UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com

UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/index.php)
-   Musician Talk (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=8)
-   -   too much too learn (http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1575449)

skilly1 11-29-2012 05:51 PM

too much too learn
 
It seems sometimes that theres to much to learn, scales, chord tones, rythyms. Do you get to a point where you can see your own progress and rely less on all the theory and kind of figure a lot out by yourself through instincts and knowledge that you've picked up along the way, or are there no short cuts

supersac 11-29-2012 06:36 PM

the problem is your relying on hteory
theory is just there to explain what you and others already doing and help you explain the sounds

and no theresno shprtcuts...also its not to complexonce youi really understand the basics

TK1 11-29-2012 06:44 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by supersac
theory is just there to explain what you and others already doing and help you explain the sounds


This. One thousand times this. Couldn't have explained it better myself.

When I get to a point where I feel like there's so much to learn, I step back and I try to make connections between things I already know. Make a stronger foundation for your knowledge to sit on so when you learn more, it makes sense and sticks.

Mathedes 11-29-2012 07:23 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by skilly1
It seems sometimes that theres to much to learn, scales, chord tones, rythyms.

Hate to down your point, but that's only skimming the surface because that's your basic musical vocabulary. That's like the first 4 chapters of a theory textbook.

Quote:
Do you get to a point where you can see your own progress and rely less on all the theory and kind of figure a lot out by yourself through instincts and knowledge that you've picked up along the way, or are there no short cuts

Yes. The more you learn and understand makes it easier to become second nature/instinctive because you start to understand what sounds good to YOU.

What sounds good to you? Figure it out. Learn the technical basics (scales, chords, rhythm, and proper playing technique), study your favorite songs, and trust your own expression.

Dayn 11-29-2012 07:50 PM

Theory is a shortcut. You take advantage of centuries of knowledge across all of humanity. Much easier than reinventing the wheel.

Over time, the things you practice become automatic. So long as you understand what you're doing instead of rote memorisation, it'll be automatic with practice.

HotspurJr 11-29-2012 08:40 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by skilly1
It seems sometimes that theres to much to learn, scales, chord tones, rythyms. Do you get to a point where you can see your own progress and rely less on all the theory and kind of figure a lot out by yourself through instincts and knowledge that you've picked up along the way, or are there no short cuts


You should always be playing, experimenting, and discovering.

But you should also always have goals in mind. "I'd like to be able to do X." Then you talk to an instructor, or ask here, or what have you ... and figure out what you need to work on right now to help you get to "X."

Theory is one of those things that people picks up bits of. You study it in part to avoid going down pointless rabbit holes (modes!) but also because these are the fundamental concepts you're going to encounter in music again and again.

But you don't study it in a void. You're always developing your ear to make sure you can HEAR those concepts, and looking for practical examples.

food1010 11-29-2012 11:11 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayn
Theory is a shortcut. You take advantage of centuries of knowledge across all of humanity. Much easier than reinventing the wheel.

Over time, the things you practice become automatic. So long as you understand what you're doing instead of rote memorisation, it'll be automatic with practice.
Very well put. Theory takes the mystery about it. Music shouldn't be a guessing game. Ultimately you want to get to the point where there are no barriers between mind and instrument. When writing/improvising, you want to hear in your head what you want to play and be able to play it effortlessly. Some people get there without theory, but it takes a lot longer.

Hail 11-30-2012 12:03 AM

mastering a craft takes longer than a couple months. even bach was still learning when he died

91RG350 11-30-2012 02:20 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by HotspurJr
You should always be playing, experimenting, and discovering.

But you should also always have goals in mind. "I'd like to be able to do X." Then you talk to an instructor, or ask here, or what have you ... and figure out what you need to work on right now to help you get to "X."

Theory is one of those things that people picks up bits of. You study it in part to avoid going down pointless rabbit holes (modes!) but also because these are the fundamental concepts you're going to encounter in music again and again.

But you don't study it in a void. You're always developing your ear to make sure you can HEAR those concepts, and looking for practical examples.

+1'ing this

Yes TS.... it does become automatic after a while...and theory does help... just choose short term goals and you'll be fine. Dont look at the top of the mountain and think "wow what a long way away"... instead... look to your feet and the step immediately in front of you.... its only 20 cm high, right? Not so hard at all.

Choose some smal goals and let the big picture take care of itself.... might be nailing barre chords... might be learning a scale.... might be learning the first 4 bars of a song... etc etc etc...


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:25 PM.

Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.