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-   -   Should I even play guitar? (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1570649)

Flevi 10-30-2012 08:55 PM

Should I even play guitar?
 
Hello, my apologies if this is in the wrong section. Any way I have been playing guitar for a little over a month now, and ive been wondering if I should keep playing. For the first 2 weeks I had been playing about 4-5 hours a day and now I just kind of play up and down scales and try memorizing some stuff. Also I find chord changes to be rather difficult and I haven't made much progress on them.

Btw I don't want to get famous or whatever, I just play because it gives me something fun to do where I can have fun instead of doing my homework...

rickyj 10-30-2012 09:20 PM

If you want to play guitar, do it!

Only you can decide what you want to do. My advice would be to not let a lack of improvement dishearten you.




Ignore the part where he said he ignores his weaknesses, I'm pretty sure he didn't mean "he isn't good at a guitar technique so he doesn't practice doing it", i think he meant more along the lines of "I'm bad at [insert random life event] so I'll just practice something i enjoy".

Nero Galon 10-30-2012 09:22 PM

A month is really not that long.

It may seem like you're getting nowhere but trust me, after hours upon days upon months upon years of practicing even just 30 minutes a day you'll progress. Even if you don't notice it, others will.

AeolianWolf 10-30-2012 09:24 PM

if you need to ask us for validation, i think you know the answer.

even so, i'd advise you ignore that fact and keep playing anyway. if you're not making progress, it just means you're not doing things the right way. focus more on what you're doing. and don't worry about running up and down scales - that's not going to get you very far. focus more on training your ear with basic exercises like playing simple melodies by ear, and start learning theory and the basics of reading music. and start learning some more songs. you need the experience. frankly put, you've been playing guitar for a month, and that's nothing. it's like expecting to be fluent in a language in a month. simply not possible.

it doesn't matter whether you want to get famous or not - it matters more whether you prefer to be truly good at whatever you do.

some people say stupid things like "he was born to play guitar" or "she was meant for this", and that's complete and utter bullshit. anybody can learn to do anything. the only thing that separates the successful from the unsuccessful is their approach.

Peaceful Rocker 10-30-2012 09:29 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by AeolianWolf
if you need to ask us for validation, i think you know the answer.

even so, i'd advise you ignore that fact and keep playing anyway. if you're not making progress, it just means you're not doing things the right way. focus more on what you're doing. and don't worry about running up and down scales - that's not going to get you very far. focus more on training your ear with basic exercises like playing simple melodies by ear, and start learning theory and the basics of reading music. and start learning some more songs. you need the experience. frankly put, you've been playing guitar for a month, and that's nothing. it's like expecting to be fluent in a language in a month. simply not possible.

it doesn't matter whether you want to get famous or not - it matters more whether you prefer to be truly good at whatever you do.

some people say stupid things like "he was born to play guitar" or "she was meant for this", and that's complete and utter bullshit. anybody can learn to do anything. the only thing that separates the successful from the unsuccessful is their approach.

It's not bullshit. Some people have a nack for playing music. Just like others are naturally big and strong. I've seen people that were honestly a lost cause when it came to playing any instrument. No natural sense of timing, no musical ear. Ofcourse they could train themselves and learn to do it. It would just be alot more difficult for them.

ihartfood 10-30-2012 09:32 PM

you need a teacher or some inspiration. watch the steve vai video, this is a question only you hold the answer to.

AlanHB 10-30-2012 09:35 PM

^^^ Those Steve Vai vids are yuk.

Anyways most people will quit learning a new task within the first 3 months. Guitar is no different and for this reason there is a large amount of guitars that do nothing but sit in the corner of the bedroom.

If you commit and conquer this 3 month hurdle it "should" be smooth sailing from there. Otherwise you're just a statistic.

Some ways to help:
- Get a teacher.
- Learn full songs
- Learn chords

Considering I personally didn't learn any scales or solos until a year after I started playing, I'm consistently astounded that so many people start with them, and cannot play any songs after 1 year but have ridiculous speed on their mechanical exercises. A pretty boring/useless result to me.

Peaceful Rocker 10-30-2012 09:42 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanHB
^^^ Those Steve Vai vids are yuk.

Anyways most people will quit learning a new task within the first 3 months. Guitar is no different and for this reason there is a large amount of guitars that do nothing but sit in the corner of the bedroom.

If you commit and conquer this 3 month hurdle it "should" be smooth sailing from there. Otherwise you're just a statistic.

Some ways to help:
- Get a teacher.
- Learn full songs
- Learn chords

Considering I personally didn't learn any scales or solos until a year after I started playing, I'm consistently astounded that so many people start with them, and cannot play any songs after 1 year but have ridiculous speed on their mechanical exercises. A pretty boring/useless result to me.

Agreed. I just had fun feeling out the guitar for my first year. I was embarrassed to plug it in lol.

But by the time I really started learning theory, I was already really comfortable holding and playing the guitar. Comfortable with basic chords and such

zakarai 10-30-2012 09:44 PM

If you need any hope at all, the first month I started playing guitar I gave up cause I felt like it was too much for me to learn. Now I've been playing 4 years now and very happy with myself being able to do the stuff I can do now! (Trying not to sound like a jackass).
Learning may be the difficult part but after a good few years, you will never regret it.
I never regretted it!
I'm also self taught (:

AeolianWolf 10-30-2012 09:57 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peaceful Rocker
It's not bullshit. Some people have a nack for playing music. Just like others are naturally big and strong. I've seen people that were honestly a lost cause when it came to playing any instrument. No natural sense of timing, no musical ear. Ofcourse they could train themselves and learn to do it. It would just be alot more difficult for them.


of course some people will have more difficulty. but they can do it. the people who talk about who are "lost causes" simply didn't put in the practice. how do i know? i've had students just like that. if i say "do A and you'll get B", it's because doing A works, and will get them the result (B). the difference is not in the person themselves, but in the way they think. some people, even those at a disadvantage, will still do what i've advised them to do, and they're the ones that get results. other people will tell themselves that it isn't for them, or otherwise come up with some other reason (or just won't do it, plain and simple). when i said "the only difference between the successful and the unsuccessful is their approach", i meant it.

it's key to remember that timing and an ear are not "natural". you aren't born with them. you learn them at some point. people who become skilled musicians usually learn them earlier - so early, in fact, that they're perceived to be natural, because very few people remember actively learning them. unless, of course, you can prove to me that humans are somehow born already possessing knowledge and/or skills. it's the exact same deal with perfect pitch. it's a learned skill, but not everyone goes through the process required to learning it (often because we have no idea what it is around the crucial time that it needs to be learned).

if you want to take that kind of defeatist attitude, go ahead, but don't poison TS with it. attitude is everything in life, and it's the number one determining factor in whatever results you do (or don't) achieve. positive attitude? positive results. negative attitude? negative results. if you really think it's bullshit, i invite you to prove me wrong -- show me somebody who can't get results even though they're doing (and have done) everything correctly.

Peaceful Rocker 10-30-2012 10:01 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by AeolianWolf
of course some people will have more difficulty. but they can do it. the people who talk about who are "lost causes" simply didn't put in the practice. how do i know? i've had students just like that. if i say "do A and you'll get B", it's because doing A works, and will get them the result (B). the difference is not in the person themselves, but in the way they think. some people, even those at a disadvantage, will still do what i've advised them to do, and they're the ones that get results. other people will tell themselves that it isn't for them, or otherwise come up with some other reason (or just won't do it, plain and simple). when i said "the only difference between the successful and the unsuccessful is their approach", i meant it.

it's key to remember that timing and an ear are not "natural". you aren't born with them. you learn them at some point. people who become skilled musicians usually learn them earlier - so early, in fact, that they're perceived to be natural, because very few people remember actively learning them. unless, of course, you can prove to me that humans are somehow born already possessing knowledge and/or skills. it's the exact same deal with perfect pitch. it's a learned skill, but not everyone goes through the process required to learning it (often because we have no idea what it is around the crucial time that it needs to be learned).

if you want to take that kind of defeatist attitude, go ahead, but don't poison TS with it. attitude is everything in life, and it's the number one determining factor in whatever results you do (or don't) achieve. positive attitude? positive results. negative attitude? negative results. if you really think it's bullshit, i invite you to prove me wrong -- show me somebody who can't get results even though they're doing (and have done) everything correctly.

Good luck teaching music theory to someone with a below average IQ. Everyone's different..

But, I agree with you. Almost everything you said.

I don't think TS should just give up, especially after a month. But the way you completely negate talent, as if it doesn't exist at all.. gets under my skin.

arabmetallion 10-30-2012 10:40 PM

scales? just play all the songs you've always wanted to play with tabs, start out with easy stuff or just some simple riffs. from a casual's perspective it's all about having fun, you'll get better over time but you'l need as much motivation as you can when you start off. when you're used to the instrument (i.e your fingers don't ache anymore, know how to bend, know a few chords) then you start learning theory/scales etc.

AeolianWolf 10-30-2012 11:23 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peaceful Rocker
Good luck teaching music theory to someone with a below average IQ. Everyone's different..

But, I agree with you. Almost everything you said.

I don't think TS should just give up, especially after a month. But the way you completely negate talent, as if it doesn't exist at all.. gets under my skin.


i wouldn't say i negate talent...it's something i, my colleagues, and many on this forum possess.

it's the lack of ability i negate. or, rather, to clarify, it's the lack of ability as an excuse to give up on something i negate.

Flevi 10-30-2012 11:48 PM

Alright wow, explosion here. So I should play for 3 months then decide if I should go farther in my skill development? I think it may be possible I'm just in a rut this week, how often do you guys have ond of those times where you just want to play around with some riffs you know already know instead of practicing or learning new ones?

AeolianWolf 10-31-2012 12:13 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flevi
Alright wow, explosion here. So I should play for 3 months then decide if I should go farther in my skill development? I think it may be possible I'm just in a rut this week, how often do you guys have ond of those times where you just want to play around with some riffs you know already know instead of practicing or learning new ones?


no. don't give yourself a time frame, just do it. if you're going to put those "go big or go home" time limits you're going to end up with very little skill -- not just in music, but in life.

there's also a pretty big clue as to why you're not improving - you're not learning new material. you're staying in your comfort zone. doing that is the one surefire way to never improve. if you don't venture out into something new, you'll never get better.

Nero Galon 10-31-2012 12:15 AM

At 3 months in of playing, I still found it very difficult to play for long lengths of time. Chords were really hard to put together and my strumming was non-existent.

Patience is key. The biggest difference to the way I learn now to back then is how I take my time.

It is very easy to get frustrated and its hard to see the light at the end of the tunnel. The journey can be tedious but you slowly get to the end.

I am constantly going over stuff I learnt as a beginner. My brother (who I sometimes teach) finds it very annoying, he thinks that there is no point playing things over (which is why he can't progress because he gets bored easy and frustrated too much when he can't play something after 10 minutes)

It would be interesting to know what techniques you use to progress your playing too...

Flevi 10-31-2012 12:55 AM

I generally just play something bit by bit then play some bits together untill I remember all of the song or just the part I want to learn, I don't accually know any entire "real" songs I do know quite a few chords scales and jingles like the Mario theme Indiana jones and the pink panther and stuff like that also I share aoleonwolf's sense of straightforward no bullshiz approach

AeolianWolf 10-31-2012 01:37 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flevi
I generally just play something bit by bit then play some bits together untill I remember all of the song or just the part I want to learn, I don't accually know any entire "real" songs I do know quite a few chords scales and jingles like the Mario theme Indiana jones and the pink panther and stuff like that also I share aoleonwolf's sense of straightforward no bullshiz approach


underline: make that mess happen. learn some simple songs, head to toe. rock is usually good for this. try to find songs without solos for the time being. if you find a song with a solo that you like, just focus on the rhythm.

bold: then you'll do fine! :) if you take that approach and act upon it, you'll get good results!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flevi
I don't accually know any entire "real songs"



Nero Galon 10-31-2012 01:45 AM

Pretty much the same as me...

I can speak for many and say that going over and over WILL make you better at them naturally.

While learning a lot of new things is good and all, don't try to learn too much all at once, especially after just 3 months. If you're struggling to remember new things then chances are you need to focus on one or couple more and leave the rest till a little later.

The truth is, only you can decide. I LOVE playing and much like Steve Vai said in his video, I do picture myself performing sometimes. I didn't always feel like that though.

There are no real restrictions when it comes to playing. And if there are a some then they can be worked around. If you're not getting anything satisfying from playing then fair enough, maybe playing the guitar isn't for you, but if its because of the difficulties then keep at it because to me, nothing is more satisfying than looking back at how I couldn't do something to the present where I can.

Flevi 10-31-2012 02:01 AM

Thank you all for the comments Im going to learn me some nirvana songs now then.

I guess I really should learn guitar!
(hope that was cheesy enough)

And to Nero I too incision myself "performing" but usually I'm playing on the street in my daydreams, I think being a street musician would be a cool thing to do for a time


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