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-   -   How do you actually sing? (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1564420)

Count Duckula 09-23-2012 08:53 AM

How do you actually sing?
 
Hi everyone, I would like to be able to sing but I have no idea where to begin and something that is kind to my zero confidence, ahaha. But what are the mechanics of singing? What is a quick step by step that I can do to get started? Should I just ring a none on my guitar and hum the note while trying to match my 'hum' to the pitch and tune of the note I rang this guitar?

This is the kind of stuff that I would like to be able to sing:

Before you ask why I haven't just googled this and searched youtube and that's because there is hundreds of results and its easy to get overwhelmed. :(

Many thanks. :)

nightwalker903 09-23-2012 10:18 AM

It's baffled me a bit at times.

I think some people can sing and some just can't.

I don't have an issue with confidence but what comes out sounds like shit.

I'd like to be able to sing.
Would love to hear some advice too

wolfguitarist01 09-23-2012 10:41 AM

Well, just try humming a scale.

When you get confident try actually singing.

Maybe even play the song you're best at, then sing along to it.

Thats my advice, anyway.

I can't really sing, but sometimes it's fun to yell at a CD player lol

Darth_Pietrus 09-23-2012 10:42 AM

If all fails, just growl

Shornifier 09-23-2012 10:43 AM

Hey man

If you've never had experience with singing before, a good place to start is with breathing. Breathing is the core in singing as it is the source of the voice and the strength behind it; if you learn this correctly, the rest is just a matter of practice and hard work. The breathing you are doing now is normal breathing which is done through the lungs - easy. Unfortunately, this isn't the type of breathing we use for singing. For singing, we use a muscle called the diaphragm (younger students are taught to remember it as 'the poop muscle'). Oddly enough, it is one of the muscles you use when you are sitting on that toilet.

How do we use this muscle to breathe? The easiest way I've found is to lay straight on your back (bed, floor, any flat surface) with your entire body totally relaxed from head to toe. The only muscle you should be using are your eyelid muscles to blink at the ceiling. Then, place both hands flat on your stomach on both sides of your belly button. Your elbows should be bent but your arms still relaxed. *IMPORTANT PART* Now, you are going to inhale deeply (through your nose) and when you do this, try to channel the air to your stomach and not your chest. This means that you should feel your stomach rise with your hands. Inhale as much as you can, hold it for a few seconds, and then slowly exhale through your mouth. Why nose -> mouth? This is how you will be singing, so it's best if you start out the way you will be doing it in the future. If your chest puffs up, it means you are not using your diaphragm to breathe! This is a basic exercise that is easy to do. Once you've got a hold of it, do the same thing, but stand up. Feet flat on the floor, shoulders relaxed, and stand in an upright position (your windpipe should be straight so it can deliver properly).

To start on pitch, find a note you are most comfortable with. What note? Easiest way is to just randomly sing a note off the top of your head. This is likely to be a very comfortable note within your range. Now, using the breathing method explained earlier, hum that note - hum, not sing. Start off your hum at a moderate, normal volume and hold it there at the same volume, keeping it as steady as possible. Do this as many times as you want and focus on steadiness and consistency. After you've done the first exercise, hum the same note but starting as quietly as you can go. *IMPORTANT PART* You should still be using the same breathing technique with your diaphragm no matter how soft or quiet you are going. Starting softly, gradually project your voice with a moderate rise in volume - keeping your breathing steady - to the loudest hum you can manage. This is the crescendo. When you've reached full volume, it should feel like your teeth and the area around your nose are buzzing or vibrating. Still humming, do the same exact thing in reverse; you will gradually go back to a very soft voice.

These are very basic vocal exercises and there is a vast amount of things yet to be learned, but I find that although easy enough, these are absolutely crucial in developing your voice whether it's now or in the future. Once you've gotten tired of singing single notes, try singing whatever song of your preference. You don't have to do these exercises every time you want to sing something, but it will be very helpful if you do. Stay motivated, practice often, record yourself whether it sounds good or not, listen to yourself and look for places you could improve, and most importantly, singing (and any other thing in the world) IS NOT A COMPETITION. If you can't reach a note, it's fine! You can practice to get there or simply sing songs that sound great within your range! Your range will expand, your voice with become more powerful, you will learn technique all with time and devoted practice. Don't be afraid to sing loudly; if it is a bit awkward, find a place where you can practice alone without being interrupted - bring some food, a lot of water, your laptop, etc. I hope this helps (it should) and if you want to know anything else, I'm always willing to help.

On a side note, try to stay away from dairy products, things like peanut butter, carbonated drinks, alcohol, cigarettes, very cold water. Dairy products build up phlegm, peanut butter clogs the throat, carbonated drinks and alcohol will damage your throat, cigarettes will kill you, and cold water will 'freeze' your vocal chords. Drinking a lot of room temperature/warm water/tea is great. Yea, singing sucks sometimes lol.

Count Duckula 09-23-2012 11:45 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shornifier
Hey man

If you've never had experience with singing before, a good place to start is with breathing. Breathing is the core in singing as it is the source of the voice and the strength behind it; if you learn this correctly, the rest is just a matter of practice and hard work. The breathing you are doing now is normal breathing which is done through the lungs - easy. Unfortunately, this isn't the type of breathing we use for singing. For singing, we use a muscle called the diaphragm (younger students are taught to remember it as 'the poop muscle'). Oddly enough, it is one of the muscles you use when you are sitting on that toilet.

How do we use this muscle to breathe? The easiest way I've found is to lay straight on your back (bed, floor, any flat surface) with your entire body totally relaxed from head to toe. The only muscle you should be using are your eyelid muscles to blink at the ceiling. Then, place both hands flat on your stomach on both sides of your belly button. Your elbows should be bent but your arms still relaxed. *IMPORTANT PART* Now, you are going to inhale deeply (through your nose) and when you do this, try to channel the air to your stomach and not your chest. This means that you should feel your stomach rise with your hands. Inhale as much as you can, hold it for a few seconds, and then slowly exhale through your mouth. Why nose -> mouth? This is how you will be singing, so it's best if you start out the way you will be doing it in the future. If your chest puffs up, it means you are not using your diaphragm to breathe! This is a basic exercise that is easy to do. Once you've got a hold of it, do the same thing, but stand up. Feet flat on the floor, shoulders relaxed, and stand in an upright position (your windpipe should be straight so it can deliver properly).

To start on pitch, find a note you are most comfortable with. What note? Easiest way is to just randomly sing a note off the top of your head. This is likely to be a very comfortable note within your range. Now, using the breathing method explained earlier, hum that note - hum, not sing. Start off your hum at a moderate, normal volume and hold it there at the same volume, keeping it as steady as possible. Do this as many times as you want and focus on steadiness and consistency. After you've done the first exercise, hum the same note but starting as quietly as you can go. *IMPORTANT PART* You should still be using the same breathing technique with your diaphragm no matter how soft or quiet you are going. Starting softly, gradually project your voice with a moderate rise in volume - keeping your breathing steady - to the loudest hum you can manage. This is the crescendo. When you've reached full volume, it should feel like your teeth and the area around your nose are buzzing or vibrating. Still humming, do the same exact thing in reverse; you will gradually go back to a very soft voice.

These are very basic vocal exercises and there is a vast amount of things yet to be learned, but I find that although easy enough, these are absolutely crucial in developing your voice whether it's now or in the future. Once you've gotten tired of singing single notes, try singing whatever song of your preference. You don't have to do these exercises every time you want to sing something, but it will be very helpful if you do. Stay motivated, practice often, record yourself whether it sounds good or not, listen to yourself and look for places you could improve, and most importantly, singing (and any other thing in the world) IS NOT A COMPETITION. If you can't reach a note, it's fine! You can practice to get there or simply sing songs that sound great within your range! Your range will expand, your voice with become more powerful, you will learn technique all with time and devoted practice. Don't be afraid to sing loudly; if it is a bit awkward, find a place where you can practice alone without being interrupted - bring some food, a lot of water, your laptop, etc. I hope this helps (it should) and if you want to know anything else, I'm always willing to help.

On a side note, try to stay away from dairy products, things like peanut butter, carbonated drinks, alcohol, cigarettes, very cold water. Dairy products build up phlegm, peanut butter clogs the throat, carbonated drinks and alcohol will damage your throat, cigarettes will kill you, and cold water will 'freeze' your vocal chords. Drinking a lot of room temperature/warm water/tea is great. Yea, singing sucks sometimes lol.


Wow, this is great! Very much appreciated, thanks :D

lububble17 09-24-2012 10:05 PM

Wow! lots of info out there...just try to sing whatever song you can never get out of your head. Like the ones where the lyrics just stick. Singing along is great, but sometimes the singer has a different voice range. So turn off the tunes and sing from your heart :)

JohnySpades 09-24-2012 10:32 PM

If you truly doubt your voice, try recording yourself singing then play it. You would either be amazed or not once you hear it. If not then you should be doing some exercises:

Exercise regularly, jogging for 20 minutes is enough. But if you are in a time constraint do jump ropes; it's been scientifically proven that 2 minutes of jump ropes equal to 10 minutes of jogging. This would improve your breath capacity, blood flow, and increase power in your voice.

You need to also improve your chest voice if you want to sing rock. Do octave exercises of Gug and Buh;( sing them like you sing do re mi fa so la ti do except replace the do re mis, with buh buh buh or Gug gug gug) These would increase power, range, endurance, and tone in your chest voice, and also eliminate breathy voices, making you able to sing lower tones and scream like a rockstar. If you want a lazy man exercise, say YO! in a loud voice repeatedly (say, not shout), but you would sound like an @ss to your neighbors if you do it (Try vocalizing in the car).

Of course head voice is also important so everyday, say Drooooop, say it like a water drop falling from a faucet; Drooooop, or Bwooooop. You dont need any octave or scales for it. If you want a vocal exercise with a scale; do the La, or No, in an octave exercise (doing them like the gug exercise).

The one exercise that can improve your voice is a Lip Roll (look it up on youtube), it will improve your voice, address those bridges, remove tension, wam up your voice, and increase your vocal range (both reach those lows and highs).

Drink plenty of water, like half a gallon a day. Since Vitamin C is water based, eat foods rich in it, or take some pills on it especially when the weather's hot. Sleeping is important as well. Learn to play the piano (optional) and sing along with it to improve your sense of tone, rhythm, and musical abilities. And If you can, get voice lessons; be careful though, get a teacher who can teach you rock not classical (I wasted 4 months on this).

There is also a fantastic book called Complete Vocal Technique by Kathrin, it teaches you on how to really master your voice. Teaches you the anatomy, and just what to do to get that voice that you want. Teaches you also on how to acquire and develop distortions, growls, vibratos, etc.

cubs 09-24-2012 11:32 PM

yes. there is a singing section down in Musician Talk. lots of info. try using the search bar. this thread is in the wrong section, imma have to close it


*closed*


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