how long does a whole note last?


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Extraordinairy
04-09-2008, 11:03 PM
i used google and found a wise answer saying a whole note lasts half as long as a double whole note and i was like.....speechless...

i need to know the duration of the whole note in seconds because i need to learn time signature to improve my skills, and once i know this i can figure out how long others last and i heard it lasts four beats but how long does one beat last?

there is a metronome site so you can tell me which number it is.
http://www.metronomeonline.com/

and a quarter note last half a second right?
because my clock goes faster than that like whenever 2 beats of a quarter note is reached in one second and i count the next two in another one second and the quarter note last longer this time so it went over 1 second and i got confused.

I'm learning this so i can play tabs under correct time when someone sings something.

nt1440
04-09-2008, 11:04 PM
it depends on the time sig, either way its held for a while measure, the length of the measure depending on the time sig of course

Punk Poser
04-09-2008, 11:04 PM
4 clicks of the metronome is a whole note in common time.

DaddyTwoFoot
04-09-2008, 11:06 PM
A beat does not last a certain amount of time like a second or minute. It depends on the tempo and time signature.

BladeSlinger
04-09-2008, 11:08 PM
i used google and found a wise answer saying a whole note lasts half as long as a double whole note and i was like.....speechless...

i need to know the duration of the whole note in seconds because i need to learn time signature to improve my skills, and once i know this i can figure out how long others last and i heard it lasts four beats but how long does one beat last?

there is a metronome site so you can tell me which number it is.
http://www.metronomeonline.com/

and a quarter note last half a second right?
because my clock goes faster than that like whenever 2 beats of a quarter note is reached in one second and i count the next two in another one second and the quarter note last longer this time so it went over 1 second and i got confused.

I'm learning this so i can play tabs under correct time when someone sings something.
Whole note is four beats in 4/4 time....If I'm not mistaken, I whole note is a measure in whatever signature you're in right?

cashewchaching
04-09-2008, 11:10 PM
yeah, there is nowhere that says exactly how long a whole note lasts. you're thinking of it wrong.

Rocketface2112
04-09-2008, 11:12 PM
daddytwofoot is right, you need to know the tempo before you can know how long 1 beat is. a tab should tell you what the tempo is

BladeSlinger
04-09-2008, 11:14 PM
daddytwofoot is right, you need to know the tempo before you can know how long 1 beat is. a tab should tell you what the tempo is
Or just listen to the song.....

ERA
04-09-2008, 11:22 PM
The length of a whole note all depends on the tempo. A whole note in 60 BPM may be around 4 seconds while 140 BPM may be 2 seconds (not exact times here :))

kirbyrocknroll
04-09-2008, 11:27 PM
The length of a whole note all depends on the tempo. A whole note in 60 BPM may be around 4 seconds while 140 BPM may be 2 seconds (not exact times here :))
In 4/4 time, that is!

5/4
04-09-2008, 11:27 PM
It's commonly accepted that a whole note simply lasts for 4 beats. Whether in 4/4 or 7/4...doesn't matter.

ERA
04-09-2008, 11:30 PM
In 4/4 time, that is!

Correct.

BladeSlinger
04-09-2008, 11:43 PM
It's commonly accepted that a whole note simply lasts for 4 beats. Whether in 4/4 or 7/4...doesn't matter.
I hate your screen name....Our band suck in anything that isn't 2/4 or 4/4....Sometimes we can get 3/4 and we did one in 7/4 but seriously....we suck...

Maharg
04-10-2008, 11:51 AM
The length of a whole note all depends on the tempo. A whole note in 60 BPM may be around 4 seconds while 120 BPM is 2 seconds

fixed

Liger02
04-10-2008, 11:55 AM
Time signature
if the time signature is:

4/4 = o(whole note)=4 beats in a measure
3/4 = o(whole note)=3 beats in a measure


it depends on the time sig, either way its held for a while measure, the length of the measure depending on the time sig of course


you can replace /4 by /8

5/4 can also be 5/8

grampastumpy
04-10-2008, 11:58 AM
4 beats generally, and don't think of it in seconds, as that'll get you stuck at 60/120/240/480 bpm. :p: It's all in beats.

Punk Poser
04-10-2008, 02:51 PM
4/4 = o(whole note)=4 beats in a measure
3/4 = o(whole note)=3 beats in a measure

Pretty sure there are no whole notes in 3/4 and the dotted half gets 3 beats.

5/4
04-10-2008, 03:13 PM
Pretty sure there are no whole notes in 3/4 and the dotted half gets 3 beats.

Correct.

5/4
04-10-2008, 03:15 PM
I hate your screen name....Our band suck in anything that isn't 2/4 or 4/4....Sometimes we can get 3/4 and we did one in 7/4 but seriously....we suck...

Don't hate; embrace!

Once you get into the groove of odd time signatures, they really start making sense. Think of 5/4 as being 1-2-3-1-2....makes much more sense.

GuitarMunky
04-10-2008, 03:22 PM
i used google and found a wise answer saying a whole note lasts half as long as a double whole note and i was like.....speechless...

i need to know the duration of the whole note in seconds because i need to learn time signature to improve my skills, and once i know this i can figure out how long others last and i heard it lasts four beats but how long does one beat last?

there is a metronome site so you can tell me which number it is.
http://www.metronomeonline.com/

and a quarter note last half a second right?
because my clock goes faster than that like whenever 2 beats of a quarter note is reached in one second and i count the next two in another one second and the quarter note last longer this time so it went over 1 second and i got confused.

I'm learning this so i can play tabs under correct time when someone sings something.

dont count them in "seconds"....

learn what a beat is. learn how to count beats.

try a beginning method book.... like mel bay or something.

Spend some time learning the basics.

Sublime Stylee
04-10-2008, 04:17 PM
Tap your foot four times and count, "one...two...three...four". That's a whole note in 4/4 time.

edg
04-10-2008, 04:37 PM
Pretty sure there are no whole notes in 3/4

Just to clarify, you *can* have a whole note in 3/4 time, it's just that you'd
never, ever write it that way notationally. If your whole note started on
beat 1 of 3/4 measure it'd be a dotted half tied to a quarter note (in the
next measure).

CowboyUp
04-10-2008, 04:43 PM
lol @ this thread.

A good way to get acquainted with rhythms is to get involved in your school's band.

bangoodcharlote
04-10-2008, 04:56 PM
Just to clarify, a whole note lasts the same time as four quarter notes, REGARDLESS OF METER OR TEMPO.

dividedsky
04-10-2008, 05:14 PM
One Whole Note= One Whole Measure
in 4/4 Time = 4 beats
at 120 bpm (beats per minute) = 2 seconds (4 beats)

CowboyUp
04-10-2008, 05:21 PM
One Whole Note= One Whole Measure
in 4/4 Time = 4 beats
at 120 bpm (beats per minute) = 2 seconds (4 beats)

Wrong.

dividedsky
04-10-2008, 05:27 PM
^ehh sorry I was using a simple 4/4 example.

edit: whole note USUALLY = 4 beats

CowboyUp
04-10-2008, 05:35 PM
I didn't say that was wrong. I said that your statement "one whole measure" was wrong.

GuitarMunky
04-10-2008, 05:42 PM
I didn't say that was wrong. I said that your statement "one whole measure" was wrong.


it usually does though. and for someone that doesnt even know what a whole note is ( the TS)... its not a bad way to see it..... considering when you learn to count you generally start in 4/4.

it would consider the suggestion that a whole note lasts for a whole measure to be more helpful ( and accurate for many situations) than saying ............

"WRONG"..... with no explanation.

bangoodcharlote
04-10-2008, 05:45 PM
edit: whole note USUALLY = 4 beats It always takes up four quarter notes. In X/4 time, that is four beats, save compound X/4 meters. In 12/8 time, a whole note will take up the first two beats and two-thirds of the third beat.

However...


A whole note lasts the same time as four quarter notes, REGARDLESS OF METER OR TEMPO.


Repeated for emphasis.

GuitarMunky
04-10-2008, 05:49 PM
do your self a favor though, and start with common time 4/4.

learn what a beat is
learn your note values

12/8 means nothing if you cant play a whole note in common time.

get yourself a beginners guitar method, and/ or take some lessons if you can.

LoneWanderer13
04-11-2008, 04:24 AM
I have seen pieces where a whole note is used to fill in a whole bar, despite that the bar is more than 4 beats long. I was once thrown off by this in music theory class and asked about it and while it isn't traditionally done, it's alright to do since it's usually very clear what you mean (since you have only one note for that measure, and without any rests it's clear that it lasts the whole bar). This is mostly done in jazz from my understanding. But yeah, usually it's just 4 beats. Just saying you guys shouldn't underline/bold/caps statements that have exceptions.

ColdbulleT
04-11-2008, 04:35 AM
Ok, threadstarter. Go to http://www.musictheory.net/ and in the first couple of lessons it explains how duration works in music. Now learn.

iruka2998
04-11-2008, 07:34 AM
depends on the tempo. cause obviously if the tempo is bigger, the whole note will be shorter.

edit - nvm someone has already said that

Liger02
04-11-2008, 07:38 AM
Pretty sure there are no whole notes in 3/4 and the dotted half gets 3 beats.


oh yeah i forgot that one


o. means the beat of the whole note for ex. is 4 if it has . it becomes 2

ol=2 ol.=1 (ol suppose to be half note just imagine it is)

Souls United
04-11-2008, 08:10 AM
It all depends on tempo and time signature.

In 4/4 time:

If you have a tempo of 30 BPM, each quarter note would last 2 seconds; therefore, a whole note would be 8 seconds.

If you have a tempo of 60 BPM, each quarter note would last 1 second; therefore, a whole note would be 4 seconds.

If you have a tempo of 240 BPM, each quarter note would last 1/4 of a second; therefore, a whole note would be 1 second.

This would change in other time signatures.
------

Now on to time signatures...

The top number is the number of beats per measure, and the bottom number is the number that determines the type of note that constitutes a beat.


For example, a 4 on the bottom means that a quarter note equals one beat.

An 8 on the bottom means an eighth note equals one beat.
---

Hope this helps =)