i need a jazz rec


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pistols
05-25-2008, 09:13 AM
i was listening to the black sabbath song planet caravan, and got inspired by the solo at the end. so if anyone knows any jazz that's slow, mellow, a bit sad, etc, i need some recomendations.

also, i'm terrible with theory, so any scales and chords that have that sad sort of vibe would be appreciated too. don't just say minor.

cheers.

hippieboy444
05-25-2008, 09:26 AM
okay, for mellow jazz, I'd check out "Kind Of Blue" by Miles Davis. great record. I dunno if you want guitar, but its all trumpet, sax., and rythm section.

also, look into george bensons' records before "Breezin'".

As for chords, mainly use Minor 7ths, Minor 6ths, and major b9.

scales - use all the modes and add chromatics to them. basically, play modes, but often, just do chromatic runs between notes.

CryingAlone
05-25-2008, 09:26 AM
Minor

oh wait this isnt the pit

okay Locrian, Phrygian, gypsy scales, add lots of vibrato, phrasing etc

Nick_
05-25-2008, 10:17 AM
For mellow jazz Bill Evans (look him up) always comes to mind.

But if you want some guitar, check this Wes clip out. One of the greatest ever.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOm17yw__6U



Jazz isn't so much about what you play, but how you play it. The whole modes thing? throw it out the window for now. It's only thought about in a small subset of jazz, and not in the way it's taught on this forum.

You can play anything with just the four basic triads if you know how they connect. But learn the five flavours of a four note chord (maj7, 7, m7, m7b5, dim7). From those you can use alteration and substitution to create most any harmony.

Above all, listen to a lot of jazz, to get the feel.

Resiliance
05-25-2008, 10:36 AM
For mellow jazz Bill Evans (look him up) always comes to mind.

But if you want some guitar, check this Wes clip out. One of the greatest ever.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOm17yw__6U



Jazz isn't so much about what you play, but how you play it. The whole modes thing? throw it out the window for now. It's only thought about in a small subset of jazz, and not in the way it's taught on this forum.

You can play anything with just the four basic triads if you know how they connect. But learn the five flavours of a four note chord (maj7, 7, m7, m7b5, dim7). From those you can use alteration and substitution to create most any harmony.

Above all, listen to a lot of jazz, to get the feel.

What he said.

Also, mellow jazz pretty much screams out the names Stan Getz and Ben Webster to me.

Nick_
05-25-2008, 12:56 PM
Ben Webster and Lester Young (Stan Getz's style is very derivative of Young's, but taken to a much different arena, bossa, and some bop) play here.

This clip is how I would define "blues" to someone who had no knowledge of it. Opinions on that may differ, but this is just dripping with the intangible element that makes blues blues.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tNSp7MaADM

Brass players in the house should pay attention to Roy Eldridge's ability to hit silly high notes at a pp dynamic with no apparent effort. That's the way you should be doing it.

SRV99
05-25-2008, 04:31 PM
Alabama by John Coltrane is one of the saddest jazz songs I've heard... Here's a video of it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8j_TDoOPnIA

Nick_
05-25-2008, 06:23 PM
I don't associate the Coltrane Quartet with mellow. I find it as intense as just about anything I can find, this stuff fries my brain and leaves me exhausted. I love it for it. I'm not sure it's what the original poster had in mind.

Good find though. the "Jazz Casual" seems to have produced some really good footage - there's a couple others from that date that I had seen (Afro Blue, and an awesome take of Impressions) but I'd missed that one.

pistols
05-26-2008, 02:17 AM
cheers for all the recs

by the way, to the first poster, i have kind of blue, it's awesome. i also have a george benson record, with earl klugh, but i don't know where my dad keeps our record player...is that one worth listening to?

hippieboy444: so basically, concentrate on the notes of the scale, but do runs with notes out of the scale, hit accidentals every now and again?

thanks everyone

Nick_
05-26-2008, 03:11 PM
concentrate on the notes of the chord (they are your stable, "home" tones). Use notes from scales, chromatics, whatever you want to get between them.

pistols
05-26-2008, 11:34 PM
awesome, cheers mate.

i guess that advice works for all chord-based (ie, not modal / melodic) jazz?
(that might be a dumb question, but give a noob a break :p: )

Resiliance
05-27-2008, 05:05 AM
awesome, cheers mate.

i guess that advice works for all chord-based (ie, not modal / melodic) jazz?
(that might be a dumb question, but give a noob a break :p: )

Yep. Chord tones be thy anchors. Hit them on downbeats, and when the chord changes try moving from one chord tone to the other.

In a basic ii-V-I progression, for example, you could easily go from the 7th of the ii to the 3rd of the V (they're only a half-step apart), and the same goes for the 7th of the V to the 3rd of the I.

You can do chromatic approachments too. For example, the whole neighbour tone concept. Just approaching each chord tone by a half step below or above, or both, before hitting your chord tone on a downbeat, for example, etc...

As chord tones go, the most important ones are the 3rd and the 7th, by the way. Usually, they also contain the sound of a certain chord, there really is no need to play the root and/or 5th (especially in band situations).

pistols
05-30-2008, 04:08 AM
awesome, cheers mate.

that should get me going for a while, thanks everyone

Joey-Tribiani
06-01-2008, 01:21 PM
mellow jazz...well, Roland kirks "I talk with spirits" has a few mellow ones in there, especially "the business aint nothing but the blues"
also, alot of charls mingus, not necceserally mellow, but its really awsome to listen to( try "moanin'")