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-   -   Come up with new licks within a scale pattern? (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1574528)

gui8tar 11-24-2012 02:53 PM

Come up with new licks within a scale pattern?
 
I just recently learned A minor, A harmonic minor and A major. I practice them along side backingtracks off of youtube. I find my self repeating the same licks. I think a big part of the problem is coming up with new rhythm. I was wondering if any one knew of a exercise or something that could help me solve this problem.

Youtube does not have that much of a verity when it comes to backing tracks, any one know of a good place to get free backingtracks.

Zaphod_Beeblebr 11-24-2012 03:07 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by gui8tar
I just recently learned A minor, A harmonic minor and A major. I practice them along side backingtracks off of youtube. I find my self repeating the same licks. I think a big part of the problem is coming up with new rhythm. I was wondering if any one knew of a exercise or something that could help me solve this problem.

Youtube does not have that much of a verity when it comes to backing tracks, any one know of a good place to get free backingtracks.


Stop playing and start listening. Until you listen to what you're doing and think about the sounds you want to make you'll keep playing the same things over and over again.

Think about the sounds you want to make and then think about how to get to those sounds. If you don't know how then you've got some learning and practice to do but that's where things should begin: in your mind. If you're not thinking about what you're doing then you're not really playing the guitar, you're just reciting muscle memory.

gui8tar 11-24-2012 03:18 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Stop playing and start listening. Until you listen to what you're doing and think about the sounds you want to make you'll keep playing the same things over and over again.

Think about the sounds you want to make and then think about how to get to those sounds. If you don't know how then you've got some learning and practice to do but that's where things should begin: in your mind. If you're not thinking about what you're doing then you're not really playing the guitar, you're just reciting muscle memory.



Grate post!!! Your right I need to concentrate harder, listen to the licks inside my head and try to produce them on the guitar. I think a big part of the problem is keeping up with the backing track, I often play these same rifts because tempo of the tracks. I should start with a lower tempo and climb so that my brain can keep up.

But I am still hoping for a exercise or something of the sort to push me a little harder.

Thermon 11-24-2012 03:26 PM

Sequencing of scales helps quite a bit, once you get good at sequencing you can use just running through the scales to create some cool lines. Of course, that shouldn't be an entire solo or anything or it'd be boring, but sequencing does help to add some variety when used tastefully.

Scorpyin 11-24-2012 03:57 PM

Stop playing in 4/4... seriously, im not actually a guitar player, i drum... but before you make all your shitty drummer jokes, just listen. If rhythem is your problem, trying playing in different time signatures (nothing too fancy, a simple waltz will help), ever since my guitar player and i started experimenting with different time signatures, our rhythm section completely changed.

At the same time, this won't garantee results, you still need to actually come up with new rhythms. But maybe playing in unfamiliar time signatures will encourage you to play and try new things..

gui8tar 11-24-2012 06:24 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scorpyin
Stop playing in 4/4... seriously, im not actually a guitar player, i drum... but before you make all your shitty drummer jokes, just listen. If rhythem is your problem, trying playing in different time signatures (nothing too fancy, a simple waltz will help), ever since my guitar player and i started experimenting with different time signatures, our rhythm section completely changed.

At the same time, this won't garantee results, you still need to actually come up with new rhythms. But maybe playing in unfamiliar time signatures will encourage you to play and try new things..



Grate advice I will give it a try.

B&J 11-24-2012 06:40 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scorpyin
Stop playing in 4/4... seriously, im not actually a guitar player, i drum... but before you make all your shitty drummer jokes, just listen. If rhythem is your problem, trying playing in different time signatures (nothing too fancy, a simple waltz will help), ever since my guitar player and i started experimenting with different time signatures, our rhythm section completely changed.

At the same time, this won't garantee results, you still need to actually come up with new rhythms. But maybe playing in unfamiliar time signatures will encourage you to play and try new things..

This is sooooo very true! Since i met a great drummer he increased my guitar skills and not only that but my songwriting skills too. After a simple 3/4 try creating cross rhythms :D

cringer 11-25-2012 04:08 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by gui8tar
I just recently learned A minor, A harmonic minor and A major. I practice them along side backingtracks off of youtube. I find my self repeating the same licks. I think a big part of the problem is coming up with new rhythm. I was wondering if any one knew of a exercise or something that could help me solve this problem.
...

Repeating the same licks is a clue that you might not be learning scales, as much as "shapes" & memorizing fretboard patterns.

Many people fall into this trap (myself included).

A good exercise to break out of that is to practice scales in different ways... here's an example of something I found helpful:

using A Minor over your backing track...
Day 1 - improvise on the B & G strings only, using the entire length of the neck.
Day 2 - same thing with G & D strings
Day 3 - same thing wtih D & A strings
Day 4 - B, G and D strings
Day 5 - A, D, G strings

and so on... until you're playing all 6 strings up and down the neck.

I hope that helps.

gui8tar 11-26-2012 05:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by cringer
Repeating the same licks is a clue that you might not be learning scales, as much as "shapes" & memorizing fretboard patterns.

Many people fall into this trap (myself included).

A good exercise to break out of that is to practice scales in different ways... here's an example of something I found helpful:

using A Minor over your backing track...
Day 1 - improvise on the B & G strings only, using the entire length of the neck.
Day 2 - same thing with G & D strings
Day 3 - same thing wtih D & A strings
Day 4 - B, G and D strings
Day 5 - A, D, G strings

and so on... until you're playing all 6 strings up and down the neck.

I hope that helps.



I do this often, probably more then I should. I do use my head when I am playing but when you hear the same backing tracks, with the same chord progressions you cant help but to think of something you have done many times before. I am starting to see that its more of a timing issue. I use metronome before practice, practice my scales up to 200bpm but when your listening to a song, allot more elements are thrown in thus using more of your brain power. I find that when I play slower tempo songs and work my way up I am much more comfortable and dont use my fillers as much.

Art Vandalay 11-26-2012 07:26 PM

I make it a point in my improv practice to use notes on the scale from several different positions. I'll try to start my lick in one position and try to work up or down the neck into different positions of the scale and pay very close attention to what note/intervals I"m using and what they sound like. This helps you learn the notes on the neck and how they relate to eachother in various keys. For me this method improved my knowledge of theory and my creative phrasing and such more in just a few months than years of just hammering away on box patterns ever got me.

MatthewKane 11-29-2012 03:02 AM

One thing that helped me understand the neck was to learn the shapes of the 7 modes: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixalydian, Aeolian, and Locrian. One you know these 7 patterns, and develop an understand of how to connect the shapes, you will be able to look at the neck, and know every note on the neck in whatever given key you are playing in.

By learning one scale you are confining yourself to one areas of the neck. Once you open the door to understanding the full length of the fretboard as one giant scale form it will help you expand your licks.

Every guitarist has his patterns, and tricks that he repeats. That just goes with the territory. Sit down, learn a Hendrix solo, a Metallica solo, study other guitarists playing, steal their licks and then take the licks you do know, combine them with the new things you've learned. When you feel like doing the same thing you always do make it a point to grab a different note. It's about practice, and study.

Zaphod_Beeblebr 11-29-2012 04:42 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MatthewKane
One thing that helped me understand the neck was to learn the shapes of the 7 modes: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixalydian, Aeolian, and Locrian. One you know these 7 patterns, and develop an understand of how to connect the shapes, you will be able to look at the neck, and know every note on the neck in whatever given key you are playing in.

By learning one scale you are confining yourself to one areas of the neck. Once you open the door to understanding the full length of the fretboard as one giant scale form it will help you expand your licks.


No. So very much No.

You don't understand modes or normal diatonic theory, please don't advise people about either of those any time soon.


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