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-   -   How do I make this beveled edge? (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1568280)

W4RP1G 10-16-2012 10:57 PM

How do I make this beveled edge?
 
Is there a video or tutorial somewhere that shows how to do this? I'm guessing a table router with a 45 degree bit and a shim under one side of the guitar to create the gradual blend-in that you see on the left-hand side, but I'd really like to know how the pros do it.

Explorerbuilder 10-17-2012 12:56 AM

or ya know... a router table and a 45 degree bevel bit.

W4RP1G 10-17-2012 01:11 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Explorerbuilder
or ya know... a router table and a 45 degree bevel bit.

That won't create the gradual taper that I asked about.

oneblackened 10-17-2012 01:43 AM

Nah, it's just at different bit heights (I'm unsure of the technical term, I haven't done this in a while, but like... you're using more or less of the bit as you go along)

Explorerbuilder 10-17-2012 02:04 AM

you can do the taper by hand if you use a regular router instead of a table router. I have done it.

W4RP1G 10-17-2012 02:12 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by oneblackened
Nah, it's just at different bit heights (I'm unsure of the technical term, I haven't done this in a while, but like... you're using more or less of the bit as you go along)

I appreciate you taking a stab at it, but honestly, that's not a very helpful description.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Explorerbuilder
you can do the taper by hand if you use a regular router instead of a table router. I have done it.

Can you please explain how?

which ones pink 10-17-2012 03:12 AM

Maybe stick a cedar shim to the side of the guitar where you want the taper, and just follow it with the bevel bit. Or, alternatively, rough route and do the taper by hand with a rasp or similar, it's not difficult.

W4RP1G 10-17-2012 03:22 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by which ones pink
Maybe stick a cedar shim to the side of the guitar where you want the taper, and just follow it with the bevel bit.

That's probably what I'll end up doing(on several test pieces first, of course). I can't find a single mention of how to do this on the internet, so I guess I'm just going to have to with trial and error.

woad_yurt 10-17-2012 11:03 AM

Quote:
I'm guessing a table router with a 45 degree bit and a shim under one side of the guitar to create the gradual blend-in that you see on the left-hand side, but I'd really like to know how the pros do it.


That's almost how it's done. You need a piece of flat stock, like a piece of lattice material but probably a little thicker, taped across the gutar body going from side to side somewhere up near the neck pickup. If you put it one one side only, the work piece will/may tilt, leaving you with a big chunk ripped out.

I'm not a pro now but am a former pro with lots of experience making cabinets, furniture, etc. I used to do the same type of beveling on dozens of thin, tapered table legs. Push down hard and go very slowly and gradually or you may take out a chunk. Sudden movements are your enemy. Also, if you get close but not perfect, finish with a hand rasp. It was always that last, impatient, "just a little more" pass that would mess me up. Make sure the work piece doesn't teeter before you proceed and experiment on a scrap piece first. I heavily recommend using a good carbide tipped bit. The cheap ones cause problems and go dull fairly quickly, leaving you with burn marks and/or missing chunks. Unless you have a Plan B for your guitar body, I would definitely recommend avoiding freehanding it with a hand router; you'll only make a mess. Good luck!

Personally, is there a reason that you wouldn't want an even bevel all the way around? That way you wouldn't have the white binding/trim appearing to have a varying thickness. It'd also be far less prone to chipping if it got a knock down the road.

whoomit 10-17-2012 11:13 AM



One red line to the other (not in one pass), and for the gradual bit you could use a rasp, or a plane.

da_ 10-17-2012 11:15 AM

I would use a hand router with an angled bit in at and when I want the rout to slowly taper off, I would start moving the router away from the guitar so that the bearing would not be running along the edge of the guitar anymore. The other end, I would say that I would just have to stop and that would create the sudden taper.

deltaten 10-17-2012 11:27 AM

whut pink sez...use a shim. Trying to jig summat like that up would make ya crazy ! ;)
Ya slice a pc of hardwood the length ya need and width enuff at the butt to allow that amount of cutter to bite. Taper off to zero measurement. Tape above and below the guide bearing and finish with sander/rasp/plane of choice

woad_yurt 10-17-2012 11:28 AM

Quote:
I would start moving the router away from the guitar so that the bearing would not be running along the edge of the guitar anymore.


Routers grab, snag and chunk if that wheel isn't running along something. It doesn't work.

da_ 10-17-2012 11:36 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by woad_yurt
Routers grab, snag and chunk if that wheel isn't running along something. It doesn't work.


It works for me every time I do it with a round over bit and it needs to come off to not completely round over on the back side of the neck pocket.

woad_yurt 10-17-2012 11:51 AM

Quote:
It works for me every time I do it with a round over bit and it needs to come off to not completely round over on the back side of the neck pocket.

There's a big difference between ending a rout and freehanding a gradual taper.

There's a guaranteed way to do his job and I said how it's done. I used to own my own shop and have worked in quite a few others so I speak from lots of experience. I don't know how steady your hand is but I'm not going to assume that the OP can move his hand with the slowness, frimness, and consistency of a CNC machine. I can't and I have miles of router cuts under my belt.

With the method I described above, I used to bevel dozens of thin vase table legs with that same type of bevel on all four corners quickly and without mishap. Freehanding with the bit's wheel riding on nothing is something that takes a lot of skill and can result in a giant chunk being torn out. On top of that, isn't at all necessary here because there's a standard, easy, established method to do it. Attach some thin stock on the work piece and plow on. It only takes a minute to tape something of the appropriate thickness across the guitar body with masking tape.

W4RP1G 10-17-2012 02:17 PM

Thanks for the advice guys, I guess I have a few different methods to consider.

Quote:
Originally Posted by woad_yurt
That's almost how it's done. You need a piece of flat stock, like a piece of lattice material but probably a little thicker, taped across the gutar body going from side to side somewhere up near the neck pickup. If you put it one one side only, the work piece will/may tilt, leaving you with a big chunk ripped out.

I'm not a pro now but am a former pro with lots of experience making cabinets, furniture, etc. I used to do the same type of beveling on dozens of thin, tapered table legs. Push down hard and go very slowly and gradually or you may take out a chunk. Sudden movements are your enemy. Also, if you get close but not perfect, finish with a hand rasp. It was always that last, impatient, "just a little more" pass that would mess me up. Make sure the work piece doesn't teeter before you proceed and experiment on a scrap piece first. I heavily recommend using a good carbide tipped bit. The cheap ones cause problems and go dull fairly quickly, leaving you with burn marks and/or missing chunks. Unless you have a Plan B for your guitar body, I would definitely recommend avoiding freehanding it with a hand router; you'll only make a mess. Good luck!

Personally, is there a reason that you wouldn't want an even bevel all the way around? That way you wouldn't have the white binding/trim appearing to have a varying thickness. It'd also be far less prone to chipping if it got a knock down the road.


Well now you may have scared me out of doing it this way :p: Seems like a lot could go horrible wrong!

I really like the look of this particular bevel, so I wanted to copy it. I've already bound the whole guitar, so I definitely don't want to do this all the way around. I'm probably going to a lot of test cuts. I'm hoping that I can get the taper just right, then take really small bites. However, I don't have a back-up plan at this point, so I may chicken out at the last minute :(

woad_yurt 10-17-2012 02:56 PM

Do your learning on some scraps. Try what I said; it's easy. You'll see that it it's nothing beyond any normal person's capabilities.

W4RP1G 10-17-2012 03:05 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by woad_yurt
Do your learning on some scraps. Try what I said; it's easy. You'll see that it it's nothing beyond any normal person's capabilities.

Thanks, I'm definitely going to give it shot on some scraps. Do you happen to know if this particular technique has a name? I'd like to watch some video on it, if they exist.

BreeBreeMiikey 10-17-2012 04:43 PM

Definately not pro, but I've always used rasps and files. That way i can get the exact contours i want...not very time efficient though.

W4RP1G 10-19-2012 11:53 PM

I followed woad_yurt's advice. Came out pretty good. Next time, I'll use a thinner shim in and extend the taper further into the waste, but this will do just fine. You can check out my build in this thread: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...78#post30482178




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