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-   -   Polyrhythms 2:3 or 3:2 (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1572102)

Jazzymetal420 11-09-2012 02:09 AM

Polyrhythms 2:3 or 3:2
 
title pretty much asks it. But is a "2 against 3 polyrhythm" the same as a 3 against 2? or 5 against 7 same as 7 against 5? Seems like people use them interchangeably.

food1010 11-09-2012 02:19 AM

The way I see it, the second number usually coincides with the beats or subdivisions within the given time signature.

Of course, this isn't always the case but it is a good distinguishing point.

For example, 2:3 would be dotted quarters against straight quarters in a 3/4 measure, whereas 3:2 would be eighth triplets against quarters in a 4/4.

My two cents. :shrug:

I do see what you're saying. Theoretically, you could look at a polyrhythm either way. It just depends which note duration you use as the "2" and which you use as the "3."

AeolianWolf 11-09-2012 02:21 AM

1) keep a beat, or (better yet) turn on a metronome.
2) tap eighth notes in your left hand, and triplets in your right. (2:3)
3) tap triplets in your left hand, and eighth notes in your right. (3:2)

any difference in the sound?

shreddymcshred 11-09-2012 03:15 AM

^Only if you accent one hand.

this is how Dusan Bogdanovic (classical guitar virtuoso, composer) suggests learning polyrhythmic passages when studying them. Feel each in the context of the other, and then be aware of both at the same time.

Life Is Brutal 11-09-2012 03:34 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by shreddymcshred
^Only if you accent one hand.

this is how Dusan Bogdanovic (classical guitar virtuoso, composer) suggests learning polyrhythmic passages when studying them. Feel each in the context of the other, and then be aware of both at the same time.


That's actually a good point.

AeolianWolf 11-09-2012 04:10 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by shreddymcshred
^Only if you accent one hand.

this is how Dusan Bogdanovic (classical guitar virtuoso, composer) suggests learning polyrhythmic passages when studying them. Feel each in the context of the other, and then be aware of both at the same time.


it's how i teach them, too -- funny. probably because it works.

keep it simple.

Reages 11-09-2012 07:04 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by AeolianWolf
1) keep a beat, or (better yet) turn on a metronome.
2) tap eighth notes in your left hand, and triplets in your right. (2:3)
3) tap triplets in your left hand, and eighth notes in your right. (3:2)

any difference in the sound?


is it possible to do it with both hands at the same time? ;O

shreddymcshred 11-09-2012 09:31 AM

yes actually, both hands would play the composite rhythms 1 2+ 3 (1 puh2 let)


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