scalloped fretboard


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zackmuise
09-05-2008, 01:07 PM
I've checked out other threads but they dont get too specific, but what exactly is the advantage to haveing one?

Lil Macker
09-05-2008, 01:09 PM
It allows you to play faster, because you don't have to press the strings down as hard, I'm not too sure. But it takes a bit to get used to them.

Lemoninfluence
09-05-2008, 01:11 PM
having the extra space under the strings means you can get more of your finger to the side of the string to make bending easier.

it also means you have to use less force when fretting as it's possible to bend the note out of tune. but that's both an advantage and a disadvantage as it forces you to improve your technique but it means it's more difficult to play on.

KenG
09-05-2008, 01:15 PM
It also modifies your fingerboard beyond recovery. If you decide to try a scalloped fingerboard, you should use a guitar (strat/tele) with a bolt on neck in case it doesn't work out. Many advocate buying a replacement neck specifically for scalloping so your guitar can be restored to orignal condition should the scalloped, replacement neck not work out well or for resale.

maiden_mexico
09-05-2008, 03:58 PM
you lose all the tone you think you ever had. listen to yngwee malmsteen for examples.

ClassicAxe
09-05-2008, 04:04 PM
^ Your dumb.

nager
09-05-2008, 04:12 PM
^ Your dumb.
+1 lol

acdc51502112
09-05-2008, 04:36 PM
you lose all the tone you think you ever had. listen to yngwee malmsteen for examples.

have you had a mental examination recently?

maiden_mexico
09-09-2008, 08:32 PM
yeah. when the string vibrates against the fretboard when you fret a note it sends vibrations through the guitar. that is included in part of your tone. when the fretboard is scalloped there is nothing for the string to vibrate against except a metal fret.

Lemoninfluence
09-09-2008, 08:43 PM
yeah. when the string vibrates against the fretboard when you fret a note it sends vibrations through the guitar. that is included in part of your tone. when the fretboard is scalloped there is nothing for the string to vibrate against except a metal fret.
which is embedded into the wood of the fretboard.

believe it or not, when you press the string into the fret, it gets caught on the fret and stops vibrating beyond that point (as the finger deadens the vibrations) so there's really no discernible difference.

guitarnoize
09-09-2008, 09:54 PM
^ well said.

MESAexplorer
09-10-2008, 12:04 AM
Not to mention Yngwie IMO has one of the best lead guitar tones I've heard. It's just straight tone, no excessive reverb, gain, delay or BS, it's all fingers, fender and marshall.

IMO, when I scalloped the fretboards on my Washburn 7 and fender, I didn't feel much difference really. If you're playing correctly (finesse and relaxation) scalloping only allows you to bend easier, not much though. It basically gives medium or small fret guitars that Xjumbo fret feel.

JLT73
09-10-2008, 12:08 AM
It allows you to play faster, because you don't have to press the strings down as hard, I'm not too sure. But it takes a bit to get used to them.

it doesn't actually allow you to play faster

MESAexplorer
09-10-2008, 12:09 AM
it doesn't actually allow you to play faster

+1

Practicing allows you to play faster.

nan0
09-10-2008, 12:10 AM
Don't copy the fat pie faced drama ***** who does more poses than playboy models.

It's stupid, instead of bends you push the note in, and this shizit people are talking about doesn't even make sense. Fret wire is fret wire, it's like having jumbo frets you finger doesn't hit the wood. It can cause intonation problem with chords if you play too hard.

MESAexplorer
09-10-2008, 12:11 AM
Don't copy the fat pie faced drama ***** who does more poses than playboy models.

It's stupid, instead of bends you push the note in, and this shizit people are talking about doesn't even make sense. Fret wire is fret wire, it's like having jumbo frets you finger doesn't hit the wood. It can cause intonation problem with chords if you play too hard.

lol wut?

Nightfyre
09-10-2008, 12:12 AM
Not to mention Yngwie IMO has one of the best lead guitar tones I've heard. It's just straight tone, no excessive reverb, gain, delay or BS, it's all fingers, fender and marshall.

IMO, when I scalloped the fretboards on my Washburn 7 and fender, I didn't feel much difference really. If you're playing correctly (finesse and relaxation) scalloping only allows you to bend easier, not much though. It basically gives medium or small fret guitars that Xjumbo fret feel.
...which is a big part of I'll never scallop. I can't run bigger than jumbo, I favor mediums but they're hard to find on a guitar these days... so I settle for medium-jumbo.
Lemon nailed it, though he failed to mention that it makes chording VERY difficult, especially barre chords due to the force involved, which means you're likely to press too hard. It's really easy to bend chord tones out of tune, less so with single notes. I quote Blackmore and my own experience with a scalloped fretboard (not mine, obviously, but still). That's why some people only scallop the high frets, usually 12th or 17th on up. I think Laiho's signature is scalloped from the 20th fret up. Gives you the scalloped feel for solos but doesn't mess you up on chords.

MESAexplorer
09-10-2008, 12:15 AM
...which is a big part of I'll never scallop. I can't run bigger than jumbo, I favor mediums but they're hard to find on a guitar these days... so I settle for medium-jumbo.
Lemon nailed it, though he failed to mention that it makes chording VERY difficult, especially barre chords. It's really easy to bend chord tones out of tune, slightly less so with single notes. I quote Blackmore and my own experience with a scalloped fretboard (not mine, obviously, but still). That's why some people only scallop the high frets, usually 12th or 17th on up. I think Laiho's signature is scalloped from the 20th fret up. Gives you the scalloped feel for solos but doesn't mess you up on chords.

I had my fender fully scalloped. I like the feel, chording does feel a bit on the akward side. Mostly when you're trying to throw a few hammer ons or pull offs between changes. Didn't have so much trouble bending notes out of tune, probably because it's strung up with 11's. My washburn though, it's scalloped from the 7th fret and up, thats where you really don't do too much chording, and still then, there isn't enough space between the frets to really mess anything up.

KenG
09-12-2008, 09:52 AM
Scalloping isn't for everyone, just be aware your guitar will be hard to sell afterwards as less guitarists are into it. Again, using a bolt-on neck configuration like a Strat can at least allow you to go back should you not like it.