great folk CD.

Dave Keir
03-06-2008, 12:10 PM
theyre mostly mixolydian
Where on earth did you get that from?? :confused:

Traditional Gaelic songs are sung without accompaniment, consequently there are no pre-existing "chord progressions". You will need to source some songs and harmonise them for yourself, or find some that have been done by others.

Pretty well all of them will be diatonic and modal in character (one or two may indeed be in the mixolydian mode ) so harmonising will simply be a matter of selection chords diatonic to the mode, more or less to taste.

Eggmond
03-06-2008, 04:41 PM
Where on earth did you get that from??

im irish.

a lot of sean nůs songs are without accompaniment but loads are

check out the dubliners or the wolfe tones for more

Greentreejester
03-06-2008, 05:45 PM
im irish.





Ohh, so that means you know every thing about irish traditional music.

Nubster12
03-06-2008, 05:51 PM
There's a fellow over on Harmony Central that goes by Jake7 that plays some traditional Celtic stuff. Not sure if you are a member there or if he is by chance a member here but might be worth hitting him up. Not sure if that is the same music as you are asking about though. Also here is his myspace site: http://www.myspace.com/rickjones39project

Dave Keir
03-06-2008, 05:54 PM
im irish.

a lot of sean nůs songs are without accompaniment but loads are

check out the dubliners or the wolfe tones for more

And I'm Scottish :)

With respect, and much as I like their music, The Dubliners is not a band I'd check out for authenticity re. Gaelic song. ;)

Best,

Eggmond
03-06-2008, 06:00 PM
Ohh, so that means you know every thing about irish traditional music.

more than you obviously

The Dubliners is not a band I'd check out for authenticity re. Gaelic song.

i know but they have gaelic style progressions and their stuff is a lot easier to find than the more authentic stuff

Greentreejester
03-06-2008, 06:05 PM
more than you obviously



i know but they have gaelic style progressions and their stuff is a lot easier to find than the more authentic stuff

Lol :p: Im shore i know far more than you, going by your comments.

ToiletScrub
03-06-2008, 06:22 PM
So far I have the Rankin Family (based in Nova Scotia) for chord progressions/songs, and if you guys like playing traditional songs they have quite a few good ones.

And I'm donning the kilt for this round. :-P Two Scotsman post in a thread...

Chad48309
03-06-2008, 06:28 PM
Lol :p: Im shore i know far more than you, going by your comments.
Can we please stop the pissing contest?

Nubster12
03-06-2008, 06:28 PM
Make it 3. Clan McDuff FTW.

Eggmond
03-06-2008, 06:40 PM
Im shore i know far more than you, going by your comments.

i can spell properly.

and you havent even given any advice on the topic

EggShen
03-11-2008, 02:23 AM
You wanna jam celtic music? Buy Glenn Weiser's celtic guitar book. Great stuff... all instrumental fingerpicking but its got variety, its got hornpipes, jigs, reels, waltez. It has songs in standard E, Drop D, and DADGAD tuning. great stuff. I love folk music and listen to tons. Free Samples of Glenn: http://www.celticguitarmusic.com/celpaddy.htm
http://www.celticguitarmusic.com/dundee.htm
just enlarge the pics. Bring back the folk! :cool:

TheDev01dOne
03-11-2008, 09:56 PM
Yes trad. music never really had guitar so it's not set in stone what you should play.. It's mostly major chord progressions in D or G and just do alternating bass/bass runs for chord changes..

Or as already stated a lot of people use DADGAD tuning aswell. Never tried that, I can barely get the hand of accompaniment in standard tuning.

The best way to learn though is become friends with a mandolin/violin/whistle/any other melodian instrument and get them to learn jigs or reels or hornpipes, whatever you like, and then just play along with them. Guitar is almost strictly an accompaniment for trad. folk music so it's relatively easy and boring I guess.

Buy a mandolin and learn some fast reels so YOU can have fun while someone else is the accompaniment.

Dave Keir
03-12-2008, 04:59 AM
I did arrange some Scottish and Irish tunes for guitar some years ago. Tabs and MP3 clips are here:

Teuchter Tunes (http://www.dave-keir.com/Pages/free-celtic-fingerstyle-tabs-and-mp3s.html)

Tommy[fin]
03-12-2008, 06:45 AM
I'm not sure if this is proper gaelic folk, but it's an irish jig played and arranged on nylon strung guitar by David Russell.

"Spatter the Dew" Awesome. :liplick:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7fywEr4wjU

johnmac_85
06-13-2008, 03:56 PM
This might be an odd one. I'm learning some folk music, and I found my parent's Rankin Family CD's and remembered they existed. Ballads are boring, but fun party songs (like the Mull River Shuffle - check that out) are brilliant to play.

So long story short, I'm wondering if you guys know any good Gaelic (Scottish/Irish) chord progressions.


Does anyone know how to play along with the Mull River Shuffle on guitar??? It would be sweet to know!