Good Starter Jazz?


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Heavens_To_Hell
03-23-2008, 12:01 PM
Hey I'm looking for some good jazz pieces/musicians to start me off.

I've been getting into bands like the Mars Volta and Radiohead and keep hearing people say they intergrate jazz into their music, so I was looking for somewhere to start so I can try and mix some jazz into my own music and make it more interesting.

I'm willing to look at anything, from Jazz solos to just a simple rhythm piece. Tab links would be appreciated too.

rx_eb
03-23-2008, 12:09 PM
Django Reinhart
Dave Brubeck
Louis Amstrong

Heavens_To_Hell
03-23-2008, 12:13 PM
Django Reinhart
Dave Brubeck
Louis Amstrong

Any particular songs?

Also is Louis Armstrong that good from a guitar/bass point of view? Unless of course you think the rhythm underneath his trumpet is useful to learn?

albino strat!
03-23-2008, 12:14 PM
Get yourself a Realbook and learn some standards...Blue Bossa, Autumn Leaves, etc

listen to a lot of jazz, Miles Davis, Mike Stern, Pat Metheny, Charlie Christian, anything you can get your hands on

albino strat!
03-23-2008, 12:15 PM
Any particular songs?

Also is Louis Armstrong that good from a guitar/bass point of view? Unless of course you think the rhythm underneath his trumpet is useful to learn?
listening to not just guitar parts but the music is what jazz is all about. dont feel like you cant learn anything from a trumpet part or even a percussion part.

Nick_
03-23-2008, 12:22 PM
That's a fairly broad range of three artists ...

ANyway for a listener like yourself, the easiest way in is the fusion path, specifically MO.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MtSIEkPqVgk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujcYw2QTPzM&feature=related

guitar & bass ... this should blow your mind right out the back ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Npy3DlV98yM

Joe Pass's "Virtuoso" albums are a must.

Heavens_To_Hell
03-23-2008, 12:22 PM
listening to not just guitar parts but the music is what jazz is all about. dont feel like you cant learn anything from a trumpet part or even a percussion part.

Ah ok.

Actually you've reminded me of something I heard. Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't Tom Morello work out how to play a jazz trumpet solo on guitar? Miles Davis I think but I can't name the song.

Are there any tabs on UG I could look at or should I just invest in a book/learn by ear? Preferably powertab but I'll learn anything. Is there even like maybe a jazz site I can go onto to look at sheet music etc?

Nick_
03-23-2008, 12:26 PM
Ever since the days of Charlie Christian, guitarists have been fond of pretending to be horn players - that means working out the solos. Transcription is huge in jazz - learning solos by ear is essential to understanding the language.

If you want to learn jazz, get used to reading sheet. A realbook is essential, too.

Jimmy94
03-23-2008, 12:28 PM
Horns are especially important to study because of their phrasing.

Check out the track Red Clay by Freddie Hubbard, the live version off the remaster cd if you can find it.

Heavens_To_Hell
03-23-2008, 12:31 PM
That's a fairly broad range of three artists ...

ANyway for a listener like yourself, the easiest way in is the fusion path, specifically MO.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MtSIEkPqVgk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujcYw2QTPzM&feature=related

guitar & bass ... this should blow your mind right out the back ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Npy3DlV98yM

Joe Pass's "Virtuoso" albums are a must.

Jesus H Christ just watched the last video. Was looking for something a TAD simpler to start with :P

Can anyone even recommend some simple jazz techniques I could try and integrate? Certain "jazzy" chords or time sigs or something? I'd be interested to become a good jazz player but currently I really just want to learn some simple stuff so I can mix it into my music. I've heard people say even bands like glassJAw have jazz influences so I'd love to try and use jazz the way they do.

EDIT: I keep hearing people recommend realbooks. Can anyone suggest some particularly good ones?

Heavens_To_Hell
03-23-2008, 12:46 PM
Watched the Joe Pass video again.

What scale(s) is he working in? Or is jazz less dependant on scales and theory than other genres? I know there's like atonal jazz, but in terms of the more melodic stuff like that what kind of scales and modes would be useful to learn?

Can anyone also recommend some more cross-over and fusion artists who have elements of like jazz and rock or metal or something?

sinan90
03-23-2008, 12:50 PM
Generally in jazz the improvisation is more about the chord then a scale, so say the underlying chord was a Cmaj7, you'd use C E G and B as the main "focus" notes then add in other notes to "flavour" the music at your will.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Real-Book-Instruments-Books-Leonard/dp/0634060384/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1206290948&sr=8-1 for the real book.

Edit: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=9695961&postcount=78 is a list of fusion artists, just make a random pick and see if you like them, stabs in the dark ftw!

Heavens_To_Hell
03-23-2008, 12:55 PM
Generally in jazz the improvisation is more about the chord then a scale, so say the underlying chord was a Cmaj7, you'd use C E G and B as the main "focus" notes then add in other notes to "flavour" the music at your will.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Real-Book-Instruments-Books-Leonard/dp/0634060384/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1206290948&sr=8-1 for the real book.

Edit: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=9695961&postcount=78 is a list of fusion artists, just make a random pick and see if you like them, stabs in the dark ftw!

Ah ok thanks.

Can you find that book in "normal" book shops or would I have to go to a specialist music shop? Or would it only be available online?

sinan90
03-23-2008, 12:56 PM
Can you find that book in "normal" book shops or would I have to go to a specialist music shop? Or would it only be available online?


Big bookshops might have it, any good music shop should have it, and amazon always has it.

Nick_
03-23-2008, 01:38 PM
Donna Lee is a Parker tune, straight ahead bop. Bop doesn't really use this notion of scales and modes that this forum tends to push; the chords move to fast (the durations in DL range from two bars to half a bar) and the keys shift too often. Chord tones and chromatic approaches to said chord tones and the mindset of forward motion to resolution drive the style. Visit http://bopland.org/ to check out some examples of bebop lines - memorize them if you can, they're your beef stew.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDQlSSOXU6A&feature=related
weather report is damn good fusion, but it's closer to the "fuzak" that fusion would become than MO. Plus, you'll notice, no guitar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmlVwBlcW3Q&feature=related
Miles was at the forefront of the fusion movement, but his brand I've seen best described as claustrophobic. It's damn good, but it can be very primal and scary at times.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCg_EGPb1QA&feature=related
Al di can play stupid fast and people seem to like that.

imgooley
03-23-2008, 03:36 PM
Donna Lee is a Parker tune, straight ahead bop. Bop doesn't really use this notion of scales and modes that this forum tends to push; the chords move to fast (the durations in DL range from two bars to half a bar) and the keys shift too often. Chord tones and chromatic approaches to said chord tones and the mindset of forward motion to resolution drive the style. Visit http://bopland.org/ to check out some examples of bebop lines - memorize them if you can, they're your beef stew.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDQlSSOXU6A&feature=related
weather report is damn good fusion, but it's closer to the "fuzak" that fusion would become than MO. Plus, you'll notice, no guitar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmlVwBlcW3Q&feature=related
Miles was at the forefront of the fusion movement, but his brand I've seen best described as claustrophobic. It's damn good, but it can be very primal and scary at times.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCg_EGPb1QA&feature=related
Al di can play stupid fast and people seem to like that.
That is a very true statement, and bop also uses a lot of dissonance in the music as well. In guitar jazz (i am not familiar with many bop jazz guitarists, unless charlie christian and wes were bop, but they don't sound like it) the seven chord is integral.

Theory is also very important, especially in freeform jazz and Avant Garde style jazz, including chord progressions, modes, key modulation etc.