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-   -   Who's idea was this? (ICT700) (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1548214)

ExDementia 06-28-2012 03:55 PM

Who's idea was this? (ICT700)
 
So I just bought an Iceman ICT700, it was a factory second on ebay for $580 shipped with a ICT100c case (great deal).

I pull it out and it's just a beautiful guitar. The only problem is some shoddy paint on the binding along the fretboard, but it was a factory second for a reason right? I'm cool with that.

My complaint, is the location of the strap buttons, namely, the one closest to the neck. If you look at the picture below, you can see that the strap button is up about where most guitars strap would be, barring the Iceman's unique shape (this is a problem).



This makes the guitar very neck heavy while using the strap. It constantly wants to tilt the neck down which is very annoying. Also, it puts the strap at an angle that looks like it will drop at any time. Not a big deal, strap locks are cheap.

If you look at the IC400, it puts the strap button flat on the back of the guitar, just behind the neck:


This is much more comfortable, because it doesn't want to dip the neck down all the time. I don't understand how the people at Ibanez strapped this up and thought it was good to go. It's terrible placement.

My question is; would I be hurting anything by adding a strap button in the same spot the IC400 does? Is there anything special I need to know to do this, or would I be better off taking it to a shop? (I'm a fairly handy guy, but I don't want to mess up this guitar's beautiful tone.)

Thanks

EDIT: Or is it the back strap button that makes it lean forward so much? Now that I'm looking at it, it looks a little high up on the back of the guitar...

Dave_Mc 06-28-2012 04:01 PM

don't quote me (i could be completely wrong :o ), but i would imagine if you got a pro luthier to do it it wouldn't adversely affect the instrument (though it may affect resale value- any changes from the stock configuration, even if they're upgrades, pretty much reduce an instrument's resale value).

EpiExplorer 06-28-2012 04:04 PM

Strap Locks.

cemges 06-28-2012 04:07 PM

That's a frequent issue with this guitar. Strap lock indeed

ExDementia 06-28-2012 04:07 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by EpiExplorer
Strap Locks.


Did you even read the post? That's not the problem.

The problem is the placement. It makes the neck dip forward, forcing you to hold it up while on stage. Very annoying.

VanTheKraut 06-28-2012 04:11 PM

I'd make sure I wasn't drilling up too high (know how far youre going to need to drill, based on the length of the screw you're using). Wouldn't wanna go drilling and hit the fret board or neck pup cavity.

FatalGear41 06-28-2012 04:35 PM

You wouldn't be the first to move the lead strap button on an Iceman. It isn't a hard job - just drill the proper hole. But if you are worried, have a good repair tech do it for you. It is a very inexpensive and easy modification.

ExDementia 06-29-2012 12:30 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by FatalGear41
You wouldn't be the first to move the lead strap button on an Iceman. It isn't a hard job - just drill the proper hole. But if you are worried, have a good repair tech do it for you. It is a very inexpensive and easy modification.


I found a good luthier in my area. He quoted me a pretty reasonable price that includes setting up the action and intonation - which I wish I would have known last night because I spent about 2 hours dialing it in, lol.

Maybe it's just because it was a factory second, but this guitar came setup the worst I've ever seen on a high-ish end Ibanez. The action was high, the neck was a tad bowed, and the intonation was off just enough that it took me a while to really figure it out. :mad1:

Oh well. It plays great now.

archangelseren 12-10-2012 05:50 PM

can you post a pic of the new strap button placement?

T00DEEPBLUE 12-10-2012 05:56 PM

If you're going to sell the guitar on later, don't do this. It'll ruin the resale value.

However, if you want to keep it, go right ahead. The only things that you need are a means to measure (so you can get the button right in the middle of thickness of the body), a countersink bit to help guide the drill bit into the guitar so it doesn't slip and destroy the finish, and then finally the drill bit itself. wrap the drill bit in tape up to the length of screw you're going to be using so you don't end up drilling too deep.

Measure up, mark the spot, countersink the hole, drill the hole to depth, fit the button, profit.

JustRooster 12-10-2012 10:09 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by T00DEEPBLUE
If you're going to sell the guitar on later, don't do this. It'll ruin the resale value.

However, if you want to keep it, go right ahead. The only things that you need are a means to measure (so you can get the button right in the middle of thickness of the body), a countersink bit to help guide the drill bit into the guitar so it doesn't slip and destroy the finish, and then finally the drill bit itself. wrap the drill bit in tape up to the length of screw you're going to be using so you don't end up drilling too deep.

Measure up, mark the spot, countersink the hole, drill the hole to depth, fit the button, profit.



I came here to post exactly this. Seconded.

sk8board3r 12-11-2012 01:15 AM

Just drill a new hole, its only wood. Plug up the old hole and get black paint or nail polish and dab the spot a little, you'll never notice. It's not like its an American PRS or something, no biggie. Also, if I'm not mistaken that's the SG placement of a strap button.

trashedlostfdup 12-11-2012 02:11 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by T00DEEPBLUE
If you're going to sell the guitar on later, don't do this. It'll ruin the resale value.

However, if you want to keep it, go right ahead. The only things that you need are a means to measure (so you can get the button right in the middle of thickness of the body), a countersink bit to help guide the drill bit into the guitar so it doesn't slip and destroy the finish, and then finally the drill bit itself. wrap the drill bit in tape up to the length of screw you're going to be using so you don't end up drilling too deep.

Measure up, mark the spot, countersink the hole, drill the hole to depth, fit the button, profit.


is good in theory, but i sometimes the tape moves up and you drill deeper. i haven't done it a guitar, but i did on a cabinet when i was younger.

just be careful. or as stated take it in.


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