What happens if you don't use the recommended power supply with a boss pedal?


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antroolez
04-24-2008, 09:54 PM
is that all just a marketing gimmick?

can you just use an ordinary power supply?

thanks

angeldef
04-24-2008, 09:55 PM
Well if you use the right one, no problem. Get the one with the right voltage and all those tech stuff, as long as its putting the right amount of electricity in the pedal who cares what brand you use.

shaakaal
04-24-2008, 09:56 PM
marketing gimmick.

any 9v with the correct polarity (- inside +on the outside i think) that supplies enough amperes (250 milliamperes minimumi think) will work fine.

ShutDown785
04-24-2008, 09:57 PM
As long as the voltage matches up, 9v DC pedal with a 9v DC power supply, you will be fine.

MedicreDemon
04-24-2008, 09:57 PM
Get a 1SPOT it works for liek everything and you can buy the adapter to put it on liek 5 - 12 pedals at once as long as you don't need more tham 1700 milliamps, I had teh saem trouble with stupid BOSS pedals you can get any adapter that says its compatabile with the PA5 or whatever it is they say you need.

CapnKickass
04-24-2008, 09:59 PM
I've used a boss power supply with a digitech pedal even though the manual says to only use a digitech power supply, and nothing wrong has happened. It's probably a gimmick.

SkateEmerica987
04-24-2008, 09:59 PM
I was just going to suggest the 1spot but i see the guy above already did, its great and cheap just buy the multi plug and you for about 30 bucks you can power 9 or 10 pedals its great.

antroolez
04-24-2008, 09:59 PM
its just i have a gig tomorrow and want to use my Boss DF-2, I don't have a BOSS power supply, but have a regular one...you know that has all the different voltages?

would I be alright using it do you reckon?

SenorBill
04-24-2008, 09:59 PM
Every power supply is different. You've not only looking for a power supply with the same voltage as what's written on your pedal or written in the manual, but it also needs to have the same polarity and I believe the same current as well. Just because the plugs look the same does not mean it will work properly. I incorrectly assumed this with a power supply for a cordless phone one time and the phone ended up emitting a puff of smoke and never worked again thereafter.

Safer to use the boss but if you happen to have one with the same three characteristics (voltage, current, polarity) go for it.

antroolez
04-24-2008, 10:02 PM
ah **** it i'll risk it for a biscuit

long as i dont melt or explode or anythin

cheers people

CapnKickass
04-24-2008, 10:03 PM
I was just going to suggest the 1spot but i see the guy above already did, its great and cheap just buy the multi plug and you for about 30 bucks you can power 9 or 10 pedals its great.
$30 damn, I got a DC Brick, which cost like $100, but it's bulit like a brick at least, so it'll last.

shigidab0p
04-24-2008, 10:06 PM
It should work fine, but of note is that BOSS probably won't want to hear from you if the pedal screwed up.

antroolez
04-24-2008, 10:13 PM
hmm

unless i lie to them

mwuhahaha

Dan_Q
04-24-2008, 10:23 PM
I bought a "uniross" generic power supply unit from argos donkeys years ago, one of those ones where you set the polarity and voltage on an adjustable dial. All I did was cut off the connector and soldered on a butchered boss power supply cable, one of those ones with several connectors on it.

It cost peanuts and its still working now (just dug it out cos I've just started playing again), it powers my boss, pearl and marshall effects. :)

Tackleberry
04-24-2008, 11:06 PM
I have a BOSS pedal and it wont work off the multi voltage adapter I have. Doesnt even light up. The adapter works my other pedals but not the boss. My 1spot powers it tho. I know BOSS has a thing that they refuse to warranty a pedal if you dont use their overpriced adapter. So the answer is maybe it will work maybe not.

FLCLcowdude
04-24-2008, 11:07 PM
If you don't use the Boss adapter, the entire world will explode!

Nah, just kidding, you should be fine. Just unplug it if it starts smoking...

Because second hand smoke is bad for you! :p:

80sShred4TheWin
04-24-2008, 11:42 PM
I think it will work but ya know who I realy hate out of these companys is line 6 there DL-4 doesn't work with my brick thank god my digitech rp 200 power supply works with it.
I knew it would be good for something someday.

Holy Katana
04-25-2008, 01:24 AM
Make sure it's a 9V. Any more, and your pedal will cook.

CyBerAliEn
04-25-2008, 03:19 AM
There are three parameters to a power supply: the voltage, the current, and the polarity.

Voltage has to MATCH. If your pedal needs 9V DC, the supply needs to give 9V DC; anything different will not work. 9V AC is not the same thing; 8.5V DC is not the same thing. Etc. The polarity also needs to match! The plug, even though you can't see it readily, has a positive (+) and negative (-) side. And depending on how the pedal's circuit is setup will determine the type of polarity it needs. They need to match up!

Lastly... your current does not have to match! The power supply has to supply at least as much as the pedal needs, or more! Your typical pedal requires ~250mA... as long as your supply can supply 250mA, you are good (this is an example figure). So if you have a pedal that needs 305mA... a supply that's rated at 280mA will not work; one rated at 320mA will work; one at 580mA will work; one at 1.5A will work; etc. You can supply way more current than is needed, it just has to be more than the pedal needs.


Aside from that... the specifications in the manual's about using only this power supply is not entirely true, but it is not a marketing gimmick. This is an easy "disclaimer"... because your typical user won't understand the difference between power supplies to know what types of supplies are and are not suitable... so it is much easier to say across the board "only use our supplies".

mr_hankey
04-25-2008, 06:23 AM
There are three parameters to a power supply: the voltage, the current, and the polarity.

Voltage has to MATCH. If your pedal needs 9V DC, the supply needs to give 9V DC; anything different will not work. 9V AC is not the same thing; 8.5V DC is not the same thing. Etc.

Most new batteries will give you +/- 10v; and nearly all pedals will still easily work at half that voltage (but it may change the tone). My 9v adapter puts out 12v, so that's what I use on my 9v pedals. They all still work.

JWBlack
04-25-2008, 06:39 AM
I've used multi voltage adapters and my dano adapters all with no issues

buzz
04-25-2008, 11:53 AM
yeah i have a zoom adaptor from years ago and use it with my Boss DD2..... I was a bit apprehensive that the world would end if I combined a Zoom adaptor with a Boss pedal, but thankfully it worked out ok.

GHJ
04-25-2008, 12:02 PM
I use a 9V, 400mA adapter that I bought from Maplins to power my Boss pedals. Used it for around 3 or 4 years with no bother.

stevo_epi_SG_wo
04-25-2008, 12:54 PM
if you dont use the boss one, the CEO of bos gets one less porche.....can you live with that?

CyBerAliEn
04-25-2008, 01:00 PM
Most new batteries will give you +/- 10v; and nearly all pedals will still easily work at half that voltage (but it may change the tone). My 9v adapter puts out 12v, so that's what I use on my 9v pedals. They all still work.

But you want to run your pedals at their designed voltage. They are made a way for a reason. If the voltage difference is significantly greater than the pedal's circuit is designed for, you will fry/destroy component's on the board. If the pedal says "9V DC" you want to give it 9V DC... anything more and you start running the risk of trashing your pedal. (if the voltage didn't really matter, you wouldn't have to use a transformer, ie "your power supply", to drop your socket's 120V power supply)

zeemonkey
08-10-2008, 03:43 PM
hey. i tried to plug in 12v ac to my Boss Metal Zone (mt-2) because my 9v adapter is dead. I plugged it in and my amp started to hiss a bit more than usual. Is this ok? and what if i continuing to power my 9v pedal with a 12v adapter? will it kill the pedal?

l3p4rd
08-10-2008, 03:48 PM
There are three parameters to a power supply: the voltage, the current, and the polarity.

Lastly... your current does not have to match! The power supply has to supply at least as much as the pedal needs, or more! Your typical pedal requires ~250mA... as long as your supply can supply 250mA, you are good (this is an example figure). So if you have a pedal that needs 305mA... a supply that's rated at 280mA will not work; one rated at 320mA will work; one at 580mA will work; one at 1.5A will work; etc. You can supply way more current than is needed, it just has to be more than the pedal needs.



wrong, if you have more mA, you'll get this annoying buzz.

Fama
08-10-2008, 03:56 PM
hey. i tried to plug in 12v ac to my Boss Metal Zone (mt-2) because my 9v adapter is dead. I plugged it in and my amp started to hiss a bit more than usual. Is this ok? and what if i continuing to power my 9v pedal with a 12v adapter? will it kill the pedal?
I suggest you just get a 9v adapter, it might not blow the pedal - but then again it might. It depends on the parts used on the pedal, so I suggest you play it safe and get a 9v adapter.
wrong, if you have more mA, you'll get this annoying buzz.
Umm, no, the pedal will only take as much mA as it needs, no matter how much the power supply can supply.

Jestersage
08-10-2008, 04:32 PM
Yes and no. You need to make sure the ground is negative inside, positive on the outside. Most houshold 9v devices use the inverse, however.

stujomo
08-10-2008, 04:43 PM
The pedal will only draw as much current as it needs but a cheap crappy unstable supply may induce hum or buzz.

jessexxx
08-10-2008, 06:33 PM
yeah!!....i have noticed that my pedals dont work as good once ya let the smoke out of them!!!!



but seriously folks!! ...(rim shot)


like someone else already stated,...it's the mA. thats most important,..as in you want to have enough,...i would get a 9v power supply for my pedals...but a 12v would probably be ok as long as the mA. are enough.

i have a boss ns-2 that requires it's own one-spot..(wont work right daisy chained..yet it's supposed to be good up to 1700 mA.) ...go figure.

electricity in a wire is like water in a pipe.
voltage is the pressure
amperage is the amount

thats why they say,..it isnt the voltage that kills ya...its the amperage!

<---electrician---

whiteraven119
08-10-2008, 06:37 PM
My Boss TU-2 works without the Boss power supply, but my DS-1 doesn't.

I have no clue why.

Reincaster
08-11-2008, 09:30 AM
It should work fine, but of note is that BOSS probably won't want to hear from you if the pedal screwed up.

This is why they tell you to use their own power supply. If you go on evilbay, but a $0.99 2amp 9v power supply, put it on your boss pedals, and the ****tiness of the adaptor blows your pedal, boss won't cover it.

wrong, if you have more mA, you'll get this annoying buzz.

This is false. Hum and buzz comes from bad, or weak ground connections in your power outlet, guitar, pedals, and so forth. I use a onespot with 4 pedals, totalling less than 800 mah, while the 1spot puts out 1.5 A

l3p4rd
08-11-2008, 09:38 AM
then it might have been coincidence that I grounded a few power supplies and the ones with too much mA would get buzzing

jcp42877
08-11-2008, 10:02 AM
if you don't use the power supply, somewhere in a third world country, a bomb blows up a village

Van Noord
08-11-2008, 11:16 AM
The Boss PSA is the standard and can be used with other brands of pedals.
Just don't use an adapter that is more than 9 volts or 250 mili amps

Fama
08-11-2008, 11:21 AM
The Boss PSA is the standard and can be used with other brands of pedals.
Just don't use an adapter that is more than 9 volts or 250 mili amps
Why not? I understand the volts but the current doesn't matter (as long as there's enough).

duggyrocks
08-11-2008, 11:46 AM
The universe will collapse into itself

IbanezPsycho
08-11-2008, 12:03 PM
http://bp1.blogger.com/_YGLQQZTHoU0/SDMHhqkCKHI/AAAAAAAACl0/XM6iVof-HTI/s400/nuclear_blast.jpg

superslash1994
08-11-2008, 12:10 PM
marketing gimmick.

any 9v with the correct polarity (- inside +on the outside i think) that supplies enough amperes (250 milliamperes minimumi think) will work fine.

This^




Get a 1SPOT it works for liek everything and you can buy the adapter to put it on liek 5 - 12 pedals at once as long as you don't need more tham 1700 milliamps, I had teh saem trouble with stupid BOSS pedals you can get any adapter that says its compatabile with the PA5 or whatever it is they say you need.

http://www.funnyforumpics.com/forums/You-Are/3/You-Are-Not_cool_(leet_speek).jpg


Sorry.. just wanted to use that, seemed appropriate.. :peace:

Van Noord
08-11-2008, 10:40 PM
Why not? I understand the volts but the current doesn't matter (as long as there's enough).Using an adapter withtoo high of mili amps will cause the adapter to overheat and subsequently damage your amp.
Mili amps are actually more dangerous to a person than volts. 150 mili amps can kill a person, while it would take about 10,000 volts to do the same damage.

Fama
08-12-2008, 02:06 PM
Using an adapter withtoo high of mili amps will cause the adapter to overheat and subsequently damage your amp.
Mili amps are actually more dangerous to a person than volts. 150 mili amps can kill a person, while it would take about 10,000 volts to do the same damage.
You sir, are either an idiot or just misinformed. Please do not post if you have no idea what you're talking about.

No matter HOW much current (that's your "mili amps") an adapter can supply, the pedal only draws AS MUCH AS IT NEEDS. No more. Thus it doesn't matter.

Reincaster
08-12-2008, 06:46 PM
Using an adapter withtoo high of mili amps will cause the adapter to overheat and subsequently damage your amp.
Mili amps are actually more dangerous to a person than volts. 150 mili amps can kill a person, while it would take about 10,000 volts to do the same damage.

Nope, you just just don't know what your talking about.

Analog boss pedals draw about 50-100 mah, while they can supply up 500mah, thats about 5x the power required. Yet, that's the only pedal power supply designed for it.

Think of current like a pool of water, and the pedals like an 8 oz cup. The pool could have 200 gallons, or 2000 gallons, but if you dip the cup in it, you'll only ever get 8 oz.

_nilsen_
08-12-2008, 07:39 PM
have been using another powersupply for an old me-50 i use in my practice-rig for a long time... as long as it gives out the right voltage and enough ampere it's all smooth sailing.. ;)

Van Noord
08-13-2008, 01:56 AM
You sir, are either an idiot or just misinformed. Please do not post if you have no idea what you're talking about.

No matter HOW much current (that's your "mili amps") an adapter can supply, the pedal only draws AS MUCH AS IT NEEDS. No more. Thus it doesn't matter.Is that so? Then why don't you find a 9 volt adapter with a Boss like tip, polarity and a rating of 500 ma's. Use it for a little while with your favorite pedal through your favorite amp. Then see what happens.

IncubusMan999
08-13-2008, 02:49 AM
Taekn from BOSS website:
If not used with the recommended Boss PSA-120 adapter, your Boss pedal will sprout legs and kick you in the balls at 3 minute intervals until the foreign power supply is removed.
(It'll be fine, mate, use any 9V DC adapter)

Reincaster
08-13-2008, 10:24 AM
Is that so? Then why don't you find a 9 volt adapter with a Boss like tip, polarity and a rating of 500 ma's. Use it for a little while with your favorite pedal through your favorite amp. Then see what happens.

I use a 1spot, which supplies 1.7 A, or 1700 mah, with my dd-6, CS-2, OCD, and TIM and I can run it for hours with no problem. And into my quickrod.

This is the OFFICIAL boss adaptor, supplies up to 500ma:

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Boss-PSA120S-ADAPTER?sku=155555

Want to try anymore weaksauce arguments?

I just got an email from BOSS

RE: Support Request #32746
Product: Boss power adaptor
Subject: use of mah rating?
Question: Hi, I was speaking to a fellow musician, and he tells me that using an adaptor that is rated with too much mah will damage a pedal, and consequently an amp. I know this is not true, because pedals will only draw what current is needed, however, can I get your thoughts on this? In fact, isn't the current psa120 capable of providing 500mah? When most analog boss pedals only require less than 100mah?

Hello Aaron,
Providing a higher level of mA's will not damage the BOSS pedals.
The PSA-120S supplies 500 mA's.


Sincerely,
Roland Product Support

Van Noord
08-14-2008, 11:29 AM
I use a 1spot, which supplies 1.7 A, or 1700 mah, with my dd-6, CS-2, OCD, and TIM and I can run it for hours with no problem. And into my quickrod.

This is the OFFICIAL boss adaptor, supplies up to 500ma:

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Boss-PSA120S-ADAPTER?sku=155555

Want to try anymore weaksauce arguments?

I just got an email from BOSSDid you call your mommy and daddy too? You've got to much time on your hands.
Read my post, it's your amp that will be in trouble, not the pedal.

Reincaster
08-14-2008, 11:42 AM
Did you call your mommy and daddy too? You've got to much time on your hands.
Read my post, it's your amp that will be in trouble, not the pedal.


Read my post, I've been doing it for years, and so have many other people. Do you really think a company like boss would make an adapter that would damage amps? Why the hell would any company make something like the DC brick, or Voodoo Labs Pedal power if too much mah would fry your amp? What about the battery inside the pedal then? Duracell's have a mah rating of 580mah, doesn't seem to fry my amp at all?


you'll learn this stuff when you get to the 8th grade.

stujomo
08-14-2008, 12:13 PM
How will it damage the amp? You need a combination of enough volts and amps to kill someone. If you hold the terminals of a 12 volt car battery you won't feel a thing but some can deliver more than 60 amps and you could easily start a fire with one. With 240volts you will recieve an electric shock and very little amps will kill you. The only possible problem with a large power supply is that should a pedal short circuit the heat build up will be much greater because a short will allow the supply to dump its full power. How ever even a 9v 300ma supply has mains voltage on the other side and it is possible if the transformer should fail in some way that you could still do considerable damage to yourself, pedals and amp. Tube amps have very high B voltages and should some thing go wrong you could also get a nasty shock from one of those. To be honest anything plugged in to the mains could have the potential to kill you.

sfx
12-22-2009, 01:36 AM
don't mean to bump old post but I must say this.


All the examples given in this thread missed one very important issue.

Regulated vs non-regulated power supply.



Even if you have 9v correct polarity and tons of MA juice, an unregulated adapter with high MA rating, 500++ is dangerous to use with low loading pedals.


You will fry a boss ds-1 or severly shorten it's life with an unregulated adapter with high milliamps rated output (assuming everything else is matching) since the voltage would never reach 9v due to the high amperage rating. It has got nothing to do with the pedal drawing only as much as milliamps needed because the voltage would never be 9v, it will go up to 12v if you load a 500ma unregulated 9v adapter with a boss ds-1 which draws only 4ma. You have to add more pedals to load the unregulated adapter to bring it down to 9v.

I've tested this with a digital multimeter so I know what I am talking about. I always bring a digital multimeter everytime I go shopping for a power supply, and bring along my mini 9v amp as a noise sensor (it is very sensitive to unfiltered/noisy power) with the volume turned on at full blast to listen to power noise.


So the correct way is this


1. Correct 9v voltage.
2. Supply enough of MA.
3. Correct polarity.
4. REGULATED adapter. <---- Very important for safety of pedal in addition to above.
5. FILTERED. <-------- Very important for noise free.


Regulated does not mean filtered. I have switch mode power supplies that failed requirement number 5. While it would be safe to use the switch-mode adapter on the pedals, you would not like the noise it introduces.


It is best to stick to non-switchmode adapters if you can because the transformer design is cleaner (after you add chip for regulating and filtering the noise).

Switchmode adapters do introduce noise just like unregulated/unfiltered transformer wall warts/adapter.



When given a choice between regulated transformer and switchmode adapter, choose the transformer based design if it supplies the right milliamps/amperage to you.

d a v e
12-22-2009, 02:45 AM
someone used my electro harmonix power supply on a boss pedal and the power supply broke. also ive bought two boss power supplies for boss pedals and theyve both broken.

Cathbard
12-22-2009, 03:08 AM
Why do people give advice on electrical matters when they don't even understand Ohm's law? The amperage rating on a power supply is what it CAN supply, not what it does supply (as others have pointed out). The power supply isn't a pump.
If the device pulls more current than the supply can source the supply will overheat and may blow up. If the supply can source more current than the pedal can draw all is well. Saying that a higher current rating on your supply will blow up your pedal is akin to saying that a 100W speaker will blow up a 15W amp even if the impedance is correct. ie it's a complete load of bollocks. Having a bigger supply current rating is what is called headroom.
Just get the voltage and polarity right and a current rating has to be adequate or greater. But get a decent supply that filtered and regulated - AND CHECK THE POLARITY. I prefer to build my own tbh, that way I know it's built properly.

sfx
12-22-2009, 03:16 AM
Why do people give advice on electrical matters when they don't even understand Ohm's law? The amperage rating on a power supply is what it CAN supply, not what it does supply (as others have pointed out). The power supply isn't a pump.
If the device pulls more current than the supply can source the supply will overheat and may blow up. If the supply can source more current than the pedal can draw all is well. Saying that a higher current rating on your supply will blow up your pedal is akin to saying that a 100W speaker will blow up a 15W amp even if the impedance is correct. ie it's a complete load of bollocks. Having a bigger supply current rating is what is called headroom.
Just get the voltage and polarity right and a current rating has to be adequate or greater. But get a decent supply that filtered and regulated - AND CHECK THE POLARITY. I prefer to build my own tbh, that way I know it's built properly.


You should try measuring the voltage output of a high milliamps unregulated adapter connected to a low load pedal like boss ds-1.


You would be surprised at how much voltage the adapter is putting out, way above 9v.


12v in cases i've tested (after loaded) and without load, the adapter puts out 16V.

Cathbard
12-22-2009, 03:31 AM
Like I said - "get a decent supply that is filtered and regulated". You just demonstrated why I build my own. That's some crap supply man.

Weeping_Demon7
12-22-2009, 04:02 AM
Don't some people intentionally starve their OD pedals of power to get a more grungier sound?

For instance, when my Metal Muff was running out of battery, the tone was a lot more grungier and rough.

sfx
12-22-2009, 04:27 AM
Don't some people intentionally starve their OD pedals of power to get a more grungier sound?

For instance, when my Metal Muff was running out of battery, the tone was a lot more grungier and rough.


I would use a 7 or 5 volt adapter with everything in order to starve it.

:D

Bostonrocks
12-22-2009, 04:31 AM
Holy Old thread batman!!!!


Leave this alone you guys. this thing is a year old!!!