ska strumming ?


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seizureman
08-22-2008, 03:18 AM
laugh if you must but i dont get it, how is it done, does anyone have a video ?

manmanster
08-22-2008, 03:22 AM
Its really easy dude. Hold your pick below the first e string and strum upward. Then, instead of bringing the pick down over the strings, put your hand back down in the original position below the first e string and repeat. Basicallly its all upstrokes.

seizureman
08-22-2008, 03:25 AM
yesssssss thank you so much, (i think my cousin was teaching me wrong on purpose lol)

BrianApocalypse
08-22-2008, 05:19 AM
It's easier once you get into the mindset of a retard...

axeslash
08-22-2008, 05:20 AM
Oh you clever bastard.

BrianApocalypse
08-22-2008, 05:27 AM
I'm a clever bastard and I sh*t all over ska music.

*facesits Neville Staple and curls off a big fat turd into his mouth*

sargasm
08-22-2008, 07:32 AM
I'll pretend I didn't see that

BrianApocalypse
08-22-2008, 07:50 AM
Sorry, got a little carried away.

Hello.Kitty
08-22-2008, 07:53 AM
Ska strumming isn't easy if you're good at it.

Listen to a lot of Selecter and Specials and try to time the rhythms and also notice where you're strumming with your right hand[assuming your right handed].

lavazza
08-22-2008, 09:43 AM
^Iīd listen to Op Ivy a lot......but thatīs a question of taste. I prefer the pattern, where your right hand just strumms everything and the left hand just presses on the off beat.

axeslash
08-22-2008, 09:50 AM
Same here, it has a more natural feel and allows me to play faster.

Hello.Kitty
08-22-2008, 08:33 PM
Operation Ivy strumming isn't easy to pick up if you do it perfect. Its not up and down really fast everytime and in fact most verses with ska strumming differ from each other for example Unity. At least thats what I get when I listen very closely. But when I listen to Operation Ivy to turn it all the way up and hear the little backup guitar chords and the overdubbing Jesse Michaels vocals where he lays 3 tracks down for a chorus and on one of them he'll routinely lose his note when singing out for a long period. Its a classic sound though.

And again if you're bashing ska strumming and think its easy I guarantee your ska sound and playing is awful.

StreetLight3989
08-22-2008, 08:57 PM
Yeah I strum and I just mute on the downstroke. Also, upstrokes on the offbeat.

werty22
08-22-2008, 08:59 PM
^I'm not bashing it, but it is easy. I can play it fine.

Edit: Sorry, that was to Vodka.Kitty.

Hello.Kitty
08-22-2008, 09:15 PM
I've seen so many ska bands have an awful rhythm guitarist its embarassing because they think its easy and keep doing the same upstrokes the whole song.

neidnarb11890
08-22-2008, 09:51 PM
The only thing difficult about ska strumming would be having enough coordination between your hands so that your left hand is muting the strings when your right hand is down stroking Which may be difficult for some people to get the hang of, I suppose.

But seriously, it's not rocket science.

manmanster
08-22-2008, 10:27 PM
rhythm guitar in general isn't a matter of technical proficiency but not only having good feel, but a great ear and ability to communicate and respond to the other instruments in the band, a set of skills arguably more difficult to develop than lead playing.

werty22
08-23-2008, 11:29 PM
Yes, but lead players have to have those skills too.

JesusOfSbrbia
08-24-2008, 01:22 AM
The basics of it are pretty easy. Strum down and up as normal, and mute the strings with your fretting hand when you strum downwards.

Once you've mastered that, practice the hell out of it and play along to a lot of different bands until you get a feel for some of the more advanced elements of it.

As mentioned before, Operation Ivy is a really good example. Personally, I taught myself ska strumming just by playing along to "Sound System" for an entire afternoon.

Examples of more advanced stuff you'll pick up from Op Ivy:

-Some of the downstrokes are muted (you'll hear the scratch noise), but some are not played at all. It's good to know when to mute a downstroke, and when to just skip it. It's also important to learn how to do that without losing the rhythm.
-Some of the timing is kinda awkward. Learn how long to hold each sounded chord. Some of the upstroked chords will be chopped off immediately after they're played, and some will ring out for a few beats. You just have to get a feel for it.
-Learn when to throw in a downstroke from time to time. In Op Ivy's ska songs, you'll find that the guitarist often sounds out the first downstroke in a measure, then the upstroke, then MUTES the next downstroke to resume normal ska strumming.

It's kinda hard to explain, but if you practice enough, you'll start to pick it up (lol).

l3p4rd
08-24-2008, 01:24 AM
Ska guitar is alittle tricky to start, but once you got it, you got it. I adapted to it pretty quick though.

To the TS, check out this: http://www.cyberfret.com/styles/ska/101/index.php

Hello.Kitty
08-24-2008, 02:01 AM
The basics of it are pretty easy. Strum down and up as normal, and mute the strings with your fretting hand when you strum downwards.

Once you've mastered that, practice the hell out of it and play along to a lot of different bands until you get a feel for some of the more advanced elements of it.

As mentioned before, Operation Ivy is a really good example. Personally, I taught myself ska strumming just by playing along to "Sound System" for an entire afternoon.

Examples of more advanced stuff you'll pick up from Op Ivy:

-Some of the downstrokes are muted (you'll hear the scratch noise), but some are not played at all. It's good to know when to mute a downstroke, and when to just skip it. It's also important to learn how to do that without losing the rhythm.
-Some of the timing is kinda awkward. Learn how long to hold each sounded chord. Some of the upstroked chords will be chopped off immediately after they're played, and some will ring out for a few beats. You just have to get a feel for it.
-Learn when to throw in a downstroke from time to time. In Op Ivy's ska songs, you'll find that the guitarist often sounds out the first downstroke in a measure, then the upstroke, then MUTES the next downstroke to resume normal ska strumming.

It's kinda hard to explain, but if you practice enough, you'll start to pick it up (lol).

I know what you're saying. I didn't want to put it in those words good job though.

JesusOfSbrbia
08-24-2008, 02:28 AM
I figured that's what you meant by "it's not easy if you're good at it." I just hope I didn't confuse anyone.

seizureman
08-26-2008, 12:07 AM
lol i actually started playing soundsystem again, and i think i finally got it