UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com

UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/index.php)
-   Electric Guitar (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=26)
-   -   Dimarzio Super Distortion vs. Duncan Distortion? (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1573050)

KSEjunkie2468 11-14-2012 09:50 PM

Dimarzio Super Distortion vs. Duncan Distortion?
 
Hi Guys,

I've using a guitar with a ebony fretboard, mahogany body, a maple neck, and a floyd rose.

Which pickup is warmer sounding, hotter even (not necessarily higher output but sounds hotter)? Tighter bass? Better leads? etc

Thanks everyone in advanced for replies!

I play heavy metal, modern sound (pitch harmonic, bass heavy, singing leads,) but I also value a solid clean tone, and I like to play a Joe Satriani/Buckethead/Steve Vai-ish lead tone that sings (I've found that the Seymour Duncan Full Shred can do this, but it doesn't have enough strength, not balzy enough.)

Sullinger 11-14-2012 10:07 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by KSEjunkie2468
Hi Guys,

I've using a guitar with a ebony fretboard, mahogany body, a maple neck, and a floyd rose.



Learn this now: the wood a guitar is made of makes zero difference in the tone of the guitar when it's plugged it.

Offworld92 11-14-2012 10:12 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sullinger
Learn this now: the wood a guitar is made of makes zero difference in the tone of the guitar when it's plugged it.


Learn this now: you're full of shit.

@TS Do you have the Full Shreds now? Have you tried raising them?

Sullinger 11-14-2012 10:17 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Offworld92
Learn this now: you're full of shit.


Just to give you a little fact to prove it: inlays. A completely different material than the fingerboard; does this mean when you hit the 3rd, 5th, and 9th fret you get a different tone than the other frets?
How does wood affect how a magnet picks up metal strings?

Idiot.

+1 for the full shred though.

W4RP1G 11-14-2012 10:29 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sullinger
Just to give you a little fact to prove it: inlays. A completely different material than the fingerboard; does this mean when you hit the 3rd, 5th, and 9th fret you get a different tone than the other frets?
How does wood affect how a magnet picks up metal strings?

Idiot.

+1 for the full shred though.

Are you really suggesting that any tone from the fretboard material is produced only from the fret being played? I'm pretty sure the string oscillates from the bridge to the fret.

Sullinger 11-14-2012 10:33 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by W4RP1G
Are you really suggesting that any tone from the fretboard material is produced only from the fret being played? I'm pretty sure the string oscillates from the bridge to the fret.


A note is a note, the pickup just reads that. It can't pickup how much bass or treble it has.

Acousticly is a different story though.

W4RP1G 11-14-2012 10:38 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sullinger
A note is a note, the pickup just reads that. It can't pickup how much bass or treble it has.

Acousticly is a different story though.

I have no idea what you are saying. What do you mean it can't pickup how much bass or treble it has?

Also, saying "a note is a note" isn't a sufficient enough rebuttle for the point I made.

Sullinger 11-14-2012 10:42 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by W4RP1G
I have no idea what you are saying. What do you mean it can't pickup how much bass or treble it has?

Also, saying "a note is a note" isn't a sufficient enough rebuttle for the point I made.


I mean a pickup isn't a microphone; it's just a magnet. When you hit a string, let's say the E, it knows it's 329.63ish Hz. That's all. Wood does effect sustain (on the fretboard anyways) and other things like that, but not the tone.

W4RP1G 11-14-2012 10:50 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sullinger
I mean a pickup isn't a microphone; it just a magnet. When you hit a string, let's say the E, it knows it's 329.63ish Hz. That's all. Wood does effect sustain (on the fretboard anyways) and other things like that, but not the tone.

The theory behind tone woods in an electric guitar is about the transfer of vibrations into the wood and then back into the strings.

Personally I think tone woods exist since I've done pickup swaps many times and have noticed a significant difference in the tone a pickup puts out when the body wood is changed. But there is no conclusive study for this that either of us can cite, so it's all speculation. If you want to do a study on it, please do so, but until you do and present the facts, any anecdotal evidence that anyone spews forth is subject to dismissal.

FatalGear41 11-14-2012 10:50 PM

Thus sayeth the Lord: "Thou shalt not hijack thy neighbor's thread!"

The DiMarzio SD and the Duncan Distortion are both fine pickups for what you want to play. The DiMarzio SD is designed to be a little bass heavy, as a lot of aftermarket pickups back in the '70s (when the SD first came out) were rather shrill. I think the Duncan Distortion is the better choice. It has a better, more balanced tone; it is plenty hot for various shades of metal and the thing really cuts through. I have them in a few guitars and I'm quite happy wih them. But you probably couldn't go wrong with either choice.

Sullinger 11-14-2012 10:52 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by W4RP1G
Personally I think tone woods exist since I've done pickup swaps many times and have noticed a significant difference in the tone a pickup puts out when the body wood is changed. But there is no conclusive study for this that either of us can cite, so it's all speculation. If you want to do a study on it, please do so, but until you do and present the facts, any anecdotal evidence that anyone spews forth is subject to dismissal.


Well, were the pickups the exact same height when you put them in? Were the pots exactly the same? Did you use the same strings?

W4RP1G 11-14-2012 10:57 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sullinger
Well, were the pickups the exact same height when you put them in? Were the pots exactly the same? Did you use the same strings?

I always use the same pots, strings, and setup. I could argue that the bridge type had an effect as well(which it very well may have, imo), but that would still go against your theory that the strings vibrations are uninfected by connected components.

KSEjunkie2468 11-14-2012 10:59 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by FatalGear41
Thus sayeth the Lord: "Thou shalt not hijack thy neighbor's thread!"

The DiMarzio SD and the Duncan Distortion are both fine pickups for what you want to play. The DiMarzio SD is designed to be a little bass heavy, as a lot of aftermarket pickups back in the '70s (when the SD first came out) were rather shrill. I think the Duncan Distortion is the better choice. It has a better, more balanced tone; it is plenty hot for various shades of metal and the thing really cuts through. I have them in a few guitars and I'm quite happy wih them. But you probably couldn't go wrong with either choice.


Lmao! I like that commandment. Thanks for the information :)

Sullinger 11-14-2012 10:59 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by W4RP1G
I always use the same pots, strings, and setup. I could argue that the bridge type had an effect as well(which it very well may have, imo), but that would still go against your theory that the strings vibrations are uninfected by connected components.

String vibrations are affected, but how a string vibrates doesn't change the tone; only the musical value.

KSEjunkie2468 11-14-2012 11:02 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sullinger
I mean a pickup isn't a microphone; it's just a magnet. When you hit a string, let's say the E, it knows it's 329.63ish Hz. That's all. Wood does effect sustain (on the fretboard anyways) and other things like that, but not the tone.


Okay Sullinger, then lets start making guitars out of plywood and dried compounded shaped pieces of garbage since what a guitar is made out of doesn't affect its tone. I mean, are you serious?

Different guitar body types are known to sound brighter, or darker, etc. Maybe you can't hear the difference, but others can.

W4RP1G 11-14-2012 11:02 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sullinger
String vibrations are affected, but how a string vibrates doesn't change the tone; only the musical value.

Sure it does. Play a note on the low E at the 22nd fret(C# I believe), now play it on the B string, 2nd fret. Same frequency, different tone, right?

Sullinger 11-14-2012 11:05 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by KSEjunkie2468
Okay Sullinger, then lets start making guitars out of plywood and dried compounded shaped pieces of garbage since what a guitar is made out of doesn't affect its tone. I mean, are you serious?

Different guitar body types are known to sound brighter, or darker, etc. Maybe you can't hear the difference, but others can.


A guitar made of plywood is going to have cheaper electronics; that's why the tone is different.

Sullinger 11-14-2012 11:06 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by W4RP1G
Sure it does. Play a note on the low E at the 22nd fret(C# I believe), now play it on the B string, 2nd fret. Same frequency, different tone, right?

.... no?

Sullinger 11-14-2012 11:07 PM

Why does everyone get all butthurt and won't accept that wood doesn't make a tonal difference? It's like evoultion...

KSEjunkie2468 11-14-2012 11:09 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sullinger
A guitar made of plywood is going to have cheaper electronics; that's why the tone is different.


Ok you seemed to dismiss my point.

Heres guitar A, what of plywood and garbage. Here's guitar B made of the highest quality mahoney. The ONLY THING that is different about the guitar is what the guitar's body is made of and everything else is built to scale, same pickups, electronics, tone and volume pots, etc.

You are saying that those two guitars would sound the same? Because if you think they would, you have no business playing guitar.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:06 PM.

Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.